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Full text of "1967 Economic Censuses. Procedural History"

U.S. 

DEPARTMENT 

OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF 
THE CENSUS 









ECONO 
CENSUSES 



PROCEDURAL 

9 SS^h9P I %b^F"$ x 




1967 

ECONOMIC 





SV?\ 



-6 ^^- S? 



£ 
^ 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Maurice H. Stans, Secretary 

James T. Lynn, Under Secretary 

Harold C. Passer, Assistant Secretary for Economic Affairs 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS George Hay Brown, Director 



Preface 

The essential purpose of this report is to present a comprehensive 
summary of the procedures used in conducting the 1967 Economic 
Censuses of the United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands 
which were taken in 1968. It was compiled principally from the memo- 
randums, specifications, and other procedural documents which were 
prepared during the period when the censuses were planned and 
conducted. 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

George Hay Brown, Director 
Robert L. Hagan, Deputy Director 

Walter F. Ryan, Associate Director 
for Economic Fields 

James W. Turbitt, Associate Director 
For Economic Operations 



DATA USER SERVICES OFFICE 
Robert B. Voight, Chief 



This procedural history was prepared in what was formerly the General 
Reports Division, History and Research Reports Branch, by the 
Economic Censuses Historians, under the direction of William Lerner, 
Chief, General Reports Divisions, Edward P. Swan, Assistant Chief, and 
Phyllis G. Carter, Chief, History and Research Reports Branch. Many of 
the source documents and information for appendixes were collected and 
catalogued by Florence Haimes (Economic Censuses Historian, April 
1968-February 1970), who also wrote the early drafts of Chapters 1 to 6. 
Charles G. Langham (Economic Censuses Historian, February 1970 to 
the present) collected additional source materials, prepared first drafts of 
Chapters 7 to 13, and wrote the final drafts of all chapters. 

A major contribution to the report was made by Donald Wright, Trans- 
portation Division, whose historical summary was used almost in its 
entirety in preparing Chapter 12 (Census of Transportation). The fol- 
lowing individuals critically reviewed the manuscript and made valuable 
suggestions for additions, deletions, and other improvements: Joseph 
Arbena (Jeffersonville Census Operations Division), E. Richard Bourdon 
(Processing Division), Eugene Wendt (Systems Division), Louis Greenberg 
(Business Division), Arthur Horowitz (Economic Censuses Coordinator), 
Robert Makoff (Administrative and Publications Services Division), Willis 
K. Jordon and John Berube (Industry Division), Robert Parker (formerly 
of the General Economic Statistics Division), and Donald Young 
(Construction Statistics Division). 



Editorial and writing assistance was provided by Carol Donnelly and 
Everitt Simms, General Reports Division. Nancy Ross and Patricia 
Martin, also of the General Reports Division, typed various drafts and 
rendered clerical assistance. Editorial supervision in the Administrative 
and Publications Services Division was provided by Julia Moring. 



Library of Congress Card No. 72/600000 
Suggested Citation 

U.S. Bureau of the Census 
1967 Economic Censuses: Procedural History 

U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1972 

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington, D.C. 20402, or any Department of Commerce field office. Price $2.50 
(paper cover) - Stock Number 0301-2281 



CONTENTS 



Page 



CHAPTER 1 

2-10 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

APPENDIX A 
B 
C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 



The 1967 Economic Censuses in Brief iv 

Introduction 1 

Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 

Planning and Preparatory Operations 11 

Developing the Mailing List 17 

Geographic Area Coding 22 

Preparations for Mailing Questionnaires 25 

Data Collection Operations 33 

Data Processing 39 

Conducting the Censuses in Outlying Areas 46 

Enterprise Statistics 51 

Publicity and the Publications Program 55 

Census of Construction Industries 64 

Census of Transportation 68 

Census of Commercial Fisheries 83 

Key Personnel . 88 

Consultation and Meetings on the Census Inquiries 93 

Chronology of Major Events 108 

Differences Between the 1967 and 1963 Standard Industrial Classification . . -|Q9 

Definitions and Descriptions of Geographic Areas Covered 112 

List of Questionnaires 122 

Facsimiles of Selected Questionnaires 129 

Published Census Reports 301 



in 



THE 1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES IN BRIEF 



INTRODUCTION 

Collection of data on economic activities has its roots deep in 
the Nation's history. In fact, the census of manufactures taken 
in 1810 followed by only 20 years the first census of any kind 
in the United States, the census of population taken in 1790. 
Statistics on mining were first collected in 1840, on commercial 
fisheries in 1880, on business and construction in 1929, and on 
transportation in 1963. 

The 1967 Economic Censuses included censuses of business, 
manufactures, mineral industries, construction industries, 
commercial fisheries, and transportation. These censuses were 
conducted under the authority of Title 13 of the United States 
Code, which specifies that they be taken every 5 years, and, as 
recently amended, to cover years ending in 2 and 7. Expendi- 
tures for the project totaled approximately $22.6 million, which 
was appropriated by Congress over a 5 year period beginning 
with the 1966 fiscal year. 

In planning the 1967 Economic Censuses, the Census Bureau 
relied heavily on the expertise of other governmental and 
private organizations and made a special effort to elicit the 
cooperation of these organizations. The Bureau consulted and 
coordinated extensively with trade associations (for example, 
the National Association of Home Builders and the National 
Retail Merchants Association), professional organizations (such 
as the American Institute of Architects and the American Insti- 
tute of Consulting Engineers), and advisory committees (such as 
the Census Advisory Committee of the American Statistical 
Association and the Census Advisory Committee of the 
American Economic Association). Numerous Federal agencies 
(such as the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Federal Reserve 
Board, and the Office of Business Economics) were also 
consulted. In several instances, Census Bureau officials visited 
individual business firms for a mutual exchange of ideas about 
the censuses. Within the Census Bureau, various planning 
committees were established to bring together the statisticians, 
economists, computer specialists, operations research and 
management experts, and other specialists who would be 
involved in the conduct of the censuses. 

For the censuses of business, manufactures, construction 
industries, and mineral industries, statistics were collected and 
published in terms of the "establishment," an economic unit 
that produces goods or services, and, in most cases, has a single 
physical location. For part of the census of transportation, the 
analogous reporting unit was the "carrier," and for the census of 
commercial fisheries, the "vessel operator." The scope of the 
economic censuses was defined and census results were 
tabulated on the basis of the Standard Industrial Classification 
iv 



(SIC) system. The SIC, developed under the direction of the 
Office of Management and Budget of the Executive Office of 
the President, classifies establishments by the type of activity in 
which they are engaged and is used in presenting most of the 
basic business and industrial data gathered by governmental and 
private organizations in the United States. 

Economic census data were collected (1) by asking establish- 
ments to complete and return questionnaires, and (2) by 
extracting information from administrative records (such as 
income tax returns) used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) 
and the Social Security Administration (SSA). In the 1967 
censuses, about 1.9 million establishments were asked to 
complete questionnaires; information for the other 2.9 million 
establishments included in the censuses was obtained from 
administrative records. In general, administrative records were 
used in place of census questionnaires for nonemployers (firms 
without paid employees) and selected small employers 
(establishments with few employees). (Nonemployers were not 
included in the scope of censuses of manufactures, mineral 
industries, and commercial fisheries, or in the wholesale trade 
section of the business census.) 

The census questionnaires (of which there were approxi- 
mately 440 different versions) included general questions such 
as kind of business, physical location of the establishment, and 
type of ownership. There were also specific inquiries tailored to 
the particular type of establishment (retail store, mine, factory, 
etc.) being canvassed. For example, retail stores were asked 
about their merchandise lines and selling space in the store while 
factories were queried about materials used in the manu- 
facturing process and number of production workers. Informa- 
tion extracted from administrative records included sales, pay- 
roll, and employment data, location, and industry classification. 
The economic census statistics were usually published by kind 
of business or industry, by geographic location (such as State or 
county), and by other classifications such as amount of sales, 
employment, legal form of organization, and degree of 
specialization. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, 
AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Basically similar procedures were employed in conducting the 
censuses of business, manufactures, and mineral industries. 
First, initial planning and preparatory operations (such as 
developing basic time schedules and budgets) were completed. 
Then, a mailing list, as accurate and up-to-date as possible, was 
assembled for mailing the right questionnaire to the right 
respondent at the right address. 



The IRS maintains a list of names and addresses of legal 
entities employing one or more workers and distinctively 
identified by an El (employer identification) number. The SSA 
has a similar file, with El numbers, which contains a coded 
description of each firm's type of business activity. The Census 
Bureau secured copies of these two files and matched them to 
derive a file of names and addresses, with associated type of 
business activity. For the single-unit firms (those operating only 
one establishment), this list basically satisfied Census Bureau 
requirements. However, additional information was needed to 
compile a mailing list of establishments of multiunit firms 
(companies which operate more than one establishment, such as 
chain stores or large concerns with establishments engaged in 
manufacturing, retail trade, etc.). The Bureau therefore 
conducted a "precanvass" of about 73,000 multiunit 
companies, asking them to provide names and addresses and 
other pertinent information about their establishments. 

Mechanical devices at Bureau headquarters and the Jefferson- 
ville, Ind., Census Operations Division were used extensively to 
prepare and assemble census questionnaires and related 
materials for mailout. For example, high-speed printers were 
used to prepare mailing labels, and a Cheshire labeling machine 
to affix the labels to mailing packages. Computers were 
programed to assign a geographic code (derived from several 
address reference files) to each establishment mailing address. 
Establishments that reported that their physical location 
differed from their mailing address were later recoded so that 
the geographic code would reflect the physical location. 
Geographic codes were necessary for the tabulation of data for 
States, counties, cities, and special statistical areas. 

Questionnaires were mailed from the Jeffersonville Census 
Operations Division during the period January through April 
1968. Returned questionnaires and correspondence were 
checked in at Jeffersonville beginning in February 1968. Check- 
in information was punched on punchcards and transmitted 
through a telephone-computer linkup to Bureau headquarters, 
where a computerized record was maintained of each re- 
spondent's check-in status (i.e., whether the respondent had 
filed a completed questionnaire, or some other correction of the 
record was required). Six followups were conducted (the first in 
May 1968 and the last in October 1968) to remind 
"delinquents" (companies which had not returned question- 
naires) of the legal reporting requirements. 

The completed questionnaires underwent extensive clerical 
and mechanical processing. A preliminary visual scanning 
identified obviously deficient reports and reports needing 
clarification. These problem cases were resolved by further 
contact with the respondents, where necessary. Next the data 
were transcribed to punchcards, transmitted to the Census 
Bureau's Suitland, Md., headquarters through the telephone- 
computer linkup, and transferred to computer tapes. All 
computer processing, review of the tabulated data, and prepara- 
tion of the publications were performed at Bureau headquarters. 
All records underwent a detailed computer edit (review and 
analysis), and records containing significant problems were 
rejected. These were then reviewed analytically and, where 
necessary, further contacts were made with the respondent. 

At the same time, IRS was providing census information 
from 1967 tax returns. A considerable amount of data was 
conveniently available on computer tape, but some tax returns 
had to be microfilmed at the seven IRS service centers. The 



microfilm reels were forwarded to Jeffersonville, and the data 
were transcribed to punchcards and transmitted to Bureau head- 
quarters. 

The administrative records data and the information report- 
ed on census questionnaires were consolidated in computerized 
data files. Programs were then run on the computers to extract 
from the data files the tabulations required for publication. In 
most cases, the statistical tables were produced by high-speed 
printers, at rates of up to 720 lines per minute. The computers 
were also programed to perform "disclosure analysis" (a proce- 
dure for ascertaining that published statistical summaries would 
not disclose information furnished by an individual company). 
The tabulations were carefully reviewed by experienced subject- 
matter analysts at several stages before they were released for 
publication. Statistical tables were published with appropriate 
graphics and texts in various preliminary and final reports. 

CONDUCTING THE CENSUSES IN 
OUTLYING AREAS 

Economic censuses were also taken in Puerto Rico, Guam, and 
the Virgin Islands. In Puerto Rico, censuses of business, 
construction industries, and manufactures were conducted; in 
the Virgin Islands, censuses of business, manufactures, and 
mineral industries; and in Guam, censuses of business and manu- 
factures. 

The Puerto Rico censuses, which consisted of a combined 
mail/personal-interview canvass, were a joint project of the 
Census Bureau and the Puerto Rico Planning Board of the Com- 
monwealth Government. The mailing register was prepared on 
the basis of (1) IRS records of companies required to file 
quarterly tax returns, and (2) a precanvass of multiunit firms. 

Manufactures and construction census questionnaires were 
distributed and returned by mail, as were business census 
questionnaires for all wholesale establishments and larger retail 
and service establishments. However, data for small retail and 
service establishments (many of which are nonemployers who 
are not required to file IRS quarterly tax returns) were collected 
in personal interviews by enumerators hired and trained under 
the auspices of the Puerto Rico Planning Board. 

The Puerto Rico Planning Board assumed major respon- 
sibility for mailout, receipt and check-in operations, followup of 
nonrespondents, and clerical processing of returns. The returns 
were ultimately forwarded to the Jeffersonville Census Opera- 
tions Division, where data were transcribed to punchcards and 
transmitted to Census Bureau headquarters for computer 
processing and preparation for publication. 

In the Virgin Islands, the 1967 censuses were also taken by a 
combination of mail and personal enumeration. Questionnaires 
were mailed to in-scope establishments included on a business 
license list maintained by the Virgin Islands government 
(supplemented and verified by information in SSA records). 
There were two mailouts of reminder notices to nonre- 
spondents, and a crew of Census Bureau staff members 
conducted personal followups to secure reports from the 
unusually large number of firms that did not respond to the 
reminder notices. 

The Guam censuses were taken entirely by personal enumera- 
tion. Enumerators appointed by the Governor of Guam 
canvassed all roads, obtaining reports from places where a 



business was found to have been in operation during calendar 
year 1967. 

The questionnaires for both Guam and the Virgin Islands 
underwent preliminary screening on the islands, after which 
they were returned to Census Bureau headquarters for detailed 
review and editing, assignment of codes (geographic, kind- 
of-business, etc.), and extraction of data for publication. 

ENTERPRISE STATISTICS PROGRAM 

The enterprise statistics project is essentially a statistical 
byproduct of the censuses of business, manufactures, mineral 
industries, and construction industries. It involves regrouping 
(through extensive use of computers) the statistics collected 
from establishments in order to show the economic charac- 
teristics of the enterprises (companies) that own or control 
these establishments. Statistics for the enterprise-establishment 
relationship were tabulated by type of company organization, 
by company size, and by industry classification, as well as by 
cross-tabulations which reveal company industrial diversification 
patterns. The characteristics of one special group of establish- 
ments, central administrative offices and auxiliaries (such as 
sales offices or research and development laboratories), were 
examined in detail in a separate publication. A statistical link 
was developed between the establishment data collected by the 
Census Bureau and the corporation statistics compiled by IRS. 

CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 

The 1967 Census of Construction Industries, the first since 
1939, was reinstituted in response to an increasing demand for 
census statistics (such as payroll and employment data) for the 
construction industries, as opposed to data on housing starts, 
building permits, etc., which are collected in regular surveys. 

A small-scale pretest was conducted prior to the censuses to 
evaluate the response rate, to ascertain the respondents' ability 
to understand the questions and answer them with relative ease 
and accuracy, and to test the Census Bureau's ability to process 
the data efficiently. Based on the favorable results obtained 
from this pretest, the decision was made to proceed with the 
census of the construction industries, using data-collection and 
processing procedures generally similar to those employed in the 
censuses of business, manufactures, and mineral industries. 

Nonemployers were not required to complete census reports; 
data for nonemployers were extracted from administrative 
records. The basic source of the employer mailing list was the 
IRS listing of firms required to file quarterly tax returns, sup- 
plemented by SSA information on business classification. For 
multiunit enterprises, construction firms were included with the 
business, mining, and manufacturing firms in the previously 
described precanvass. Not all of the construction employers 
were asked to complete questionnaires. From a universe of more 
than 400,000 employers, a sample of about 125,000 was 
selected to receive questionnaires. This sample consisted of all 
multiunit companies, all single-unit companies with payrolls 
equivalent to 10 employees or more, and a sample of single-unit 
firms with fewer than 1 employees. The sampling rate for these 
smaller companies varied from 4 percent to 95 percent, and data 
obtained from the sampled respondents were inflated and 
combined with information from the multiunits and large single 
units to present statistics for all construction establishments 
with employees. 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 

The 1967 Census of Transportation consisted of three major 
projects: the National Travel Survey, the Truck Inventory and 
Use Survey, and the Commodity Transportation Survey. Each 
survey was conducted separately and independently. 

The National Travel Survey provides profiles of the volume 
and characteristics of travel by the civilian propulation of the 
United States. It measures national and regional travel patterns 
and their relationships to the socioeconomic characteristics of 
persons who travel. The respondents consisted of a nationwide 
probability sample of about 18,000 households who reported 
quarterly by mail on trips taken during 1967. 

The Truck Inventory and Use Survey provides statistics on 
the Nation's truck resources (other than vehicle owned by 
Federal, State, and local government agencies) such as number 
of trucks, occupational use of trucks, measures of vehicle 
utilization, and geographic distribution of vehicles. The survey 
was based on a probability sample of about 120,000 trucks 
selected from approximately 15 million registrations on file 
with motor vehicle departments in the 50 States and the District 
of Columbia. Questionnaires were mailed to the owner of each 
truck selected for the sample. 

The Commodity Transportation Survey presents data on 
intercity shipments of commodities by manufacturers in the 
United States. Statistics were collected from a probability 
sample of about 1.4 million bills of lading or other shipping 
documents. These documents were selected from the files of 
approximately 13,000 manufacturers representing the universe 
of about 100,000 plants with 20 or more employees. In most 
cases, company employees did the actual sampling and 
recording of information following detailed instructions and 
using report forms provided by the Census Bureau. 



CENSUS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 

At the recommendation of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, 
the census of commercial fisheries was resumed in 1963 after a 
54-year hiatus. Favorable reaction to the 1963 census led to a 
decision to include commercial fisheries in the 1967 Economic 
Censuses. The 1967 questionnaire, designed and field tested 
cooperatively by the Census Bureau and Bureau of Commercial 
Fisheries, closely resembled its 1963 counterpart. There were a 
few new items, and wording of questions had to be modified 
because the 1967 questionnaire related to the activities of a 
vessel instead of a fishing establishment, as in 1963. 

Questionnaires were mailed to vessel operators (with one or 
more employees) whose names and addresses appeared on a 
mailing list prepared jointly by the U.S. Coast Guard and the 
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. Questionnaires were returned 
to Census Bureau headquarters, where they were checked in and 
edited and tabulations were prepared for publication. Three 
followups were conducted to remind nonrespondents of the 
legal reporting requirement. 

Plans for the 1967 census provided that some basic statistics 
for nonemployers would be extracted from IRS and SSA ad- 
ministrative records. However, because of serious classification 
problems, it was decided not to publish the 1967 data for non- 
employers. 



VI 



CHAPTER 



1 



INTRODUCTION 



The mission of the Bureau of the Census of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce is to provide basic statistics about the 
people and the economy of the Nation in order to assist the 
Congress, the executive branch, and the public generally. The 
most recent economic censuses, conducted in 1968, covered 
1967 activities in manufacturers, mineral industries, business 
(retail, wholesale, and service trades), commercial fisheries, 
transportation, and construction. Data were compiled for the 
United States, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. 

Economic activities not covered in the 1967 censuses 
included agriculture, forestry, insurance, real estate, com- 
munications, utilities, and professional services (such as medical 
and other health services, and accounting, auditing, and book- 
keeping). However, law firms, architects, and engineers were 
included. In addition, government owned and operated 
establishments (except liquor stores operated by State and local 
governments) were considered out of scope for the economic 
censuses, as were nonprofit membership organizations. Govern- 
ment owned but privately operated establishments were 
covered, however. 

Title 13 of the United States Code specifies the frequency of 
the censuses, the kinds of activities to be covered, the obligation 
to report, the confidentiality of returns, and the penalties for 
failure to report. Economic censuses are required by law to be 
taken every 5 years, and Section 131 of Title 13, enacted in 
1964, further specifies that they be conducted at 5-year 
intervals covering years ending in 2 and 7. Title 13 also provides 
that information reported to the Census Bureau (1 ) may be used 
only for statistical purposes, (2) may not be published or other- 
wise disclosed in such a way that data for any individual firm 
can be identified, and (3) may not be used for purposes of 
taxation, investigation, or regulation. Section 195 of Title 13 
authorizes the use of sampling techniques in conducting 
censuses. 

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

The first economic census of the United States was part of the 
decennial census of 1810, when inquiries on manufacturing 
were included with the census of population. All other 
decennial censuses through 1900, except the one in 1830, 
carried some questions on manufacturing. In 1902, Congress 
authorized a quinquennial census of manufacturing to begin 
with 1904; this census was conducted at 5-year intervals from 
1905 through 1920, each covering the preceding year, and every 
other year for the years 1921 through 1939. During World War 
II, periodic censuses were temporarily replaced by war-related 
current surveys, but censuses of manufacturing were resumed 
after the war and were taken for 1947, 1954, 1958, 1963, and 
1967. 



Questions on mining first appeared in the decennial census of 
1840. Thereafter, a census was taken at 10-year intervals from 
1850 to 1880, for the years 1889, 1902, 1909, 1919, 1929, 
1935, 1939, and concurrently with the census of manufactures 
since 1954. 

Although some business-related data were collected in the 
decennial census of 1840, the first census of business was taken 
for the year 1929. This included only retail and wholesale trade, 
but beginning with the second business census, for 1933, various 
service trades have also been included. Business censuses were 
also taken for 1935 and 1939, and, after a wartime interruption, 
for 1948, 1954, 1958, 1963, and 1967. 

Data on the construction industry were collected in the 
censuses of business covering the years 1929, 1935, and 1939. 
World War II temporarily suspended this operation, however, 
and when business censuses were resumed after the war, 
coverage of construction industries was not included. Collection 
of census data on this subject was reinstituted for 1967. 

Censuses of commercial fisheries were conducted in 1880, 
1889, and 1908, followed by a 56 year hiatus until 1964, when 
the Census Bureau, working in close cooperation with the 
Department of the Interior's Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, 
collected information on this subject for the year 1963. Com- 
mercial fisheries were also a part of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses. 

No formal transportation censuses were taken in this country 
until 1963, although the decennial censuses of 1850, 1860, 
1880, and 1890 all provided some statistics on rail and water 
transportation. The Census Bureau collected information on 
water transportation periodically until 1926 and on street 
railways and buses until 1937. The first transportation census 
was conducted as part of the 1963 Economic Censuses, and a 
slightly modified transportation census was also part of the 
1967 Economic Censuses. 

The first economic census for outlying areas was a census of 
manufactures covering Puerto Rico for the year 1909, only 11 
years after the island was ceded to the the United States by 
Spain. Censuses of manufactures were then taken for Puerto 
Rico at 10-year intervals through 1949, at 2-year intervals for 
the years 1952 through 1958, and for 1963 and 1967. The 
initial census of business for Puerto Rico, covering 1939, was 
taken in conjunction with the decennial census of 1940. Similar 
business censuses covered the years 1949, 1954, 1958, 1963, 
and 1967. For Guam and the Virgin Islands, the 1967 censuses, 
covering manufactures, minerals, and business, were the third in 
a series required by law to be taken every 5 years; the first two 
were for 1958 and 1963. 



1 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



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INTRODUCTION 



SCOPE, COVERAGE, AND 
PRESENTATION OF RESULTS 

The 1967 Census of Business covered establishments primarily 
engaged in retail trade, wholesale trade, and selected services 
(hotels and motels; personal, repair, and business services; and 
amusement and recreation services, including the motion picture 
industry). Also included were public warehouses, dental labora- 
tories, and, in the 1967 census for the first time, law firms, 
architectural and engineering firms, and travel agencies. Truck 
and bus carriers not subject to economic regulation of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission were also included; in 1963 
these activities were included in the census of transportation. In 
general, the census of business collected information on number 
of establishments, payrolls, employment, sales, and receipts. 
Tabulations were also prepared on retail sales by merchandise 
line, major retail centers, and other special subjects. 

The 1967 Census of Construction Industries, a major ad- 
dition to the 1967 economic censuses, obtained statistics for 
general building trade contractors, heavy construction con- 
tractors, special trade contractors, subdividers, developers 
(except of cemetery lots), and operative builders. Data were 
collected on business receipts; employment; payrolls; expendi- 
tures for materials, components, and supplies; expenditures for 
rental of machinery and equipment; payments to subcon- 
tractors; capital expenditures; number of housing units started; 
and distribution of construction receipts by type of construc- 
tion, location of construction, ownership of construction 
(public or private), and class of construction (new, maintenance, 
or repairs). 

The manufacturing industries, as defined for the purposes of 
the 1967 Census of Manufactures, included establishments 
primarily engaged in the mechanical or chemical transformation 
of materials or substances into new products. These establish- 
ments are commonly referred to as plants, factories, mills, and 
sometimes shops. Also included in the manufacturing category 
were establishments engaged in assembling component parts or 
subassemblies into new products if the resulting product was 
not a structure. The census of manufactures generally collected 
data on number of establishments, payroll, employment, man- 
hours worked, cost of materials, specific materials consumed, 
value of shipments, shipments of individual products, value 
added by manufacture, expenditures for plant and equipment, 
and end-of-year inventories. 

The 1967 Census of Mineral Industries covered establish- 
ments engaged in mining, developing mines, or exploring for 
minerals. Also included were establishments providing contract 
services, including exploration or development services, for 
mining firms at the mine, development, or exploration site. 
Mining was broadly defined to encompass extraction of minerals 
occurring naturally, quarrying, well operations, and milling and 
mineral beneficiation (crushing, screening, washing, and flota- 
tion) typically performed at the mine site. In general, the census 
of mineral industries produced statistics on number of establish- 
ments, payroll, employment, man-hours worked, cost of 
supplies and purchased machinery, specific supplies used and 
minerals prepared, capital expenditures, value of shipments, 
individual mineral products, shipments and production, and 
value added in mining. 

The 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries included all com- 
mercial fishing operators primarily engaged in the catching (or 
taking) of finfish, shellfish, whales, and other fish and marine 
life. Data were collected on number of operators, employment. 



payroll, receipts, characteristics of vessels (such as cost and year 
purchased or built), ports where catch was sold, operating costs, 
and utilization of vessel time. 

In the 1967 Census of Transportation, the National Travel 
Survey was concerned with the volume and characteristics of 
travel by residents of the United States; the Truck Inventory 
and Use Survey yielded data on the Nation's truck resources, 
other than vehicles owned by Federal, State, and local govern- 
ments; and the Commodity Transportation Survey produced 
data on the transportation and geographic distribution of 
commodities shipped intercity (i.e., beyond the local area) by 
manufacturing plants. A survey of truck and bus carriers not 
subject to economic regulation by the Interstate Commerce 
Commission was a part of the 1963 transportation census, but 
was transferred to the business census for 1967 because of the 
basic similarity of the carriers to other service industries covered 
in the business census. 

In general, information collected in the 1967 Economic 
Censuses was presented by kind of business or industry (or 
other economic activity), by geographic location (such as State 
or county), and by other classification, such as amount of sales, 
employment, legal form of organization, and degree of 
specialization. In addition, the data collected for establishments 
were regrouped for an "enterprise" statistics program, which 
showed various characteristics of the companies that owned or 
controlled these establishments. 

COMPANY-ESTABLISHMENT DATA 

Statistics for the economic censuses traditionally have been 
collected and published in terms of the establishment. An 
establishment, as defined for census purposes, is an economic 
unit that produces or distributes goods or services, and, in most 
instances, is at a single physical location. 1 

When more than one business is conducted at a single 
location, each business under separate ownership is regarded as a 
separate establishment. Furthermore, if different kinds of 
business are conducted by a firm at a single location, each kind 
of business is treated as a separate establishment if separate 
records are available, and if the size of the activities are 
significant. 

A separate report is obtained for each establishment at which 
a company operates a business whose primary activity falls 
within the scope of the economic censuses (operating establish- 
ments). In addition, establishments functioning primarily to 
administer, service, or support the activities of the operating 
establishments of those companies are also identified and 
included in the census as central administrative offices (CAO's) 
and auxiliaries. 

It is generally more convenient, for both the Census Bureau 
and the business community, for the Bureau to obtain 
individual establishment reports on a centralized basis from the 
main office of each multiunit company (a company operating 
more than one establishment). In order to mail the proper 
number and type of census questionnaires to each company, to 



The 1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Indus- 
tries included the following numbers of establishments (in thousands): 

Census of Business, total 3,262 

Retail Trade 1 ,763 

Selected Services 1,188 

Wholesale Trade 31 1 

Census of Manufactures 31 1 

Census of Mineral Industries 29 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



obtain the information about the company-establishment 
relationship necessary to determine whether the tabulated 
census totals could be published without revealing data for 
individual companies, and for various tabulation purposes, the 
Bureau conducted a precanvass of known multiunit companies 
in the year preceding the census. This precanvass yielded in- 
formation about the organizational structure of each large 
company within the scope of the censuses. 



respondents would be able to use some data already compiled 
for tax purposes to complete their census questionnaires. 

Unfortunately, this extension failed to reduce significantly 
the number of delinquent returns but did delay the receipt of 
questionnaires and the processing schedule. By late June 1968, 
only 73 percent of the returns had been received instead of the 
approximately 90 percent returned by the corresponding time 
in the 1963 Economic Censuses. 



INNOVATIONS 

Expanding the Scope and Coverage of the Censuses 

In addition to expanding the 1967 Census of Business to cover, 
law firms, architectural and engineering firms, and travel 
agencies, there were other changes in the scope and coverage of 
the various censuses. For example, in the 1967 Census of 
Mineral Industries, single-unit establishments without paid 
employees were excluded because of the difficulty in developing 
a mailing list for these mines (and because their effect on 
industry aggregates is slight in most cases). In the 1954, 1958, 
and 1963 mineral industries censuses, mines without employees 
were included if they reported more than $500 in vaiue of 
shipments and receipts, cost of supplies and purchased machin- 
ery, or capital expenditures. The scope of the 1967 Commodity 
Transportation Survey, part of the transportation census, was 
also modified. For 1967, intercity shipments of manufacturing 
plants with 20 employees or more were represented whereas the 
1963 survey represented all establishments, irrespective of size. 
(In 1963, it was found that plants with fewer than 20 workers 
generated only 4 percent of total tons of intercity shipments.) 

Increasing Use of Administrative Records 

Beginning with the 1954 Economic Censuses, the Bureau of the 
Census has been obtaining census information from the tax and 
social security records (termed "administrative records" because 
they were obtained for the purpose of administering programs 
rather than for compilation of statistics) maintained by the 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Social Security Admin- 
istration (SSA). By refining and expanding the use of ad- 
ministrative records in the 1967 censuses (primarily by using 
these records for selected firms having few employees in 
addition to firms with no employees), about three million small 
firms were relieved of the task of completing census question- 
naires. Overall, data for approximately 60 percent of the 
establishments included in the scope of the censuses were 
obtained through the use of these records. Although large in 
number, these small establishments account for only about 7 
percent of total sales. 

Extending Reporting Date for Respondents 

The deadline for respondents to return their 1967 Economic 
Censuses questionnaires was April 30, 1968, about 2 months 
later in the year than the February 29, 1964, reporting date 
established for the 1963 censuses. The Census Bureau, 
recognizing that respondents were extremely busy during the 
first few months of the calendar year with Federal and State 
income tax returns and other reporting requirements, hoped 
that this extension would increase the accuracy of census 
reports and reduce the number of delinquent returns without 
unduly delaying census publications schedules. In addition, 



Changes in Processing Methods 

The most important changes in the methods of processing 1967 
Economic Censuses data were the various new techniques that 
had to be devised for handling mass data, because of the 
increased use of administrative records. Other significant 
changes included the expansion of the geographic coding file to 
facilitate computer coding of establishments located in small 
cities, development of specifications and programs to allow the 
computer to perform complementary disclosure analysis to 
assure that statistics for individual establishments were not 
disclosed, and the extended use of computer editing to replace 
operations previously done manually. 

CENSUS FUNDS 

The 1964 revision of the census law requiring that economic 
censuses be taken for years ending in 2 and 7, instead of the 
years 3 and 8 as formerly required, meant that the censuses 
previously scheduled to cover 1968 (5 years after the 1963 
census) would instead cover 1967. Congress therefore ap- 
propriated initial funds to become available at the beginning of 
the 1966 fiscal year (July 1, 1965). 

The cost of the 1967 Economic Censuses was originally 
estimated to be approximately the same as that of the 1963 
operation ($19.6 million), adjusted for wage and price increases. 
Under this criteria, cost estimates prepared on the basis of 1965 
planning and approved and appropriated by Congress totaled 
$21 million. Government-wide salary raises later increased the 
budget allocation for the 1967 censuses to $22.6 million. Most 
expenditures, approximately $21.6 million, occurred in the 
5-year period encompassing fiscal years 1966 to 1970. About $1 
million was allocated in fiscal year 1971 to complete the 
publication of census results. The peak spending periods were 
fiscal years 1968 and 1969 (July 1967 to June 1969), during 
which approximately $14.2 million were spent. 

Obligational Authority and Actual Obligations 
1967 Economic Censuses 



Fiscal year 


New obligational 
authority ($1,000) 


Obligations' 
($1,000) 


1966 


1,150 
3,000 
7,497 
7,085 
3,860 

22,592 


823 


1967 


2,899 


1 968 


7,117 


1 969 


7,089 


1970 


3,692 


1971 (6 months) 


954 
22,574 



'Government agencies are permitted to enter into obligations 
requiring either immediate or future payment of money only when they 
have been granted authority to do so by Congress. New obligational 
authority allocates money to Federal agencies to pay salaries and 
purchase services, supplies, equipment, etc. 



INTRODUCTION 



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1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



TABLE 1. Functions of Divisions of the Bureau of the Census in the 1967 Economic Censuses 



Divisions 


Principal functions in 1967 economic censuses 


Subject-matter divisions: 
Business 
Industry 

Construction Statistics 
Transportation 


Primarily concerned with the subject content of the various censuses and 
special surveys (Business Division for the census of business; Industry 
Division for the censuses of manufactures, mineral industries, and 
commercial fisheries; Construction Statistics Division for the census of 
construction; and Transportation Division for the census of 
transportation). Major functions included consultation with data users, 
trade associations, and respondents on questionnaire content; designing 
and testing questionnaires; participation in planning data-collection and 
data-processing methods; preparation of instructions to respondents and 
specifications for processing returns; resolving data-collection problems; 
planning the publications and writing analytical and explanatory text; and 
professional review of the tables before publication. 


Administrative and Publications Services 


Secured space, supplies, and equipment; arranged for communications, 
transportation, and related requirements; provided for printing of forms 
and publications; supplied art, editorial, and copy-preparation services for 
publications. 


Budget and Finance 


Responsible for accounting, payroll, financial planning and control; 
coordinated budget estimates and their justification; furnished general 
staff guidance and assistance in areas of finance, budgeting, and 
accounting. 


Field 


Directed those segments of the transportation census and supplemental 
surveys that were conducted by personal enumeration through the 
Bureau's field offices. 


General Economic Statistics 1 


Performed various economic censuses staff coordinating functions (1) 
through its Enterprise Statistics Coordinator, who served as chairman of 
the Census Common Questions Coordinating Committee, and (2) through 
its Industry and Commodity Classification Coordinator, whose 
interdivisional committee implemented all revisions of the industrial 
classification systems used in the economic censuses. The Enterprise 
Statistics staff of the division was responsible for planning, processing, and 
publishing the enterprise statistics derived from the 1967 censuses 
establishment data. It also had major responsibility for -processing 
multiunit company statistics in the precanvass and in the actual censuses. 


General Reports 2 


Advised on legislation for the censuses and on legal aspects of the 
operation. Provided documentation of the censuses which is summarized in 
this procedural history. 


Geography 


Determined the boundaries of the various geographic areas by which the 
economic census data were tabulated for publication; planned the graphic 
materials and provided maps and statistical charts for census publications. 


Jeffersonville Census Operations 


Performed large-scale clerical and manual operations, such as labeling 
questionnaires and assembling mailing packages; checking in and 
performing precomputer editing of returns; card-punching returns; 
clerically reviewing computer-edited reject records and preparing 
correction records; and handling correspondence related to these 
operations. 



'This division was created in May 1970 by combining the functions of the Enterprise Statistics staff of what was formerly the Statistical Analysis 
Division and the County Business Patterns function of the Business Division. The Industry and Commodity Classification Staff was made a separate 
organization; until May 1970, it was part of the Statistical Analysis Division. 



Until May 1970, Statistical Information Division. 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE 1. Functions of Divisions of the Bureau of the Census in the 1967 Economic Censuses— Continued 



Divisions 


Principal functions in 1967 economic censuses 


Management and Organization 


Established production standards and furnished general management 
guidance and assistance. 


Personnel 


Formulated personnel policies; recruited personnel; provided guidance in 
applying personnel regulations; classified jobs; reviewed changes in 
assignment; directed employee services. 


Processing 


Coordinated and directed the Bureau's electronic digital computer and 
mechanical tabulating operations; provided clerical support activities in the 
processing of statistical data; implemented the application of new 
developments and techniques in data processing. 


Public Information Office 


Directed the information and publicity programs for the censuses. 


Statistical Research 


In cooperation with the Office of the Associate Director for Research and 
Development, provided technical direction of the research, statistical 
standards, and evaluation activity including response research, quality 
control, and sample design. Also provided guidance on all aspects of 
mathematical, statistical, and quality-control research problems. 


Systems 


Planned and developed technical operational specif ications and procedures 
for the processing of statistical data; planned and monitored clerical, 
mechanical, and electronic digital computer systems processing; planned 
and coordinated application of new techniques for processing statistical 
data. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CENSUS BUREAU 2 

The Bureau of the Census is organized under a Director; a 
Deputy Director; five Associate Directors responsible for 
economic fields, demographic fields, research and development, 
data processing systems, and administration; and three Assistant 
Directors responsible for program development, statistical 
information, and international statistical programs. The 
Bureau's organizational structure consists of four types of 
functional divisions in addition to the Director's staff: 

1. Subject-matter divisions, which assume direct respon- 
sibility for censuses, surveys, and other projects in their 
respective disciplines (industry, business, etc.) 

2. Statistical service divisions which perform services for all 
Bureau programs in such areas as mathematical, statistical, 
and economic analysis; statistical methodology; research 
and development; and mapping and graphic presentation 

3. Data processing divisions, responsible for clerical, mechan- 
ical, and electronic processing systems and operations 



2 

In August 1971, the Bureau of the Census was significantly reorga- 
nized. Under the new structure, the computer programers, methods, 
procedures, and quality control staffs, and clerical processing staffs were 
reassigned to the subject-matter divisions, thereby giving these division 
chiefs more control of and responsibility for the various phases of their 
projects. Although this reorganization is expected to have major ramifi- 
cations for the 1972 Economic Censuses, it was not in effect during the 
1967 Economic Censuses. The organizational structure described here is 
that which was in effect during most of the 1 967 census operations. 



4. Administrative services divisions, responsible for census 
field operations; personnel management; budget and fiscal 
programs; procurement and property management; print- 
ing, publication, and library services; and management 
analysis 

The Associate Director for Economic Fields had overall 
responsibility for administering the 1967 Economic Censuses. 
He was assisted by the four subject-matter divisions directly 
involved in the censuses— the Business, Industry, Transportation, 
and Construction Statistics Divisions— and by representatives of 
other divisions with direct responsibility for various phases of 
the project, such as the Systems, Processing, and General 
Economic Statistics Divisions. An Economic Censuses Coordi- 
nator was appointed to act as a general "trouble shooter" for 
the operation, performing such tasks as analyzing work flow, 
preparing budget allocations, identifying problem areas, and 
reporting progress in relation to expenditures. 

While there is a permanent staff to provide supporting 
services, individual censuses are staffed and funded as temporary 
projects. The census coordinator and the subject-matter 
divisions prepare technical specifications and arrange for neces- 
sary services from the regular organizational units of the Census 
Bureau, which furnish cost estimates and time schedules. 
Subject-matter specialists and the census coordinator maintain 
full technical direction, approve estimates and time schedules, 
evaluate progress and quality, and review and approve the final 
census reports for publication. 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Various divisions of the Bureau worked in close cooperation 
to complete the many tasks related to the 1967 Economic 
Censuses. The functions of these divisions are described in table 
1, pages 6 and 7. 

PLANNING COMMITTEES 

Since many of the operations common to all of the economic 
censuses involved the use of company and establishment 
records, it was necessary to determine the exact relationship of 
these records to their counterparts maintained by the IRS and 
the SSA. 

In July 1964, a "Coordinating Committee on Company 
Statistics Programs" was established within the Census Bureau 
and assigned the tasks of coordinating the efforts to determine 
these relationships, assuring consistency in the resultant 
company statistics, and deriving maximum benefit from these 
statistics. This committee included key personnel from the 
Business, Construction Statistics, Systems, Statistical Analysis, 
and Industry Divisions and was augmented as necessary by ad- 
ditional staff members from these divisions and from other 
divisions involved in the economic censuses, such as the Trans- 
portation and Processing Divisions. Generally, the committee 
recommended policies and procedures it deemed necessary to 
achieve consistency among the programs of the participating 
divisions. 

In January 1965, the committee began meeting weekly to 
discuss plans, progress, and problems of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses. Plans were formulated for integrating common 
elements of the several censuses (business, manufactures, 
mineral industries, construction, and transportation) in order to 
consolidate as many of the census operations as possible. For 
example, mailing lists would be updated by conducting a single 
precanvass of the multiunit firms to be included in the censuses 
of business, manufactures, and mineral industries; and mailing 
the check-in of census questionnaires, followup of overdue 
returns, geographic coding, and handling of correspondence 
would be consolidated. 

Beginning in fiscal year 1966 (starting on July 1, 1965), this 
committee became more involved in specific planning for the 
1967 censuses, particularly in the designing of questionnaires to 
be used. It was redesignated the "Census Common Questions 
Coordinating Committee," but its membership remained the 
same. 



1. Employer identification number— In the 1963 censuses, 
the question on this item was omitted from the business 
census questionnaires sent to multiunit firms, and this 
omission resulted in serious problems in processing these 
questionnaires. Companies with more than one employer 
identification number had difficulty in reconciling em- 
ployment totals reported on these questionnaires with the 
"control" totals reported by employer identification 
number on the company summary report (form NC-K1). 
The question on employer identification number was 
included in the 1967 censuses questionnaires. 

2. Period of operation— For the 1967 censuses, the question 
on period of operation was revised so that respondents 
would provide all information required for census publica- 
tions on whether the firm was in operation all of 1967 or 
only part of the year. This helped eliminate some of the 
problems encountered during the 1963 censuses in identi- 
fying firms operating in seasonal businesses. 

3. Certification— The certification question required the 
authorized company official to sign and date the question- 
naire and "certify" its accuracy. Also asked for inclusive 
dates of operation of the establishment and was similar in 
format to the certification question appearing on the 
report of company organization (form NC-X1). 

4. Legal form of organization— The parenthetical instruc- 
tions for corporations were amplified to indicate that 
their divisional or subsidiary establishments should also be 
marked as corporations for the purposes of the 1967 
censuses. In the 1963 censuses, almost 1,000 large 
multiunit companies had checked the legal form of 
ownership code 9, "Other," for a number of subsidiary or 
divisional establishments not at the same plant, store, or 
office location. If the parent organization was a corpora- 
tion, subsidiaries should also have been considered cor- 
porations. 

In addition to revising identification items that were 
common to the different censuses, the Census Common 
Questions Coordinating Committee devised standard instruction 
sheets, transmittal letters, and label format, and developed 
standardized definition of some items, including total employ- 
ment, payroll, name, physical location, and capital expendi- 
tures. Inquiries concerning distribution of manufacturers' sales 
were coordinated, and specifications for cross-census inquiries 
(such as census of manufactures inquiries appearing on census of 
business questionnaires) were carefully reviewed. 



In July 1965, this committee was assigned the primary tasks 
of developing the overall plan for the use of administrative 
records, standardizing common elements of the census question- 
naires, and developing plans and specifications for coordinating 
all multiunit company operations related to the 1967 censuses. 
The committee also devised standard language for use in identi- 
fying "general" data items for which common concepts and 
definitions could be applied in the several censuses. 

Much of the committee's time was devoted to standardizing 
identification items, 3 including the following: 



"Identification" items are inquiries on name and physical location of 
the respondent, legal form of ownership, and other items used to identify 
the establishment, as opposed to "data" or "content" items, which ask 
for specific information on items covered in the censuses, such as sales, 
employment, and payroll. 



One of the extensive revisions was in the instructions to 
respondents for completing form NC-X1 (Report of Company 
Organization). The revision was intended to insure that the pre- 
canvass (see "Developing the Mailing List for Multiunit 
Companies: The Precanvass," chapter 3, p. 17) would identify 
companies with agricultural activities and indicate the extent of 
those activities. This was an initial step in identifying company- 
operated farms and agricultural service establishments to be 
enumerated in the 1969 Census of Agriculture. 

The Census Common Questions Coordinating Committee 
also developed an understanding among the Census Bureau 
divisions participating in the censuses of what would be 
available on computer tapes and in other records to be made 
available by the IRS for firms with few or no employees. The 
committee clarified general principles and concepts that had to 



INTRODUCTION 



be spelled out as well as general specifications for the use of the 
records. (See "Planning the Use of Data From Administrative 
Records," chapter 2, p. 12.) 

Finally, the committee developed a plan for review of all or 
part of the multiunit complex company returns, ASM 
companies (companies covered in the Annual Survey of Manu- 
factures, which provides key measures of manufacturing activity 
for intercensal years), and other selected cases of special con- 
cern. 

An "Economic Censuses Systems Committee," composed of 
representatives from subject-matter, data-processing, and 
statistical service divisions, was formed in November 1965 and 
met periodically thereafter. Its purpose was to coordinate and 
implement systems aspects of census operations, defining "how 
to do it" after the subject-matter divisions had determined 
"what was to be done." Most of its work involved data- 
processing and systems analysis problems. 



PROCEDURES MANUALS 

Procedures manuals were prepared for the 1963 Economic 
Censuses and for earlier censuses. However, their role was 
confined mainly to providing instructions for the manual opera- 
tions. With the development and increasing use of electronic 
computers and related equipment, it became evident early in the 
planning stages of the 1967 censuses that the manual operations 
were increasingly being subordinated within a comprehensive 
systems framework. 

Accordingly, the 1967 Economic Censuses Procedures 
Manual consisted of four major parts as follows: I— The System 
at Large; II— The Computer and Electronics Function; III— The 
Manual Process; and IV— The Control of Quality. Each part, in 
turn, consisted of chapters and sections which divided and sub- 
divided the subject matter by systems and divisions. This 
manual was designed to serve as a working tool for conducting 
and expediting the various census operations. 



AUTOMATIC DATA-PROCESSING EQUIPMENT 

The Census Bureau's computing equipment for the 1967 
Economic Censuses consisted of three Univac systems— two 
Univac 1107 systems and one (and later a second) compatible 
Univac 1108 system— supported by auxiliary electronic equip- 
ment: a card-oriented IBM 1401 machine, a tape-oriented 1401 
system, a data transmission system linking the Bureau's 
Washington headquarters with its Census Operations Division in 
Jeffersonville, Ind., four high-speed printers, and a tape-to- 
microfilm printer. The Bureau also had contractual arrange- 
ments with other computer centers to rent time on their 
computers as necessary during peak processing periods. In ad- 
dition, the Bureau utilized a relatively small group of punchcard 
machines to generate much of the input to the processing 
systems. 

Computers 

With expanding workloads and the transfer of programs from 
mechanical to electronic equipment, the Bureau of the Census 
has purchased, leased, or rented time on a succession of 
computers. Following its acquisition in 1951 of Univac I (the 
first large-scale computer, which was designed and built especial- 
ly for the Census Bureau), the Bureau purchased a second 
Univac I in 1955 and acquired two Univac 1105's in 1958. In 



1959, it contributed to the purchase of two additional Univac 
1105's at the University of North Carolina and Chicago's 
Armour Research Foundation as a means of securing additional 
computer time during the 1960 Census of Population and 
Housing. Still another Univac 1105 was leased and installed in 
1962 and used for approximately 2/4 years. Also in 1962, an 
IBM 1401 machine with Univac tape drives permitting con- 
version between IBM and Univac tapes was purchased, and 
another IBM 1401, this one a card-oriented machine, was leased. 
During the following year, 1963, two Univac 1 107 systems were 
purchased and installed. 

A Univac 1 108, with an arithmetic unit six times as fast as 
that of the 1 107, was obtained in 1967, and that year also saw 
the retirement of the last of the 1 105 systems. By that time, the 
Univac I prototype had been retired and placed on exhibit at 
the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of History and 
Technology in recognition of its contribution to the develop- 
ment of computer technology. 

Programer Training 

The Bureau of the Census has been training computer pro- 
gramed for more than 15 years. In 1967,21 training classes for 
179 students were conducted under Bureau auspices. Slightly 
more than half of these trainees were new recruits; the others 
were Bureau employees who were reassigned to programer 
trainee positions after demonstrating via written tests their basic 
aptitude for programing. 

Punchcard Equipment 

The Bureau still uses punchcards as an adjunct to the electronic 
devices. As of December 1967, its complement of punchcard 
equipment consisted of 205 card punches, 69 verifiers, 12 
sorters, four reproducers, three collators, and three accounting 
machines. Innovation of new key punching equipment within 
the past 5 years has included the following developments: 

1. Field memory registers, which permit up to 10 columns 
of information to be retained and punched into a card 
only after the operator is satisfied that the information is 
complete and accurate. 

2. Automatic numbering, which can provide either running 
serialization of an entire deck of punchcards or serializa- 
tion within records for a job consisting of multicard 
records. 

3. Check digit verification, which allows a specified group of 
alphabetic or numeric characters to be retained in 
memory until a prescribed arithmetic check has been 
made. If there is an error, a signal is received by the 
operator in time for him to clear out the erroneous entry 
and repunch it correctly instead of having to reject the 
card and begin again. 

4. "Floating point" recording, which permits the operator to 
punch a given group of numeric symbols as it appears on a 
document, but which records only the first three digits 
followed by a number which is the number of zeros that 
must be added at the end to restore the number to its 
original order of magnitude. Thus, the number 789625 
will appear in the card as 7893, and the number 42 will 
appear as 0420. By using "floating point" recording, 



10 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 




"overflows" (exceeding the storage capacity 
computer) can be avoided. 



of the device), and statistical tables prepared for special purposes but 

not intended for publication. 



High-Speed Printers 

The first of several magnetic tape-oriented "high-speed printers" 
was delivered to the Census Bureau in 1955. These devices, 
operating "off-line" (independently of the computer), convert 
computer output tape to print at the rate of up to 720 lines per 
minute and are able to produce statistical tables in a completed 
format ready for photography and offset reproduction at rates 
up to 400 lines per minute. They can also be used for other 
printing jobs, such as preparing mailing lists, reference-file 
material, memory dumps (listings of the contents of a storage 



Data Transmission 

In January 1964, a high-speed data transmission system was 
installed and used very successfully during the 1963 Economic 
Censuses to transmit information automatically from a card 
transmission terminal at the Census Operations Division in 
Jeffersonville, Ind., to a magnetic tape terminal at Washington, 
via telephone lines leased during the night hours. This data 
transmission system was again utilized in the 1967 censuses. 
Information from about 35 million punchcards was transmitted 
during the 1 967 operations. 



CHAPTER 



2 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 
PLANNING AND PREPARATORY OPERATIONS 



DETERMINING CENSUS CONTENT 

The Bureau of the Census is not free to ask any questions it 
chooses. Each inquiry must be within the authority granted by 
Congress, it must fill an important need for information, and it 
must be one for which respondents can readily provide accurate 
answers. The Bureau has the obligation of satisfying the needs 
of Congress, the executive branch, and the public generally for 
timely and reliable information, while minimizing the cost of 
collecting this information and the reporting responsibilities 
placed on those who must provide it. 

The Census Bureau solicited recommendations from many 
suppliers and users of data collected in the economic censuses. 
These consultations involved Government agencies; individual 
firms; labor unions; trade associations; advisory committees of 
the National Association of Manufacturers, American Mining 
Congress, American Statistical Association, American Marketing 
Association, and American Economic Association; the Govern- 
ment Statistics Committee of the National Retail Merchants 
Association; and the Advisory Council on Federal Reports, a 
group consisting of representatives of almost every major 
economic activity and others with special interests in Govern- 
ment reports. Information applicable to each economic activity 
to be covered in the censuses was developed in close coopera- 
tion with those who would be called upon to supply it, as well 
as those who would make the most use of it. 

Federal agencies with special interests in economic census 
data were asked to review questionnaires and recommend 
changes that would facilitate a coordinated Federal statistics 
program. At the same time, the Census Bureau analyzed proce- 
dures used in previous economic censuses and recent annual 
surveys (such as the Annual Survey of Manufactures) with the 
aim to simplify reporting requirements, expedite processing 
operations, and improve accuracy of results without increasing 
costs. The Census Bureau worked in close cooperation with the 
Bureau of the Budget, 1 which must approve questionnaires 
before funds can be used to collect the information. (See 
appendix B for a complete list of trade associations and Govern- 
ment agencies consulted on content of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses.) 

Users of census data submitted numerous recommendations 
for questions to be asked in the 1967 censuses— many more than 
it was feasible to include. The Census Bureau had to balance 
these requests against the workload on respondents, the nature 
of records already available, and the cost to both Government 
and the business and industrial community. Particular care was 



exercised to include questions which would yield information 
on current economic conditions and at the same time provide, 
where possible, for comparison with data previously collected. 
In the final analysis, questions asked in the 1967 censuses were 
basically the same as those asked in the 1963 censuses; changes 
reflected primarily new products and new industries to be 
added. 

Approximately 440 questionnaires were ultimately designed 
to reflect the economic size and industrial activity of the estab- 
lishments to be canvassed. (See appendix F for a complete list 
of questionnaires.) Questionnaire format was standardized 
wherever possible, and a different color was used to dif- 
ferentiate the questionnaires for each census. Common identi- 
fication questions were used, and data questions were also 
standardized for the various censuses wherever possible. 



SCHEDULING THE WORK 

Several innovations, resulting mainly from the increasing use of 
administrative records maintained by other agencies, required 
elaborate planning and scheduling before the mailout of 
questionnaires to establishments to be canvassed. The following 
tentative target dates were established for the completion of 
census operations: 



'In July 1970, the Bureau of the Budget was redesignated as the 
Office of Management and Budget. 



Operation 

Clearance of census questionnaires (content 

and form) 

Precanvass of multiunit companies for up- 
dating mailing list 

Delivery of printed questionnaires 

Premailing operations (geographic coding, 
packaging, labeling, and related tasks) .... 
Computer programing for basic processing . 
Mailing questionnaires to establishments on 

mailing list 

Mailing to new establishments (Social 

Security Administration "births") 

Check-in and followup of returns 

Processing Internal Revenue Service data 

for companies with no employees 

Clerical processing of returns 

Punching 

Computer editing 

Clerical review and preliminary computer 
tabulations 

Analytical review and correction of com- 
puter tabulations 



Tentative 

completion 

dates 



December 1966 

September 1967 
November 1967 

November 1967 
December 1967 

January 1968 

February 1968 
July 1968 

July 1968 
July 1968 
August 1968 
November 1968 

December 1968 

January 1969 



11 



12 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Throughout the processing period, several progress reviews 
were conducted, and, as is usual in an operation of this scope 
and magnitude, the target completion dates were revised from 
time to time. For actual completion dates, see appendix C, 
p. 1 08. 



PLANNING THE USE OF DATA 
FROM ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS 

Background 

Beginning with the 1954 Economic Censuses, the Bureau of the 
Census has been working in close cooperation with the Internal 
Revenue Service (IRS) and the Social Security Administration 
(SSA) in order to utilize the tax and Social Security records 
maintained by these two agencies. The main objectives have 
been (1) to relieve some firms of the requirement to complete 
census questionnaires by securing information already available 
in administrative records, (2) to provide mailing and sampling 
lists for the Census Bureau's data collection programs, (3) to 
establish new statistical measures, and (4) to check the quality 
of the Bureau's data. 

Federal law requires that all individual proprietorships, 
partnerships, and corporations file income tax returns with IRS. 
In addition, about two-thirds of these firms (those with one or 
more employees) must file payroll tax returns (IRS form 941). 
Both the income tax and payroll tax returns contain some 
information similar in definition and content to that collected 
by the Census Bureau in its economic censuses. 

IRS actually processes these tax returns, but SSA receives 
and maintains information on firms paying payroll taxes so that 
it can furnish necessary data to the Treasury Department for 
proper crediting of payments to the Social Security trust funds. 
SSA also assigns an industrial classification code to each firm 
that has a payroll. Each firm with payroll is assigned an em- 
ployer identification (El) number which is used on income tax 
and payroll tax returns filed by such employers. Firms with no 
paid employees do not have an El number. 

With the cooperation of IRS and SSA, the Census Bureau 
was given access to relevant data on computer tape and on tax 
returns for statistical purposes. Authority for this inspection is 
contained in Executive Order No. 10911, dated January 17, 
1961 , and specific regulations are set forth in Treasury Decision 
No. 6547, approved on the same date. In addition, the regula- 
tions provide that Census Bureau personnel using IRS records 
are informed that the information is confidential and is to be 
treated as both Census Confidential (Section 1905, Title 18) 
and IRS Confidential (IRS, Code, Section 7213). 

Preliminary planning for the use of administrative records in 
the 1967 Economic Censuses began in late 1964. Much of this 
planning revolved around three major changes in the use of 
these records for census purposes: 

1. In the 1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and 
Mineral Industries, administrative records were to be used 
for the first time to obtain census information for 
selected single-unit "small employers" (firms with small 
employment during the census year). In previous 
censuses, all employers had been required to complete 
census questionnaires. 

2. Data for all nonemployers (firms with no paid employees 
during the census year) to be covered in the 1967 Census 
of Business (retail, service, and construction areas) were 
compiled from these records. In the 1963 censuses, a 



50-percent sample of these records was taken and the 
results were multiplied by two to establish census totals. 
(Nonemployer manufacturing firms, mines, and wholesale 
trade firms were not included in the 1967 censuses 
because of their statistical insignificance.) 
3. Information on first quarter payroll and on mid-March 
employment for all single-unit firms to be covered in the 
1967 business census was to be obtained from administra- 
tive records. In past censuses, respondents had to be asked 
to supply information on their mid-November employ- 
ment and payroll for one week in mid-November. 

Determining Size Cutoff of Small Employer Firms 

Considerable planning effort was devoted to determining the 
size cutoff for "small employer" firms for which census in- 
formation would be obtained from administrative records. A 
study of the composition of business census respondents 
indicated that a uniform size cutoff of five (meaning that only 
firms with more than five paid employees would have to 
complete census questionnaires) would reduce by about one 
million the number of retail and service firms that would have 
to be canvassed. The ultimate decision was that small employers 
relieved of reporting obligations in the business census would 
consist basically of all those single-unit firms with payrolls 
below a specified cutoff that varied by kind of business and was 
designed, in most cases, to limit the groups of establishments 
not required to complete census questionnaires to those that 
would account for approximately 20 percent of total sales in 
each kind of business. The "number-of-employee" equivalent of 
the payroll cutoff generally was in the range of one to three 
employees. A 10-percent sample of these firms was to be 
included in the mail canvass, but data on receipts, payroll, and 
employment for the other 90 percent of the "under cutoff" 
small employer firms were to be obtained from IRS and SSA 
administrative records. 

The size cutoff for manufacturing firms in the 1967 Census 
of Manufactures was 10 employees. This meant that ap- 
proximately 120,000 manufacturing firms with fewer than 10 
paid employees, accounting for less than 3 percent of the pay- 
rolls and value added for manufacturing as a whole, would be 
excused from filing census reports. Approximately 10,000 
mines operating only one establishment (single-unit establish- 
ments) to be included in the 1967 Census of Mineral Industries, 
and accounting for less than 1 percent of the value added for 
mining as a whole, were also relieved of reporting respon- 
sibilities. They were mines with fewer than five paid employees. 
Limited data on payrolls and sales for these manufacturing firms 
and mines were to be compiled from IRS and SSA administra- 
tive records. Estimates of data other than payroll and sales were 
to be constructed from reports of larger companies that did 
complete census questionnaires. 

Planning the Use of Administrative Records 
in Developing the Mailing List 

IRS maintains a comprehensive list of names and addresses of 
legal entities that are required to pay payroll taxes; this list is 
used to mail tax forms, including the employer's quarterly 
Federal tax forms. IRS has assigned an El number to each of 
these legal entities. Plans were made for the Census Bureau to 
obtain this list, from which it would select companies to be 
included in the 1967 Economic Censuses. However, the list 
contained many companies not within the scope of the 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



13 



censuses, and the Census Bureau also needed to know what type 
of economic activity was carried on by each firm. This informa- 
tion was available from two sources: (1) In files from previous 
economic censuses, and (2) on a list of El numbers maintained 
by SSA, to which SSA had assigned business or industry codes 
(Standard Industrial Classification codes) on the basis of in- 
formation reported by each company when it applied for its El 
number. Only those El numbers with business or industry codes 
adjudged within the scope of the censuses were used to develop 
the basic mailing list for the 1967 Economic Censuses. The 
merged IRS and SSA files provided information on name, 
address, number of employees, and type of economic activity 
needed to mail the proper census questionnaire to single-unit 
firms. For the multiunit firms, the Census Bureau planned a 
precanvass to secure an up-to-date iist of establishments. (See 
"Developing the Mailing List for Multiunit Companies: The 
Precanvass," chapter 3, p. 17.) 

Agreements With IRS and SSA 

The first official meeting between the Census Bureau and IRS 
staffs was held on June 10, 1965. The Census Bureau had to 
develop detailed sets of requirements and specifications and get 
them to IRS by November 1965 because IRS planned to 
"freeze" all processing plans for the 1966 income tax year at 
that time. 

In general, Census Bureau officials conferred with their 
counterparts at IRS and SSA to clarify Census Bureau specifica- 
tions and determine how the two administrative agencies could 
best provide the required data. In addition, the Bureau devised 
basic guidelines and criteria for recommending to IRS and SSA 
methods for revising or expanding existing tax forms and data 
tapes, and for merging and standardizing existing fragmentary 
reporting requirements. 

For the 1967 Census of Business, the Census Bureau sub- 
mitted a plan whereby IRS would supplement its planned 
business classification system for 1967 tax returns with a few 
dozen additional 4-digit codes for those selected kinds of 
business in which a significant proportion of receipts are typical- 
ly reported by nonemployers. With this slight modification, it 
was possible to obtain all of the nonemployer data for the 
census directly from the IRS 1967 business universe computer 
tapes. The 100-percent coverage for 1967 would significantly 
improve the accuracy of geographic detail in business census 
publications over the 50-percent coverage in the 1963 censuses. 
The improvement was expected to be especially marked for 
smaller counties and places where these cases had a relatively 
large impact on statistics for total business receipts and on 
counts of establishments. 

It was agreed that IRS would provide to the Census Bureau 
data on tape derived from IRS forms 941 (Employer's Quarterly 
Tax Return), 1040C (Sole Proprietorship Tax Return), and 
1120 (Corporation Tax Return). In addition, the Bureau could 
obtain copies of the IRS forms 1065 (Partnership Tax Return) 
and 1120S (Small Corporation Tax Return). Additional in- 
formation items to be added to these tax forms included 
questions on whether the firm had filed a form 941 for any 
quarter during the year, number of months it was in business 
during the year, and whether it was in business at the end of the 
year. There was also to be a question on precise physical loca- 
tion of the firm included on all tax returns except form 1 120 
(although this was ultimately done only on forms 1040C). IRS 
also agreed to punch and tape the item on total annual payroll 



which appeared on the IRS form W-3 (Salary and Withholding 
Statement) completed for each company; however, IRS dis- 
continued use of this form before 1967, so it was unavailable 
for use in the 1 967 censuses. 

The Census Bureau also requested that IRS extract all other 
information that had already been taped by IRS for its own use 
and that might be useful in processing the 1967 censuses. 

For purposes of establishing a mailing list for the 1967 
censuses, the Census Bureau requested that IRS make available 
the following records: 

1. The Business Master File; specifically, the address file used 
by IRS in mailing third quarter 1967 form 941 , including 
the company names and addresses (street, city, State, ZIP 
code) 

2. From the form 941, all four quarters of 1967 payroll data 
for both total compensation (item 1 of the form 941) and 
FICA taxable wages (item 4 of the form 941) 

3. The Business Master File "correction file" showing 
"births," 2 "deaths," and reactivations, including names, 
addresses, and reasons for action 

After the Census Bureau and IRS had agreed on specific data 
to be supplied, additional discussions were held to determine 
the proper format for providing this information. Data on forms 
941, 1120, and 1040 (schedule C) could be secured from IRS 
on computer tapes and required only a moderate expansion to 
satisfy census requirements. Forms 1065 and 1120S, however, 
had to be microfilmed. (See "Collecting Data From Admin- 
istrative Records," chapter 6, p. 37.) 

Final plans for using administrative records to obtain census 
information indicated that approximately one million small 
employer establishments canvassed by mail in previous 
economic censuses would be excused from completing question- 
naires in the 1967 Economic Censuses. In total, administrative 
records would be used for almost three million firms. 

PLANNING THE CLASSIFICATION OF 
INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY AND PRODUCTS 

The Census Bureau defines the scope of its economic censuses 
and tabulates the results of these censuses on the basis of the 
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. The SIC is used 
in classifying establishments by the type of activity in which 
they engage. It is used in presenting most of the basic 
industrial data gathered by governmental and private organiza- 
tions in the United States. The SIC divides the Nation's 
economic activities into nine broad industrial divisions 
(identified by the first digit of the codes), subdivides each 
division into 2-digit major groups, breaks the major groups into 
3-digit industry subgroups, and further divides the latter into 
4-digit detailed industries. The system provides flexibility by 
permitting use of classifications at various levels of detail (4 
digit, 3 digit, 2 digit, and 1 digit) according to the specific uses 
desired. 

A major phase in preparing for the 1967 Economic Censuses 
was revising the list of SIC industries for which data were 



In general, "births" are companies which have requested El numbers 
during the period covered by the censuses. This usually occurs when a 
new business activity is begun, but births also result from the sale of a 
plant, from changes in the legal form of organization, from a change in 
partners even though there has been no formal sale or purchase of the 
plant, or, more rarely, from a change in the physical location of a plant 
or main office from one IRS district to another. 



14 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



collected in the 1963 censuses, to reflect important changes in 
the economy and the industrial structure as described in the 
1963 censuses statistics. The Census Bureau attempts to 
preserve historical comparability with coding systems used in 
earlier censuses. However, the Budget Bureau published a 
revised SIC Manual in 1967 in which some codes were changed 
on the basis of 1963 census data. In addition, the Census Bureau 
revised some of the 5-digit and 7-digit codes it developed for the 
census of manufactures (based on the 4-digit SIC codes), 
primarily to reflect changes in technology. 

The Bureau developed detailed coding manuals containing all 
possible industry and product classification codes, including 
notations about changes made since 1963. Final plans called for 
the following SIC major groups to be included in the 1967 
Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 

Census SIC major groups 

Business 

Retail Trade 52 to 59 

Wholesale Trade 50 

Public Warehousing Part of 42 

Selected Services 72, 73, 75, 76, 78, and 79; 

Parts of 41 , 42, 47, 70, 80, 81 , and 89 

Manufactures 19 to 39 

Mineral Industries 10 to 14 



CONSULTATIONS, CLEARANCES, AND 
PLANNING FOR INDIVIDUAL CENSUSES 

Census of Business 

The Census Bureau consulted with various retail, wholesale, and 
service trade associations and met with representatives of 64 of 
these associations in planning the 1967 Census of Business. The 
Bureau also cooperated and coordinated extensively with 
professional organizations interested in expanding the scope of 
the census. 

This expansion involved collecting data on engineering and 
architectural firms (as recommended by the American Institute 
of Architects, American Institute of Consulting Engineers, and 
National Society of Professional Engineers), law firms (as 
recommended by the American Bar Association and Federal Bar 
Association), and travel agencies (as recommended by the 
American Society of Travel Agents). Representatives of these 
organizations actively participated with the Census Bureau in 
designing questionnaires to be used to canvass firms in their 
respective disciplines. Separate reports were planned on these 
services. 

A survey of bus and truck carriers not subject to the 
economic regulations of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
conducted as part of the 1963 Census of Transportation, was 
transferred to the 1967 Census of Business because of the basic 
similarity of these carriers to other service industries covered in 
the business census. Plans for this transfer and for the survey 
itself were discussed with representatives of the National As- 
sociation of Motor Bus Owners, American Trucking Association, 
Interstate Commerce Commission, U.S. Department of Trans- 
portation, and other interested organizations. 

An important part of planning the business census was 
delineating central business districts (CBD's) and major retail 
centers (MRC's) for which data were to be published. CBD's 
(usually downtown retail trade areas) were innovations of the 
1954 Census of Business; at that time, 95 CBD's were covered. 
Fourteen more were included in the 1958 census, and, in ad- 



dition, coverage was added for 472 MRC's (concentrations of 
retail stores iocated inside a standard metropolitan statistical 
area but outside of the CBD). The 1963 census covered 131 
CBD's located in 116 SMSA's, and 972 MRC's. The 1967 
censuses collected data for about 1,700 MRC's located in 230 
SMSA's and for 134 CBD's. 

The CBD was defined by the Census Bureau as "an area of 
very high land valuation; an area characterized by a high con- 
centration of retail businesses, offices, theaters, hotels, and 
service businesses; and an area of high traffic flow." The Bureau 
ordinarily required that a CBD consist of one or more whole 
census tracts (small, permanently established areas into which 
large cities and their environs have been divided for statistical 
purposes). 

MRC's were defined as concentrations of retail stores having 
at least $5 million in retail sales and at least 10 retail establish- 
ments, one of which had to be a department store. MRC's might 
be either planned suburban shopping centers or "string" street 
and neighborhood developments. 

Beginning with the 1963 Census of Business, collection of 
data on retaii establishment sales, showing major lines of 
merchandise sold by kind of business, was reinstituted. This 
type of inquiry had been omitted from the 1954 and 1958 
censuses because data collected in the 1948 census were deemed 
inadequate. Publication of information on merchandise line 
sales reflects a continuing demand by manufacturers, whole- 
salers and other marketing groups, newspapers and various 
advertising media, and government agencies for data on the 
extent of the sale of different lines of merchandise in different 
kinds of retail businesses. 

In planning this aspect of the census, the Bureau again 
consulted extensively with trade associations and business firms 
for advice on what merchandise line inquiries they rec- 
ommended and on what difficulty they might have in 
providing answers to these inquiries. The amount of detail 
requested in the census was dictated by both of these considera- 
tions. 

For the 1967 census, as for the 1963 census, several methods 
of collecting merchandise line information were investigated and 
tested. The test results indicated that a distribution of retail 
sales into about 25 major lines was about as much as could be 
generally requested, with additional detail for some of the lines 
handled in significant quantities in selected kinds of business. 

All 1967 Census of Business questionnaires for retail 
establishments included inquiries on sales by major merchandise 
lines. However not all employers were canvassed for 1967. All 
multiunit establishments and all large single units were 
canvassed for merchandise line data, but only a 10-percent 
sample of the approximately 500,000 small single units were 
mailed census questionnaires. Data from this sample were then 
"inflated" for the establishments they represented. Although 
large in number, the firms not canvassed represented only about 
15 percent of total sales of establishments with payrolls in most 
kinds of business. Selected business categories, such as depart- 
ment stores, were completely canvassed. 

A significant addition to the questionnaires to be completed 
by retail establishments was an inquiry on floor space. For the 
section on in-store selling space, the respondent was to enter 
square footage of in-store selling space at the end of 1967, 
including all areas of the store open to customers (such as aisles, 
elevators, and demonstration areas). Display windows fronting 
on streets or sidewalks, outside entrance ways, and other out- 
door space were to be excluded. Another section of this 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



15 



question asked for square feet of total space. The respondent 
was to include selling space, building service areas, dry storage 
and refrigerated areas, offices, workrooms, display windows, 
and all other areas, excluding only outdoor space such as 
parking lots. 

Census of Manufactures 

The Census Bureau solicited and carefully reviewed recom- 
mendations for new industrial data to be collected in the 1967 
Census of Manufactures. The Bureau's policy was to consult 
with as many manufacturers, trade associations, and other 
interested organizations as possible before making a decision on 
what inquiries would be included in the census. When this 
decision had been made, meetings were held with about 150 
manufacturers to explain the concepts and instructions as- 
sociated with the census. 

The Bureau prepared a tentative list of primary industries to 
be covered by the various census of manufactures question- 
naires, and questionnaire specifications were drafted and were 
reviewed by commodity analysts. 

Data on products and services of the various manufacturing 
industries were to be collected on 180 separate questionnaires. 
Each questionnaire was to cover one or more industries and 
contained an item listing the primary and chief secondary 
products frequently reported in past censuses by establishments 
in these industries. (For example, malt beverages and brewing 
byproducts are primary products of the malt and malt beverage 
industry.) 

Major industry groups, industry groups, and industries were 
classified for census purposes to make them identical in both 
title and content with the Standard Industrial Classification 
Manual (1967 edition). However, this manual codes products to 
only four digits. (See "Planning the Classification of Industrial 
Activity and Products," chapter 2, p. 13.) For the census of 
manufactures, the Census Bureau extended the SIC classifica- 
tion to 5-digit product classes and 7-digit products for specific 
identification of the product coded. The classification system 
and codes were reviewed and approved by the SIC Technical 
Committee on Industrial Classification, a group sponsored by 
the Bureau of the Budget consisting of representatives of 
Federal statistical agencies. 

Proposed questionnaires were prepared and reviewed by 
industry representatives and Government agencies and approved 
by the Bureau of the Budget during the period March 1966 to 
March 1967. The questionnaires were ready for preparation of 
final copy for reproduction by July 1967. 

Plans called for information on about 5,500 products to be 
collected in the 1967 Census of Manufactures (in addition to 
5,000 products for which tieline summary information was to 
be obtained from the current survey programs). A new inquiry 
on "fuels consumed" was to be included as part of the question 
on materials consumed in the manufacturing process. In ad- 
dition, a special question on buildings and other structures 
erected by employees of manufacturing establishments (termed 
force account work) was added to provide for data needs 
resulting from the expansion of the economic censuses to 
include contract construction industries. 

At the request of the Office of Business Economics of the 
U.S. Department of Commerce, a special survey on distribution 
of sales of manufactured products was planned. (This survey 
was conducted in the 1958 Economic Censuses but was dropped 
in 1963.) Information on this subject was needed by the Office 
of Business Economics for preparation of input-output tables, 



which depict the way the industries of the Nation interact. Each 
company canvassed would be asked to submit a breakdown of 
its sales to major classes of customers (such as other manufac- 
turers, wholesalers, retailers, and the Federal Government). 
These customer classes were tied into the ones used in the 1967 
Census of Business. 

Closely related to this survey was a supplementary survey on 
materials consumed in manufacturing. Plans called for large 
manufacturers in the chemical and metal fabricating industries 
to furnish a breakdown of "all other materials consumed" that 
they had reported on their census questionnaires. The list of 
materials was somewhat larger than the 1963 list, but most of 
the changes involved publication of additional information 
rather than major revisions in the inquiries. 

A third special survey was planned on industrial water usage. 
Establishments reporting consumption of more than 20 million 
gallons of water on their 1967 census questionnaires were to be 
asked for details on their water intake, use, treatment, and dis- 
charge during 1968. 

Census of Mineral Industries 

The Bureau of the Census worked in close cooperation with the 
Bureau of Mines in planning and conducting the 1967 Census of 
Mineral Industries. A major problem was the reconciliation of 
Census Bureau tabulations with the extensive information on 
mineral industries collected and published by the Bureau of 
Mines and by the States. In late 1966, plans were discussed with 
the Bureau of Mines to minimize the reporting responsibilities 
for respondents who report to that agency and to assure that 
results would be as comparable and unduplicated as possible. 

In the 1967 census, the 40,000 mining establishments were 
separated into two groups. Establishments 3 with five or more 
paid employees were to be asked to complete census question- 
naires. A 5-percent sample of establishments with less than five 
employees (and larger samples for selected geographic areas and 
for industry group 131, crude petroleum and natural gas, and 
industry group 138, gas field services) would also receive census 
questionnaires. Establishments with less than five employees 
who were not included in the sample would not have to 
complete questionnaires. Information would be secured from 
IRS and SSA administrative records on payrolls, sales, and 
industry classification of these firms, and other information 
would be imputed from the sample and from industry averages. 

Item 16 on the census of mineral industries questionnaires, a 
water use inquiry, was simplified in the 1967 census and 
required only information on quantity of water intake. The 



3 Although an establishment was defined much the same for mineral 
censuses as for other censuses, for mineral forms MC-13A, "Oil and Gas 
Field Operations," and MC-10K, "Mineral Contract Services," an estab- 
lishment was defined as all operations of a company in an entire State 
(except offshore operations); for Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and 
California, as all operations in a district within a State; or as all offshore 
operations adjacent to a State. In addition to the districts within the 
States of Texas, Louisiana, and New Mexico for which data were 
provided for the first time in 1963, a four-way district break was 
provided for California which is as nearly as possible consistent with 
industry usage but follows the census requirement that boundaries be 
along county lines. Since the precanvass was not entirely satisfactory in 
amending the mailing list to account for the change in definition, ad- 
ditional blank forms, and flyers describing the purpose of the blank 
forms, were prepared to be included in the mailing packages for 
companies which had establishments in mineral contract services and oil 
and gas field operations. 



16 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



1963 questionnaire also contained a question on principal 
sources of water. However, the Census Bureau planned a sup- 
plemental water survey similar to that conducted for the manu- 
facturing industries. It also resembled the inquiry on water 
included on the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries question- 
naires. This replaced surveys which were conducted by the 
Bureau of Mines for 1959 and 1962 but which that agency 
asked the Census Bureau to conduct for 1967. 

The 1967 questionnaires for the oil and gas extraction area 
(forms MC-13A and MC-13B) was extensively revised as a result 
of discussions over a 5-year period by industry and Government 
on the need for oil and gas extraction statistics. In a report to 
the President in September 1962, the Petroleum Study Com- 
mittee recommended that ". . .the Bureau of the Budget in 
cooperation with the agencies responsible for the needed in- 
formation. . .develop a proposal for a coordinated program to 
provide the needed data." As a result, the Bureau of the Budget 
established a Petroleum Statistics Study Group with members 
from the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Interior, Justice, 
State, Treasury, the Council of Economic Advisers, the Office 



of Emergency Planning, 4 the Federal Power Commission, and 
the Bureau of the Budget itself. In 1966 other Government 
committees were established to study improvement of 
petroleum statistics, and parallel committees were established 
by industry to study industry's requirements for oil and gas 
extraction statistics. New information was requested on report 
forms MC-13A and MC-13B as a result of proposals from the 
various committees. 

Finally, a new form NC-K13 (on company exploration 
expenditures and assets for oil and gas field operations) was 
developed in answer to industry's objections to the attempt to 
collect information on exploration expenditures and gross assets 
on an operator basis. The Census Bureau decided that a separate 
questionnaire would be used to collect company figures on a net 
working interest basis for geographic divisions and selected 
States. This questionnaire was to be sent to a sample of the 
companies included in the 1967 census. 



4 The Office of Emergency Planning was redesignated as the Office 
of Emergency Preparedness by act of October 21 , 1968, with no change 
in functions. 



CHAPTER 



3 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 
DEVELOPING THE MAILING LIST 



DEVELOPING THE MAILING LIST FOR MULTIUNIT 
COMPANIES: THE PRECANVASS 

During the period March 1967 to February 1968, the Census 
Bureau conducted a precanvass of the large multiunit firms to 
be covered in the 1967 Economic Censuses. The primary ob- 
jective of the precanvass was to update the 1963 census 
directory file of company and establishment address records 
with the latest available information on ownership and 
economic activity. To the extent that this objective was 
achieved, the requirement to mail the appropriate census 
questionnaire to each in-scope establishment operated by these 
firms could be met more economically and efficiently during 
the actual 1967 censuses operation. The precanvass would 
enable the Bureau to determine company affiliation of each 
establishment so that confidentiality rules would not be violated 
by disclosing data reported by individual companies. It would 
also be useful in satisfying publication requirements, controlling 
mailout during the censuses, and meeting statistical needs. 



Precanvass Questionnaires 

Two types of questionnaires, designed by the Census Common 
Questions Coordinating Committee, were used in the pre- 
canvass. The longer questionnaire, form NC-X1A, was generally 
sent to firms already known to be multiunits. Included in this 
category were (1) firms that reported five establishments or 
more in the 1963 censuses, (2) all multiunit firms that reported 
payrolls of $200,000 or more in the 1963 censuses, even if they 
had only two, three, or four establishments, (3) all multiunit 
firms included in the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM), 
(4) multiunit firms with at least one known establishment 
engaged in construction activities (known from records of 
previous censuses and surveys, from social security records, or 
from other sources such as industrial directories), (5) multiunit 
firms with establishments classified in two economic censuses or 
more (such as a manufacturing firm with retail outlets), and (6) 
miscellaneous organizations containing more than one establish- 
ment, such as government-owned liquor stores or utility 
company retail stores. 

Form NC-X1B, a shorter questionnaire, was generally sent to 
firms regarded as potential multiunits. Companies were selected 
for the NC-X1B mailing list primarily on the basis of 1966 



County Business Patterns 1 information. Receiving forms 
NC-X1B were mineral industries companies that reported 250 
employees or more, manufacturing companies reporting 500 
employees or more, and business concerns indicating employ- 
ment of 50 workers or more. 

On the basis of information in its records, the Census Bureau 
preprinted on form NC-X1A the name and address of each 
company to be canvassed, its employer identification (El) 
numbers, and the names, addresses, Ei numbers, census file 
numbers, and size and industry codes of its domestic establish- 
ments. The company was asked to (1) correct any errors in the 
preprinted information, (2) list main office names and addresses 
corresponding to preprinted El numbers, (3) list any additional 
El numbers and corresponding main office names and addresses, 
and (4) give names, addresses of physical location, and El 
numbers of any other establishments, check boxes to indicate 
the establishment's major activity and approximate number of 
employees, and list its principal products, lines of merchandise, 
types of services, or construction activity. 

On form NC-X1B, the Census Bureau preprinted the 
company's name, address, and El number, which were to be 
corrected as necessary by the respondent. Each company was 
asked if it operated more than one establishment. If so, the firm 
was to indicate the number of establishments it operated and to 
provide the name, physical location address, kind of business 
activity, and approximate number of employees for each. 

Both questionnaires contained inquiries on whether the 
respondents owned or controlled other companies or were 
themselves owned or controlled by another firm. 

Special Handling of Complex Companies 

Approximately 700 large multiunit companies were segregated 
for special handling in the precanvass because it was anticipated 
that problems involving overlap and duplication would have to 
be resolved in these cases. For example, many of these 
"complex" companies had activities which would be covered in 
both the census of business and the census of manufactures. 



'The County Business Patterns are a series of reports, published 
annually, presenting first quarter employment and Federal Insurance 
Contributions Act taxable payroll data for each county, standard 
metropolitan statistical area, and State, based principally on records of 
the Social Security Administration. 



17 



18 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Preparing the Precanvass Mailing List 

The Census Bureau used the following source files of company- 
establishment information to prepare the mailing list for the 
1967 precanvass: 



Company /establ ish ment 
category 



Source files 



Companies not included in the 
ASM 



Manufacturing establishments, 
auxiliaries, and central administra- 
tive offices of ASM companies 

Other establishments of ASM com- 
panies 

Large firms appearing in 1966 in 
the Social Security Administration 
(SSA) "Large Employer Report" 
(LER)file 



Selected construction firms 



Corrected 1963 precanvass infor- 
mation and 1963 censuses direc- 
tory, updated by the Bureau's 
various monthly and annual sur- 
veys 

ASM directory files, updated to 
reflect organizational changes re- 
ported in the 1966 ASM 

1 963 censuses directory 

SSA source files if a cross-check of 
El number against census directory 
files indicated that the firm was 
not already included in the 1963 
censuses or 1966 ASM files as a 
multiunit company 

SSA "List of Establishments of 
Reporting Units" firms (firms 
selected were identified as poten- 
tial multiunits by census analysts) 



The business census professional staff added to the pre- 
canvass mailing list the large retailers and wholesalers identified 
after December 31, 1963, in the current business surveys, 
indicated retail firms that merged or sold out after that date, 
and made other miscellaneous additions and corrections. Since 
coverage of the construction industry was reinstituted in the 
1967 Economic Censuses, the Census Bureau included these 
companies in the precanvass; using administrative records main- 
tained by the SSA and the Census Bureau's own records (pri- 
marily the County Business Patterns reports), it prepared a list 
of potential multiunit construction firms for inclusion in the 
precanvass. (See Chapter 11, "Census of Construction Indus- 
tries.") 

Preparing Questionnaires and Mailing Packages 

Precanvass questionnaires, control and reference listings, and 
mailing labels were prepared with extensive use of computers. 
Questionnaires were preprinted by high-speed printers on 
continuous form paper and had to be separated, collated, and 
assembled into mailing packages, which also contained the cover 
letters, instruction sheets, and return envelopes. The question- 
naires were prepared in triplicate. Two copies were for the 
respondent, who was instructed to return the original and to 
retain the carbon copy in his files. The third copy was the 
Census Bureau's copy, which was sometimes used to provide 
duplicates to respondents whose copies were lost. Stringent 
quality control procedures were applied during the assembly of 
mailing packages, and postal ZIP codes were carefully verified. 
A census file number, printed on each questionnaire, facilitated 
assembly of mailing packages and later processing operations. 

Mailing Precanvass Questionnaires 

Beginning in March 1967, precanvass questionnaires were mailed 
to the complex companies, and most of this mailout had been 
completed by the end of that month. During June 1967, 
questionnaires were mailed to all other firms included in the 



precanvass. Additional time was allowed for the complex 
companies because of the complicated problems anticipated 
from these firms. In the 1963 precanvass, questionnaires were 
mailed in January of that year, but the 1967 mailout was 
delayed to allow less time between the precanvass and the 
censuses for changes to occur in company names, addresses, and 
organizational structures. The 1967 mailout was divided as 
follows: 



Type of company 


Form 
NC-X1A 


Form 
NC-X1B 


Total 


Complex companies 


666 
39,057 


NA 
32,844 


666 


Noncomplex companies 


71,901 



Checking In and Processing Precanvass Returns 

The check-in of precanvass returns was initiated at the Census 
Bureau's Jeffersonville Census Operations Division almost im- 
mediately after each mailout. The check-in process, requiring 
punching of "check-in" punchcards, was of critical importance 
in the precanvass because this system controlled receipt of 
questionnaires and related correspondence and was designed to 
assure that only companies which had not responded 
("delinquents") were included in the followup mailings. 

Mail receipts were coded to indicate that the reporting 
requirement was "satisfied" (for example, by completed 
questionnaires, with or without correspondence), that action 
should be "suspended" (as in the case of letters from companies 
requesting clarification or additional information), or that the 
reporting deadline should be extended (as in the case of mailing 
packages with incorrect addresses that had to be readdressed 
and remailed). 

Postmaster returns and postmaster refusals— About 2,600 pre- 
canvass mailing packages were returned by the post office as 
undeliverable, usually because of incorrect or insufficient 
addresses; these were referred to as "postmaster returns" 
(PMR's). The Census Bureau attempted to locate in its files a 
more accurate address for each PMR and to remail the question- 
naire to the new address. If no other address could be located 
(usually because the company had gone out of business), the 
questionnaire was placed in a "PMR Dead File." 

Questionnaires refused by addressees (referred to as "post- 
master refusals") were repackaged with a special form letter 
stressing the legal requirement to report and were remailed by 
certified mail. 

Correspondence— All correspondence from complex companies 
and all separate correspondence (not sent with questionnaires) 
from other single-unit and multiunit firms (referred to as non- 
complex companies) were forwarded to Census Bureau head- 
quarters for resolution of problems and drafting of replies. 
Correspondence enclosed with questionnaires from noncompiex 
companies was forwarded to analysts in Jeffersonville for 
necessary action. 

Completed questionnaires— Questionnaires returned by non- 
complex companies were initially scanned for problems. 
Questionnaires returned unchanged by the noncomplex 
companies were then forwarded for preparation of punchcards 
and computer processing. Returns with changes were sent to a 
clerical editing unit, where changes were examined for 
completeness and consistency (to check for missing names and 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



19 



addresses, missing or impossible El numbers, and other errors or 
omissions). Edited questionnaires were forwarded for coding 
and verification; industry codes, census file numbers, geographic 
codes, and employment size codes were assigned to newly 
identified establishments; and all coding and editing were care- 
fully verified. 

After these clerical editing, coding, and verifying operations 
had been completed, the questionnaires were sent to keypunch 
units for punching of correction cards. The keypunch used in 
this operation was equipped with a check-digit verification 
device; the check-digit was computed from the punched census 
file number and compared to the check-digit already punched 
(see "Check-digit verification," chapter 1, p. 9). If the two 
numbers did not agree, the card was rejected, and the operator 
repunched the card. If the check-digit was rejected three times, 
the questionnaire was returned for verification of census file 
number. 

Information provided by respondents on precanvass 
questionnaires to correct and update preprinted listings of El 
numbers, list new El numbers, and give corresponding names 
and addresses was punched on punchcards to create a cor- 
rection/control file. One card was punched for each El number, 
and punching was verified and reverified. Information from 
these cards was eventually recorded on microfilm. Each week, 
information on check-in cards and correction cards for name 
and address changes was transcribed to magnetic tape and trans- 
mitted to Census Bureau headquarters for computer editing. 
The primary purpose of the computer edit was to check for 
duplication of census file numbers and impossible codes. Census 
file numbers for each company and its subsidiaries were 
matched against census file numbers of establishments, and dis- 
crepancies were listed and were reviewed and resolved by census 
analysts. The computer also counted the number of establish- 
ments listed for each company and compared this count with 
the total reported by the company. 

ASM companies— Precanvass questionnaires returned by ASM 
companies were handled separately. Corrections indicated by 
these companies were processed against the 1966 ASM mailing 
register which, in turn, was recombined with the corrected pre- 
canvass mailing register before the mailout of census question- 
naires. 

Followup Mailings 

Companies that did not return their precanvass questionnaires 
by the established deadline (normally, 20 days after the 
expected date of receipt) received letters reminding them that 
their reports were overdue. Just before each followup, all ac- 
cumulated check-in records were printed out by the computer 
for reference use by subject-matter divisions. After clerical 
verification of company folders, the "delinquent" files became 
input for the computer, which addressed followup letters to 
firms that had not returned questionnaires. During the pre- 
canvass, four regular followups were conducted as follows: 









Number of delinquents in 


Date of 


Mailing 
location 


Type of 
followup 




mailing 


followup 


Total 


NC-X1A's 


NC-X1B's 


July 25 . . 


Washington 


Letter 


31,826 


1 8,001 


13,825 


Aug. 9 


Jeffersonville . . 


Letter 


17,940 


11,021 


6,919 


Aug. 22 . . 


Jeffersonville . . 


Certified 












letter 


9,078 


4,982 


4,096 


Sept. 12 . . 


Jeffersonville . . 


Letter 


3,586 


1,096 


2,490 



The first two followup letters reminded delinquent 
companies that their returns were overdue and that the report 
was required by law. The third followup, a certified letter, 
constituted the prescribed official notification that the 
company was subject to legal action for failure to report, and 
the fourth followup letter warned that the case would have to 
be referred for "appropriate legal action" if the company did 
not respond within one week. 

Followup letters were not used for delinquent complex 
firms. Instead, the subject-matter specialist responsible for the 
company attempted to obtain precanvass information by tele- 
phone or personal visit. After the fourth mail followup, other 
special telephone followups were conducted for some firms, 
including large companies that needed additional time or ad- 
ditional assistance and companies that had completed and 
returned their questionnaires but were asked for additional or 
clarifying information. 

Mail receipts were sampled to assure that companies which 
had responded would not be included in the followups. Samples 
were selected at the following rates: 



Small packages 

(single-unit firms) 

with or without 

correspondence 

1/500 



Large packages 

(multiunits) 
with or without 
correspondence 

1/100 



Separate 
correspondence 



Congressional 
1/1 



Other 
1/50 



The sample was selected daily as the questionnaires were 
received, the necessary information was recorded on cards, and 
the questionnaires were returned to their position in the batch. 
The cards, in census file number sequence, were then forwarded 
on a flow basis to a quality control unit. Just before each 
followup, census file numbers in the sample were matched 
against the listing of delinquent returns. If one of the sample 
census file numbers appeared on the unsatisfied listing, the 
followup mailing was postponed until analysts provided a 
proper solution. 

As of October 6, 1967, after the fourth followup, a total of 
69,992 questionnaires had been checked in as either processable 
or as postmaster returns. This included 36,296 NC-X1A forms, 
31,093 NC-X1B forms, and 2,603 questionnaires returned by 
the post office as undeliverable (usually indicating that the firm 
was no longer in operation). In addition, a total of 651 NC-X1 A 
questionnaires were returned by the complex companies. 

Late Receipts 

Check-in operations were discontinued on September 30, 1967, 
and questionnaires received after that time were processed as 
late receipts. About 500 questionnaires received after dis- 
continuation of check-in were edited and processed before the 
mailout for the censuses. 

Special Precanvass of Selected Large Out-of-Scope Companies 

A basic assumption in planning the 1967 censuses was that the 
SSA could define the "in-census-scope" universe of employers 
listed in the active Internal Revenue Service quarterly tax return 
file. It was assumed that SSA could make this determination on 
the basis of information provided by the employers when they 
applied for their El numbers. Firms classified as in-scope on the 
basis of SSA information could be reclassified as out-of-scope 
during the census operations if necessary, but there was no 
operationally feasible way to identify firms classified as out- 
of-scope by SSA that did have some in-scope activities. On the 
basis of its experience in the 1963 censuses, the Census Bureau 



20 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



suspected that there were many large firms classified as out- 
of-scope in SSA files that did engage in in-scope activities and 
that their omission resulted in significant undercoverage of some 
industries. 

To minimize suspected undercoverage, a special survey of 
approximately 9,000 out-of-scope employers with 50 employees 
or more was conducted as an adjunct to the 1967 precanvass. 
Out-of-scope industries were selected for the survey if it ap- 
peared likely that the SSA might have misclassified them (for 
example, when a misclassification might have resulted from a 
slight variation in terminology used to describe a firm's primary 
activities) or if there was evidence that a primarily out-of-scope 
firm might have in-scope activities. 

Using the latest industry-coded employer records file from 
SSA (the 1966 County Business Patterns file), the Census 
Bureau conducted this special survey after completion of the 
regular precanvass mailouts. A survey form letter containing a 
series of check-boxes describing various in-scope activities was 
sent to each firm. Companies whose replies indicated that they 
had some in-scope activities were contacted by telephone or 
letter to obtain the detailed information necessary for these 
firms to be included in the mailout of 1967 census question- 
naires. (Fewer than 400 establishments were added to the mail- 
out as a result of this special survey.) 

Converting the Precanvass Register to the Census Register 

The Census Bureau's multiunit address file had to be corrected 
to indicate the additions, deletions, corrections, and other 
changes arising during the precanvass, primarily as reflected on 
the NC-X1A and NC-X1B precanvass questionnaires. Two 
special forms, "Record of Change in Company Affiliation" and 
a check-in correction form, were used to isolate information 
required to punch correction cards, and detailed clerical proce- 
dures were developed to control transcription, verification, and 
disposition of corrected forms. Information on the punchcards 
was transcribed to magnetic tape, and the tape was processed 
against the precanvass mailing register to update this register and 
convert it to the mailing register for the censuses. 

DEVELOPING THE INITIAL CONTROL FILE 

In developing the initial control file for the 1967 Economic 
Censuses, the Census Bureau used essentially the same sources it 
used to obtain the mailing list for the precanvass of multiunits, 
i.e., its own files, and also administrative records of the Internal 
Revenue Service (IRS) and SSA. The Bureau's 1963 Economic 
Censuses historical files, special establishment lists, and ASM 
name and address and data files contained establishment names, 
addresses, El numbers, Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 
codes, geographic codes, and employment, payroll, and sales 
information. 

The Business Master File (BMF), maintained by IRS, 
provides a complete file of names, addresses, and certain other 
characteristics of all taxpayers who are required to withhold 
income taxes from their employees' wages. For the 1967 
Economic Censuses, the Census Bureau obtained a copy of this 
file. The basic file was established in August 1967 and was 
updated each month by information obtained from IRS on 
"births" (new businesses), "deaths" (businesses discontinued, 
transferred to successor, continued but without employees, or 
changed in organization), reactivations, changes in name and 
address, and other changes. 



The IRS "daily transaction" file provided quarterly employ- 
ment and payroll items from the 941 forms (quarterly tax 
returns) and business receipt items from the 1120 forms 
(corporate tax returns), along with the taxpayers' El numbers. 
This information was made available to the Census Bureau on 
computer tapes that could be easily converted for census use. 

The SSA provided information on type of activity engaged in 
by each firm obligated to pay payroll taxes, based on its 
quarterly payroll tax files and a "classification" file containing 
information reported by companies when they applied to SSA 
for their El numbers. (See "Planning the Use of Data From 
Administrative Records," chapter 2, p. 12.) 

In November 1967, the IRS Business Master File, the IRS 
daily transaction tape, the SSA file, and the 1963 Economic 
Censuses historical file were merged to create the initial 1967 
Economic Censuses control file. The multiunit companies on 
the list were then identified, and information on the list was 
replaced by the information obtained in the precanvass of multi- 
unit companies. This file comprised the potential universe of 
companies to be included in the censuses, and, with duplicate 
records removed, was the basis for the development of the 
census mailing list. 



DEVELOPING THE MAILING LIST FOR SINGLE-UNIT 
COMPANIES 

The final mailing list for single-unit companies was developed in 
a large-scale two-phase match/merge operation, utilizing the 
initial control file. The first phase removed out-of-scope estab- 
lishments, and the second phase removed addresses with El 
numbers already included in the multiunit mailing list. 

Phase one matched El numbers from the historical 1963 
census file (about 2.5 million records), the IRS mailing address 
file (about 3.7 million records), and the SSA file (about 6.3 
million records). In this matching operation, selected informa- 
tion about companies in the initial control file (SIC code, 
geographic area code, and a measure of the companies' size) also 
was matched to the 1963 census file. In addition, companies 
coded by the SSA as out of scope were removed. 

In phase two, computer tapes of the IRS payroll file, the 
precanvass multiunit file (El numbers), and the potential single- 
unit register were matched. During this matching/merging 
operation, the tape files were divided to produce the following 
listings: 

1. The single-unit control file, including both mail and non- 
mail cases with in-scope SIC codes 

2. The out-of-scope file 

3. Master control file of multiunit El numbers 

The various steps of matching and merging culminated in the 
selection of a portion of the revised and updated BMF as the 
1967 Economic Censuses single-unit control file. This basic 
register contained the following information: 

1. Company names and addresses 

2. Historic-size and SIC codes 

3. Geographic codes 

4. Current payroll items and SIC codes 

Unmatched records were classified and canvassed for additional 
information, and new establishments from the I RS birth file and 
SSA active file reporting El numbers were later added to the 
register. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



21 



DELINEATING THE MAIL AND NONMAIL SINGLE-UNIT 
ESTABLISHMENTS 

Single-unit firms to be included in the 1967 censuses had to be 
identified as either "large" establishments (which would receive 
census questionnaires) or "small" establishments (for which 
census information would be obtained from administrative 
records). After a detailed analysis of the relative contribution of 
smaller establishments to the quality and quantity of statistics 
collected in the 1963 censuses and other evaluations, "size 
cutoffs" were established to differentiate between large and 
small establishments. (See "Planning the Use of Data From 
Administrative Records," chapter 2, p. 12.) 

To make the distinction between large and small establish- 
ments on the computer (after the size cutoffs had been deter- 
mined), the IRS 941 quarterly payroll file was merged, on the 
basis of El numbers, with (1) the 1967 multiunit precanvass file, 
(2) the 1963 censuses historical file, (3) the 1966 ASM file, and 
(4) the SSA file. 



Records were then divided into the following groups: 

1. Multiunit establishments, ASM establishments, and out- 
of-scope establishments 

2. "Large" establishments to be canvassed by mail 

3. "Small" single-unit establishments for which administra- 
tive records would be used to compile census data 

In general, then, the 1967 Economic Censuses had four 
components: Multiunit companies, small single-unit employer 
establishments, large single-unit employer establishments, and 
nonemployers. The first three components were controlled and 
managed separately throughout all processing stages until they 
were combined with each other via computer. Nonemployers 
were not identified at this stage of processing since they do not 
appear in the BMF (which includes only firms with employees). 
Data for nonemployers were developed from income tax returns 
during later stages of the censuses. 



CHAPTER 



4 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 

GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODING 



BACKGROUND 

The Census Bureau requires accurate information on the 
physical location of each establishment covered in its economic 
censuses in order to prepare tabulations of economic activity in 
political entities such as States, counties, cities, or towns, and in 
special statistical areas such as standard metropolitan statistical 
areas (SMSA's), central business districts (CBD's), and major 
retail centers (MRC's). (See appendix E for definitions and 
descriptions of geographic areas covered.) Geographic codes are 
assigned for the physical locations of the establishments so that 
data can be summarized and published for these various types of 
areas. 

Until the 1963 Economic Censuses, geographic codes were 
assigned by Census Bureau clerks to the address of the physical 
location of the establishment. Using a coding manual and in- 
formation on physical location supplied by the respondent, 
clerks assigned a numeric code to each establishment after its 
questionnaire had been received and checked. This procedure 
delayed the processing of the returns and was sometimes in- 
accurate. 

For the 1963 censuses, the Bureau developed and operated a 
system that enabled the computer to assign a numeric code 
identifying geographic entities to a mailing address before mail- 
out of the questionnaires. Both a numeric code and a prefix 
symbol were assigned by the computer and printed on the mail- 
ing label of the census questionnaire as part of the mailing 
operation. The prefix symbols were used to indicate that there 
was, or was not, some question that the location indicated by 
the mailing address might be wrong. As in past censuses, all 
questionnaires contained an inquiry to distinguish the physical 
location from the mailing address. If the prefix symbol 
indicated that the code assigned before mailout might be wrong, 
or the physical location differed from the mailing address, the 
questionnaire was to be clerically reviewed and possibly recoded 
when it was returned by the respondent. 

The assignment of geographic codes to mail addresses in the 
1963 censuses required the use of three basic reference files: 

1. The City Reference File (CRF), containing the names of 
all 34,000 places' in the United States, including post 
offices, plus alternate spellings and common misspellings 

2. The Address Reference File (ARF), containing ap- 
proximately 800,000 records consisting of street names 
and house number ranges within census tract, postal zone, 



and street direction. The 1963 ARF covered only the 
areas serviced by post offices located in cities of 25,000 or 
more population. This reference file was developed from a 
file purchased from a commercial marketing research firm 
and was adapted to census requirements by correcting 
boundaries of tracts on the borders of cities and stand- 
ardizing code format to facilitate computer matching. 2 
3. The Building Reference File (BRF), containing names and 
street locations of office buildings, hotels, and motels in 
cities of 25,000 or more population. The BRF was used as 
an adjunct to the ARF in matching and coding because it 
is a common practice for building name to be used in lieu 
of street identification in the mailing address (for 
example, the "Professional Building, Jacksonville, 
Florida" instead of the street address of this building). 

Computer coding for the 1963 censuses was a two-phase 
operation. In the first phase, the computer matched the city and 
State in the establishment address to the CRF to assign a State, 
county, and place code. In the second phase, addresses 
specifically identified in the first phase as being located in areas 
served by post offices in cities of 25,000 or more population 
were processed against the ARF or BRF. A "point system" was 
used in the computer system whereby points were assigned on 
the basis of how closely the establishment mailing address 
matched the reference file. 

1967 GEOGRAPHIC CODING MODIFICATIONS 

The geographic coding system used in the 1967 Economic 
Censuses was based on the 1963 system, with further develop- 
mental work and certain revisions. The major changes in the 
1967 system included the following: 

1. Improving the reference files: Adding 3-digit ZIP codes to 
header records and 5-digit ZIP codes to detailed address 
records; adding to the files, building names and variants in 
spelling and abbreviation, principally identified from 1963 
addresses failing to be coded; expanding coverage of the 
address reference file to include cities having 2,500 to 
25,000 inhabitants as well as those having 25,000 or more 

2. Combining the address records of small and large cities 
into one integrated file 

3. Coding on the basis of two principles: Blocking 
(assembling into units) the file of address reference file 
records on the basis of the 3-digit ZIP code and a Russell 



The term "place," for census purposes, refers to any concentration 
of population regardless of the existence of legally prescribed limits, 
powers, or functions. 



Census tract statistics were not published in the 1967 Economic 
Censuses, but they can be tabulated from information collected in the 
business census. 



22 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



23 



Soundex Code where street name was present, and identi- 
fying the most likely candidate in the reference file for 
assigning a code to the input address 

4. Expanding the number of prefix symbols to be printed 
with numeric geographic codes as well as internal com- 
puter codes 

5. Programing the system for the 1107 UNI VAC computer 
rather than the 1105 UN I VAC used in 1963 

6. Providing for using the computer to change geographic 
codes of establishments when there were differences 
between the physical location and mailing address 

Expanding ARF coverage to cities with 2,500 to 25,000 inhab- 
itants—In essence, the 1967 ARF was formed by merging the 
Large City Address Reference File (LARF), which consisted of 
addresses from the approximately 700 cities with populations of 
25,000 or more that comprised the 1963 ARF, and the Small 
City Address Reference File (SARF), which consisted of addresses 
in about 4,400 cities with populations of 2,500 to 25,000. 

About 600 SARF cities had been included in the 1963 ARF 
because, although their populations were less than 25,000, they 
were adjoining or near cities with 25,000 or more population. 
The reference file for SARF cities was created from a com- 
mercial source listing of street names and house number ranges, 
by post office. For each city (including the original 600), a 
listing of streets was mailed to city officials with a request that 
they examine it for completeness, add missing streets, correct 
misspellings, and identify any street extending beyond city 
limits. For streets extending beyond city limits, city officials 
were asked to furnish the first house number outside the city 
and the name of the place in which this address was located. 

Nearly 80 percent of the cities complied with these requests, 
and about 75 percent also furnished usable maps and annotated 
listings. Information for cities that did not respond was 
obtained from other sources by Census Bureau geographers. 

ZIP Coding— An analysis of the 1963 censuses revealed that 
more than 15 percent of the failures to match addresses of 
establishments to address reference files would have been 
resolved if information about the post office zone in which the 
establishment was located had been available. For the 1967 
censuses, therefore, ZIP codes were added to both the reference 
file records and establishment address records. 

Under the 1967 system, ZIP codes were used to bypass the 
first phase of 1963 computer matching (matching of an estab- 
lishment address against the CRF) and enter directly into the 
second phase of matching and coding operations involving the 
ARF and BRF. As part of the system, if the ZIP code was 
missing from the establishment address, the first phase proce- 
dures could be used to assign the missing ZIP code. 



COMPUTER CODING 



Programing 



As a result of the shift of computer coding operations from the 
1105 UNI VAC computer to the 1107 machine, new computer 
programs and revised reference files had to be tested. Several 
tests were conducted (in July 1967) in which the new computer 
system was employed to code a sample of the 1963 censuses 
establishment addresses. Preliminary analysis of the results of 
these tests indicated that the assignment of geographic codes 
was facilitated under the new computer system. 



The assignment of a numeric code to an establishment's 
address required an orderly arrangement and precise specifica- 
tion of conditions, rules, and actions in each step of the 
computer operation. The full address was first "unscrambled" 
(separated into components); each address component was then 
matched against the corresponding component in one or more 
of the records in the reference files. This computer matching 
process yielded a 15-digit numeric code (the first 10 digits 
identifying State, county, and place and providing a check-digit 
for punching verification; the next four digits identifying CBD, 
MRC, tract, a small city, or balance of county; and the last digit 
providing another check digit). 

Matching and Coding 

As previously mentioned, ZIP codes were used instead of State 
and place names to match establishment addresses with refer- 
ence file addresses. The reference file consisted of summary or 
"header" records which contained a 3-digit or 5-digit ZIP code 
and corresponding post office name, and detailed records which 
contained Soundex codes (phonetic translations of street 
names) and complete address components. If an address 
matched a 5-digit ZIP header record (which has no detailed 
street record), a unique code was assigned to the address. 
Unique codes were assigned to certain areas such as "balance of 
county" areas (all the remaining area of each county outside of 
incorporated places with 2,500 or more residents) and "special 
economic urban areas" selected on the basis of 1960 census 
information and designated by census analysts for special 
tabulation in the 1967 Economic Censuses. 

Computer assignment of geographic codes was accomplished 
in two stages. During the first stage, completed during the 
premail operations, codes were assigned to addresses in the 
master control file on the basis of the uncorrected ARF. The 
first stage processing resulted in approximately 1.2 million un- 
coded addresses from the single-unit universe of approximately 
4 million. The ARF was then resequenced, updated, and cor- 
rected. 

In the second stage of processing, after completed question- 
naires were received and the ARF was corrected, geographic 
codes were asigned to reported locations on the basis of the 
corrected ARF. "Flags" designating the reliability of the codes 
were entered in each address record processed. 

The codes originally assigned in stage one were those on the 
labels of all questionnaires mailed to firms canvassed in the 
1967 censuses. The stage-one system was tested by coding a 
sample of mailing addresses from the Internal Revenue Service 
(IRS) file of employers filing quarterly tax returns in calendar 
year 1966 and comparing these with codes assigned to a sample 
of establishments included in the 1963 censuses. In addition, 
two subsamples were selected from the IRS addresses. One was 
used for analyzing the characteristics of addresses of establish- 
ments to be included in the business census, and the other for 
testing the point system. 



CLERICAL CODING 

Clerical coding operations were parallel to computer coding 
operations but used data not available to the computer. Clerical 
procedures were established to accomplish place coding and 
tract coding. In addition, several operations were designed to 
handle special coding problems. 



24 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



A 2-volume manual, the 1967 Geographic Area Coding 
Manual, was prepared for guiding the place and tract coding 
operations. Volume I listed places arranged according to division 
(New England, Middle Atlantic States, etc.), State within 
division, county within State, and place, alphabetically, within 
county, with a 10-digit code corresponding to place. Informa- 
tion on places listed in Volume I was obtained from the follow- 
ing sources: 

1. 1960 Census of Population data 

2. Data in the Bureau's files showing municipalities in two or 
more counties, as of October 1967 

3. Special census reports issued prior to October 1967 

4. Municipal incorporations during 1960 and 1961, as 
reported in the 1962 Census of Governments 

5. 1966 Post Office Directory 

6. Data from the 1963 Economic Censuses 

Distinctive codes were assigned to the places to identify all 
statistical subdivisions in the 50 States and the District of 
Columbia for which data were to be collected and tabulated in 
the 1967 Economic Censuses. These statistical subdivisions 
included: 

1. All known incorporated places of 2,500 population or 
more as of October 1 967 

2. Special economic urban areas, as identified from 1960 
Census of Population data. 

3. "Balance of county" areas (all remaining areas of counties 
including incorporated places with fewer than 2,500 
residents and unincorporated localities) 

Volume II of the coding manual, an alphabetical cross 
reference, listed the following: 

1. All known incorporated places of 2,500 inhabitants or 
more as of October 1967 

2. Special economic urban areas 

3. Standard metropolitan statistical areas (names and 
definitions in terms of counties and towns comprising 
each SMSA, including revisions to May 1967) 

Clerical operations performed included the following: 

1 . Adding 6,000 records for Hawaii to the ARF 

2. Reviewing 13,000 CBD records, assigning ZIP codes to 
them, and transcribing approximately 4,500 new CBD 
records to the ARF 

3. Reviewing approximately 30,000 MRC records by 
comparing the newly developed MRC's with the Bureau's 
existing MRC file, and transcribing about 10,000 of these 
records to the ARF 



4. Reviewing edit corrections resulting from a review of the 
small city reference file by Census Bureau geographers, 
and, as a result of this review, correcting 2,500 records 

5. Adding about 85 variant spellings derived from the city 
reference file 

6. Making miscellaneous corrections, additions, and deletions 
to the ARF 

After mailout of census questionnaires, duplicate records 
were removed from the ARF, and the file was printed out by 
the computer. A "purge" list was then prepared to show over- 
laps in house number ranges, incorrect ZIP codes, and other 
inaccuracies in the ARF. In addition, listings of addresses not 
coded to place were developed. Clerks, following detailed 
instructions, reviewed the purge list, indicated corrections to be 
made in the ARF, and ultimately transcribed these corrections 
to the ARF. 

ASSIGNING FINAL GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODES 

In February 1968, the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division 
began revising the ARF on the basis of purge file information. 
By May 1968, the ARF had been corrected and was ready to be 
consolidated with the Building Reference File and City Refer- 
ence File to create one reference file. This consolidated file was 
used to assign final geographic codes after census questionnaires 
had been received but before tabulation of census data. This 
assignment of codes involved checking returned questionnaires 
against the file to identify establishments that had originally 
been assigned incorrect codes and those which required recoding 
because the physical address reported by respondents differed 
from the mailing address. 

Initial planning called for this second stage of coding to be 
accomplished in five computer runs after each of the five 
followups of delinquent companies. However, the size of the 
ARF (1.4 million records) and time and cost considerations 
reduced the number of runs to three, the first of which occurred 
in June 1968. The computer process was the same as that used 
for initial coding except that the geographic codes were assigned 
from the corrected ARF to all physical location addresses, 
original or changed, in records for which reports of location 
information had been received. 

Final coding was completed in June 1969, several months 
behind schedule. This delay resulted from several factors. 
Considerable clerical coding of records rejected by the computer 
was required, corrections for new incorporations and disin- 
corporations had been delayed, and place codes valid for 1963 
but not for 1967 had not been deleted. Also, the use of a 3-digit 
ZIP code for entering the coding file resulted, in a number of 
cases, in misassignment of area codes where the same street 
appeared in more than one 5-digit area within the 3-digit area. 



CHAPTER 



5 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 
PREPARATIONS FOR MAILING QUESTIONNAIRES 



Although the increased use of administrative records of the 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social Security Administra- 
tion (SSA) relieved from reporting requirements more than 60 
percent of the firms in the scope of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses, almost 2 million firms were still asked to complete 
census questionnaires. The companies canvassed were engaged in 
widely differing activities covering virtually the whole spectrum 
of the Nation's economy. Assembling into mailing packages the 
proper questionnaires, correctly labeled and coded, imprinted 
with the correct data where necessary, and combined with the 
correct instruction sheets, was an immensely complicated task; 
it required systematic planning, close cooperation and coordina- 
tion among various Census Bureau organizational units, and 
extensive use of automated procedures. 

INFORMATION MAILING 

In December 1966, instruction booklets and samples of census 
questionnaires were sent to approximately 5,000 large 
companies (mostly wholesalers, retailers, and service establish- 
ments) to inform them of the reporting requirements in the 
forthcoming economic censuses. The mailing list included all 
multiunit firms reporting 10 business establishments or more in 
the 1963 censuses, all large merchandising companies, manufac- 
turing companies reporting more than 100 employees in the 
1963 censuses, and mineral industries firms reporting more than 
500 employees in the 1963 censuses. 



NC-X3 General Schedule 

NC-X6 Central Administrative Offices or Auxiliary Estab- 
lishments 

NC-K1 Company Summary Report 

NC-K4M Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer (multi- 
unit) 

NC-K4S Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer (single 
unit) 

NC-K13 Company Exploration Expenditures (used only in 
census of mineral industries) 

NC-X2, Listing of Additional Establishments— This general 
questionnaire, included in the mailing package sent to each 
multiunit company, provided a convenient way for the 
company to furnish a list of its establishments for which 
questionnaires had not been received and to supply the basic 
information necessary for the Census Bureau to select and mail 
the appropriate questionnaires for these additional establish- 
ments. 

NC-X3, General Schedule— A general-use questionnaire, form 
NC-X3, was developed to obtain information from establish- 
ments for which no industry code was available to indicate the 
industry or business in which they were engaged. Census Bureau 
analysts used information provided by establishments complet- 
ing forms NC-X3 to determine which of these establishments 
were in scope. 



CENSUS QUESTIONNAIRES 

The approximately 440 different questionnaires used for the 
1967 censuses were, in general, similar to those used for the 
1963 censuses. Each questionnaire applied to a single industry 
or type of business. Differences in forms were primarily in the 
inquiries on products, materials, or merchandise lines. A dif- 
ferent form number was assigned to each type of questionnaire 
and placed in the address area, where it would be clearly visible 
through a window in the envelope. In addition, different colors 
were used to differentiate the various types of questionnaires. 
(Selected questionnaires are reproduced in appendix G.) 

General Forms 

The following general forms were used in the 1967 Censuses of 
Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries. 

NC-X1A, NC-X1B, NC-X1C Precanvass Questionnaires (de- 
scribed in chapter 3) 

NC-X2 Listing of Additional Establishments 



NC-X6, Central Administrative Offices or Auxiliary Establish- 
ments—Many multiunit companies maintain separate establish- 
ments to provide centralized administrative, management, or 
other supporting services for other establishments of the same 
company but not for the general public or other companies. 
These establishments were asked to complete form NC-X6. The 
form contained questions on approximate employment for such 
functions as centralized administration, research and develop- 
ment, warehousing, and other auxiliary activities, and on the 
cost of research and development work performed by the 
central administrative office or auxiliary establishment. 



NC-K1, Company Summary Report— Each multiunit company 
with 250 employees or more received a form NC-K1, Company 
Summary Report, along with the appropriate questionnaires for 
its establishments. The NC-K1 requested consolidated company 
totals for key data items, such as receipts, new capital expendi- 
tures, inventories, and fixed assets. In addition, each company 
was asked to distribute its 1967 employment reported on its 



25 



26 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



establishment questionnaires by the employer identification 
(El) number and to compare these totals with the figures 
reported on its form 941 tax returns. The Bureau could thereby 
ascertain that all domestic establishments of each large multi- 
unit firm and its subsidiaries would be covered. Information 
supplied on NC-K1 forms served a variety of operational and 
statistical purposes and provided data for the enterprise 
statistics publications. 

NC-K4M and NC-K4S, Distribution of Sales by Class of 

Customer— The survey on distribution of sales by class of 
customer, accomplished at 10-year intervals, had last been 
conducted as part of the 1958 Census of Manufactures. Repeat- 
ing 1958 procedures, the 1967 survey was conducted on a 
sample basis, using the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) 
pane! but eliminating companies with all establishments in 
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) major group 23 (apparel 
and other finished products made from fabrics and similar 
materials) and SIC major group 27 (printing, publishing, and 
allied industries). It was therefore possible to conduct this 
survey without incurring sample design costs. 

NC-K4M questionnaires were sent to all multiunit firms in 
the sample and to single-unit companies in the sample if they 
had 1,000 employees or more— about 700 multiunit companies 
and 100 single-unit firms. The firms were asked to summarize 
their sales by class of customer, giving these breakdowns by 
company and establishment total sales and by individual 
product. The class-of-customer category also included intra- 
company shipments. If the firm operated through its own sales 
branch or sales office, sales from these branches or offices were 
also to be summarized by class of customer. 

NC-K4S questionnaires were sent to single-unit firms in the 
ASM panel with fewer than 1,000 employees. These smaller 
companies were asked to distribute the total value of products 
shipped by class of customer, but breakdowns by product group 
were not required. 

NC-K13, Company Exploration Expenditures— This new 

questionnaire was developed in response to industry's urging 
that the Census Bureau collect information on expenditures for 
exploration for minerals and on gross book value of mineral 
assets. The NC-K13 questionnaire was sent to a sample of the 
companies canvassed in the 1967 Census of Mineral Industries. 

Business Census Questionnaires 

Although the 1967 Census of Business questionnaires were 
generally patterned after their 1963 counterparts, some changes 
were made in an attempt to improve response. The typeface was 
carefully selected to improve the readability of the question- 
naires, inquiries were simplified, and, in many cases, instructions 
to respondents were clarified. Whenever possible, multiple-choice 
questions were used to assist the respondent and to expedite the 
processing of returns. When information obtained in the 1963 
censuses or current surveys or from other sources indicated that 
special attention should be given to certain categories of 
businesses, new questionnaires were developed to meet the new 
requirements. A major innovation for the 1967 censuses was the 
addition of an inquiry on floor space— both total space and 
selling space— in retail establishments. Business census question- 
naires were pretested, with particular emphasis on testing the 
new inquiry on floor space. In addition, new questionnaires had 
to be designed for travel agencies, legal services, and archi- 



tectural and engineering services, since these activities had not 
been included in previous censuses. 

Approximately 140 different questionnaires were used for 
the 1967 business census. For most kinds of business two types 
of questionnaires were utilized, one for the establishments of 
multiunit companies and the other for single-unit firms. The 
two versions of business census questionnaires were virtually 
identical, the principal difference being that the questionnaires 
designed for multiunit companies omitted questions that asked 
for information that would be obtained from the administrative 
records of IRS and SSA. Multiunit questionnaires were 
identified by a suffix (-1) to the form number, permitting 
returns to be more easily sorted for control purposes. 

Manufactures and Mineral Industries Questionnaires 

More than 250 different types of questionnaires were used to 
collect information from the many different types of manufac- 
turing companies and mining concerns canvassed in the 1967 
Censuses of Manufactures and Mineral Industries. The first two 
pages of all questionnaires included standard data items 
(number of employees, payrolls, etc.) required of all establish- 
ments. In addition, each of the various questionnaires listed the 
important products of the particular industry or group of 
related industries and the principal materials consumed. Special 
inquiries covering such topics as equipment used, method of 
operation, and distribution of products were also included. 
Mineral industries questionnaires were imprinted with cor- 
responding data reported by each establishment in the 1963 
Census of Mineral Industries. 

Each questionnaire included a special note reminding the 
respondent to check all data reported on his questionnaire and 
emphasizing that relationships between certain items (such as 
between production workers' wages and total man-hours) 
should be checked for reasonableness. Respondents were 
informed that the Census Bureau would review each question- 
naire for omissions, inconsistencies, and unusual ratios. If 
products to be listed on the questionnaire were also reported in 
another Census Bureau survey, respondents were cautioned that 
the two reports should agree. 

Questionnaires for ASM companies— The nucleus of the 1967 
Census of Manufactures was the panel of about 60,000 manu- 
facturing firms included in the 1966 ASM. The ASM covers all 
large manufacturing plants and a representative sample of the 
smaller ones, accounting for more than 75 percent of the 
Nation's manufacturing activity. 

The ASM questionnaire (form MA-100) served as the first 
two pages of the 1967 Census of Manufactures questionnaire for 
ASM respondents. It contained general questions on such topics 
as employment, payroll, and man hours, and requested informa- 
tion on the respondent's operations during the years 1966 and 
1967. Figures provided by the respondent in the 1966 ASM 
were printed on each form MA-100 by the high-speed printer. 
They served the twofold purpose of utilizing the respondent's 
prior experience in completing a questionnaire of this type and 
conveniently providing the previous year's data to assure report- 
ing consistency. Another advantage was that many of the 
computer programs used in previous ASM's could be reused, 
including an editing and correction program which edited each 
respondent's current-year data against figures that had been 
reviewed and accepted for the previous year. Imprinted ASM 
forms were later assembled with the supplemental census form 
for mailing to each respondent. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



27 



ASM companies also received a questionnaire (form MA-101 ) 
containing inquiries on expenditures for plants and equipment 
during 1967 for manufacturing plants under construction. ASM 
companies with payrolls of less than $1 million but which 
reported plants under construction in the 1967 precanvass were 
also sent MA-101 questionnaires. 

MAILING PIECES 

In addition to the questionnaires, several other preprinted mail- 
ing pieces were required for the 1967 censuses mailing packages; 
these included envelopes, cover letters, and instruction 
materials. Printing requirements were determined early in 1967 
to assure that material would be ready for the mailing-assembly 
operation that was to begin in December 1967. 

Cover Letters 

A general cover letter was enclosed in mailing packages sent to 
single-unit companies; it informed the respondent that he was 
required by law to complete and return his questionnaire, that 
the information he provided would be held in strict confidence, 
and that the deadline for returning questionnaires was April 30, 
1968. The cover letter was preprinted in the limited space 
available on the tear-off section of the return envelope. 

Some special situations warranted special letters. For re- 
spondents in the ASM panel, the cover letter also included an 
explanation of the integration of the annual survey with the 
1967 censuses and referred to the special instruction manual 
enclosed with the questionnaire. The cover letter for retail 
establishments called attention to the inquiries for merchandise- 
line data. The special cover letter for multiunit firms asked 
respondents to complete form NC-X2, Listing of Additional 
Establishments Engaged in Census Covered Activities, so that 
the Census Bureau could send the proper questionnaires to 
establishments not included in the original mailing. 

Instructions 

Several general instruction booklets were prepared to assist 
respondents in completing questionnaires for the 1967 
Economic Censuses. In addition, separate detailed instruction 
manuals were printed for establishments in a few kinds of 
business and in certain mineral industries with peculiar reporting 
problems, as well as for manufacturing establishments reporting 
on the detailed standard forms. 

Envelopes 

A "self-mailer" envelope designed to serve "triple duty" as a 
mailing envelope, cover letter, and return envelope, was utilized 
in mailing questionnaires to most single-unit business establish- 
ments. The cover letter, printed on the inside of the flap, could 
be separated at the perforation, leaving a convenient return 
envelope. A window in the flap exposed the mailing label with 
the establishment address, which was affixed to the question- 
naire. The questionnaire was inserted under the flap only and 
stapled to the envelope. Instructions on the envelope cautioned 
the addressee to remove the staple carefully so that he could use 
the envelope to return his completed questionnaire. 

This self-mailer envelope was first used in the 1958 
Economic Censuses and was reused with few modifications for 
the 1963 censuses. Its main purposes were to eliminate the as- 
sembly operation required to enclose transmittal letters and 
return envelopes in the mailing packages, reduce printing costs, 
and decrease the number of misdirected returns. 



Another special envelope was prepared for mailing the 
MA-100 questionnaires to firms in the ASM panel. Since 1966 
data were printed on the MA-100 forms prior to mailing, a 
"closed-window" envelope was required to safeguard the con- 
fidentiality of this information. The mailing packages contained 
preaddressed return envelopes which fit into the mailing 
package without folding. 

Mailing Labels 

The 1963 procedure for automated addressing operations was 
again used for the 1967 censuses, with only a few minor 
modifications. The high-speed printer printed mailing labels in 
three vertical columns. These columns were then cut into three 
continuous strips and verified, after which a Cheshire labeling 
machine was used to affix the labels to the standard mailing 
packages. In addition to the usual address information, these 
labels also contained coded information about the establishment 
(such as size, type of operation, etc.). 

Followup Notices 

Companies that did not return their questionnaires by the 
established deadline had to be reminded that their returns were 
overdue. Experiences in previous economic censuses indicated 
that about half of the establishments included in the original 
mailout would have to be included in the first followup. To 
eliminate the time-consuming task of attaching mailing labels to 
followup mailing pieces, a reminder card was used for the first 
followup. The reminder notices were preprinted on continuous- 
form card stock three across and four down on each fold of the 
form, enabling the high-speed printer to address three cards 
simultaneously. The card stock was perforated between the 
rows so that the addressed cards could be separated horizontally 
by a "bursting" machine after they had been cut into three 
vertical strips. The cards could then be dropped directly into 
mail bags for shipment to the post office. 

Form letters were used in the five subsequent followups. 
Two basic letter formats were utilized, one for multiunit 
companies that had returned questionnaires for some but not all 
establishments (sent with a listing of establishments still delin- 
quent), and the other for companies that had not responded 
at all, including single-unit firms. A third special form letter was 
used as a reminder to companies that had already requested 
and been granted an extension of the deadline. 



MAILING LISTS 



Multiunit Listing 



Computer programing for the multiunit-company mailing list 
was accomplished during the period August 1967 to January 
1968. The primary source of this list was the multiunit pre- 
canvass conducted specifically for this purpose. (See "Develop- 
ing the Mailing List for Multiunit Companies: The Precanvass," 
chapter 3, p. 17.) In this precanvass, each company was asked to 
provide updated information on its establishments. Cards were 
punched from the updated listings and were sorted by census 
file number, edited, corrected, and assigned geographic codes. 
This corrected, unduplicated address file was then separated 
into three lists: the company list; the ASM and mineral 
industries multiunit establishment list; and the multiunit estab- 
lishment list for businesses and non-ASM manufacturing firms. 
Establishment addresses on these lists were arranged by 
questionnaire form number to expedite labeling and assembly 
operations. 



28 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



At the same time, control listings of establishments, by 
company, were developed sp that the addressed questionnaires 
could be assembled into company packages for mailing. Copies 
of these listings were later utilized in the check-in operation to 
assure that questionnaires had been received from all establish- 
ments of a particular company. 

Single-Unit Listing 

The single-unit mailing list was developed primarily from the 
name and address file of employers that was used by the I RS to 
mail Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Returns (form 941 's) to 
companies with employees. This file was first matched to the 
multiunit file to eliminate any establishments of multiunit 
companies. It was then matched to the 1963 census records to 
obtain classification information for each establishment, and 
new establishments were matched to SSA records to obtain 
industry classification necessary for determining which estab- 
lishments were within the scope of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses. When the payroll tax file for the first quarter of 1967 
was obtained from the IRS, an employment size code was added 
to the establishment record. The size code was primarily used to 
select the samples and to determine the mail/nonmail universe. 

Mailing Labels 

In addition to certain codes to be used in processing the 
returned questionnaires, the 1967 censuses mailing label 
contained all information necessary for mailing out and 



checking in a census questionnaire. The following sample label, 
on which lines have been numbered for reference purposes, il- 
lustrates the arrangement of information. Line 1 contained the 
establishment's census file number (referred to as the ID 
number), the source code, and the El number; line 2, the type 
of operation code (T/O code), the SIC code, a "master sample" 
code, and the form number of the questionnaire to be mailed; 
line 3, the geographic area code; and lines 4, 5, 6, and 7, the 
company name, street address, city, State, and ZIP code, 
respectively. 

Census Identification Numbers 

The census file number (also known as the ID number) was an 
important part of each census record for control, matching, and 
processing establishment records. 

The ID numbers assigned to single-unit employer companies 
were taken from IRS and SSA records used in preparing the 
mailing lists for the censuses. These records include a 9-digit El 
number uniquely identifying each company. The Census Bureau 
modified this El number by inserting a zero as a prefix digit to 
identify the respondent as a single-unit firm. For multiunits, the 
Bureau assigned a distinctive alpha number code. The first six 
digits of a multiunit census file number were known as the alpha 
number, which always began with a number other than zero or 
nine and was constant for all plants of the company. For each 
of the company's establishments, a unique 4-digit number was 
added to the company number. A cross-reference file was estab- 
lished which identified the El number under which each 
establishment of a multiunit company operated. 



Address Label Format 



■Type of operation code 
SIC Sample 



El No. 




873322 0002 8 



PRIMARY NAME OF COMPANY 
ADDITIONAL NAME (IF ANY) 
STREET ADDRESS 
CITY STATE ZIP CODE 



1 ' 5013(Xr8 r 43(r9 50A1- 
#: 93 938 2040 3 1234 4 





•Employment size 
■Form No. 



Geographic State County Place Tract 
symbol 



Single digits not explained in the diagram above are check digits. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



29 



Alpha numbers were assigned to companies in such a manner 
as to put the companies in approximately alphabetic order when 
they were listed by census file number in numeric sequence. As 
early as 1947, the Census Bureau had begun utilizing an alpha- 
numeric system of identification for multiunit companies. The 
system was expanded to a 10-digit ID number for the 1954 
Economic Censuses. 

Check digit-A check digit was added to the 10-digit identifica- 
tion number to verify the accuracy of the identification number 
recorded on punchcards or electronic tape when the completed 
report was processed. The card-punching equipment was wired 
to compute a check digit for each identification number 
punched. If the check digit on the label differed from the 
computed check digit, the machine locked, thereby alerting the 
operator to the error. Electronic equipment used for processing 
returns was also programed to discover errors when reading 
census file numbers from magnetic tape. Check digits for ad- 
ditions and corrections to the mailing lists were assigned 
clerically, using a desk machine termed the "check-digit 
computer" which had been developed specifically for this 
purpose. 



IMPRINTING ASM QUESTIONNAIRES 

As explained before, the ASM questionnaire (form MA-100) 
constituted the first two pages of the 1967 Census of Manufac- 
tures questionnaire for those companies included in both the 
ASM and the manufactures census. Although these pages 
contained the same items as the ASM questionnaire used in 
intercensal years, there were some modifications. Item 1, on 
physical location, required more precise information on the 
exact physical location of each establishment. Item 9 (product 
inquiry) was expanded to include a column requesting quantity 
of some products in addition to the column for value of the 
products. A column containing 1966 ASM data was also 
provided. 

Computers were used to update the 1966 ASM address file 
with information supplied by the multiunit precanvass, and to 
divide the addresses into two files, one for establishments of 
multiunit firms and the other for single-unit companies. 
Although the single-unit and multiunit firms were processed 
separately, computer procedures were essentially the same for 
both address files. Updated addresses were matched to the ASM 
data file to obtain 1966 data, and the appropriate census 
questionnaire to be sent to each establishment was determined 
on the basis of the establishment's 1966 industry classification. 
Ultimately, the file was composed of the mailing address and 
1966 data for each ASM establishment, arranged by identifica- 
tion number. 

Special procedures were needed to prepare questionnaires for 
the ASM panel for assembly into mailing packages. Mailing 
labels and 1966 data were printed on the questionnaires 
simultaneously by the high-speed printer. However, in many 
cases there was not enough room to record all products reported 
in 1966. These additional product data were listed on a separate 
tabulation (termed the "excess product listing") so that they 
could be typed on the second page of the questionnaire. Entries 
were verified completely, and the errors of each typist were 
recorded on a quality control form. 

The 1967 ASM company file was also checked against ASM 
questionnaires submitted in 1966 by companies added to the 
panel in that year. The computer compared the listing of 1966 



ASM companies with the data file used to imprint 1967 
questionnaires. This program produced a listing of firms 
included in the 1966 ASM but for which data were not printed 
on the 1967 questionnaires. Clerks used the listings to note 
additions to the 1967 file, but all notations were examined by 
subject-matter specialists before this file was corrected. 

In a final review of the imprinted questionnaires, the address 
labels for all questionnaires for multiunit companies were 
compared with the precanvass questionnaire returned by each of 
these companies, and the SIC code was checked against the 
form number to insure that the correct census questionnaire was 
being sent. Inactive plants were deleted from the mailing list, 
and imprinted ASM forms without address labels were checked 
for duplication before being addressed from the company's pre- 
canvass listing. A coverage check of the ASM questionnaires was 
also performed by comparing a computer listing of the ad- 
dressed forms with a reproduced set of establishment records 
from the precanvass. 



PREPARATION AND CONTROL OF MAILOUT MATERIALS 

In general, printing contractors delivered the census question- 
naires, instruction booklets, envelopes, and other mailing 
supplies to the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division. 
However, questionnaires to be imprinted and addressed by the 
high-speed printers had to be delivered to the Census Bureau's 
Suitland, Md., headquarters, where the electronic equipment 
was located. The Suitland office developed computer record 
counts of the number of questionnaires required for the mail- 
out, printed the labels, and accepted delivery of questionnaires 
requiring imprinted information, such as the ASM question- 
naires and census of mineral industries questionnaires. 

Quality and Quantity Inspections 

Before the questionnaires were imprinted at Bureau head- 
quarters, the physical quantity of each form delivered by 
contractors was checked against computer record counts 
indicating requirements, and if the quantity was less than 120 
percent of the record count, additional questionnaires were 
ordered. After the questionnaires were imprinted but before 
they were shipped to Jeffersonville, a quality inspection was 
conducted. Quality control requirements were established to 
prevent omissions or duplications, to assure correct reprinting of 
rejected work, to eliminate delays in processing forms and trans- 
mitting them to Jeffersonville, and to provide feedback on 
problem areas. The printed data were further inspected to insure 
that all data tape reels had been printed, that the number of 
labels printed corresponded to the record count, and that all 
printed data were properly identified. Furthermore, a 10- 
percent sample of the printed pages was inspected to determine 
if the printing was legible, if labels were positioned correctly, 
and if the correct form number appeared in the establishment 
labels. 

After the quality inspection had been completed, the 
questionnaires were repacked and, together with the computer 
record counts, company master and establishment labels, and 
the original copy of the company master control listing, were 
transmitted to Jeffersonville, where the mailing packages were 
assembled. 

Jeffersonville personnel carefully checked shipments of 
questionnaires and other mailing materials received from print- 
ing contractors and from Census Bureau headquarters, a 
modification of the 1963 censuses procedures, under which 



30 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



quality control of printed forms was accomplished at the print- 
ing plants. If quantities included in shipments did not agree with 
totals listed on bills of lading, the Jeffersonville staff notified 
the printing contractors or Bureau headquarters to initiate 
corrective action. Weekly control sheets were maintained to 
show amounts ordered and received, and past-due shipments 
were followed up until delivery was made. Jeffersonville person- 
nel compared quantities of questionnaires on hand with require- 
ments specified in the computer record counts forwarded from 
Bureau headquarters. If the numbers of forms or enclosures was 



less than 120 percent of the specified requirements. Bureau 
headquarters was immediately informed. 

Questionnaires received in Jeffersonville were stored in a 
stockroom, where they were filed separately by form number, 
with a receiving record attached. The stock clerk prepared a 
stock-control card for each shipment he received. These cards 
were used to maintain a perpetual inventory and to insure that 
at least 120 percent of the designated requirements were on 
hand for each item. The stock clerk issued materials to the 
assembly units as required for assembly of mailing packages. 




I 
I I r 



Imprinting Mailing Labels 

When the name and address register (or mailing register) for 
multiunit companies had been completed, company labels were 
prepared for multiunit mailing packages and for NC-X2 forms 
(request for additional questionnaires). In addition, establish- 
ment labels were printed for questionnaires to be included in 
the mailing packages sent to multiunit firms. All of these labels 
were printed during the period December 9, 1967, through 
January 15, 1968. Labels for all mailing packages for single-unit 
companies were printed during the period January 8 to April 
18, 1968. 



Labels were printed by high-speed printers on continuous- 
form paper, using name-and-address tapes developed on the 
1107 computer. The label paper contained preprinted guide 
marks for the use of the machine operator, who checked the 
first test label on each reel of labels to ascertain that a dot 
appearing in the address coincided with a preprinted guide box 
on the form paper, thereby indicating that the address labels 
were positioned properly. Each label also contained a guide box 
enabling the operator to check alinement of printing and guide 
marks at frequent intervals. If he discovered any defective 
labels, he crossed them out and printed new labels. Quality 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



31 



control of the printing operation was achieved by verifying a 
sample of the identification codes and geographic codes. 

Cutting and Splicing Labels 

As previously mentioned, mailing labels were printed in three 
columns so that each horizontal line consisted of three copies of 
the same label. Before these labels were shipped to Jeffersonville 
for the labeling operation, a cutting machine was used to 
separate the columns into continuous strips, and this operation 
was inspected on a 100-percent basis. After the cutting opera- 
tion, defective labels were removed from the strips, and the 
correct labels were spliced to form a single strip for each set of 
form numbers or for one labeling work unit. The splicing opera- 
tion was also 100 percent verified. 

Labeling Operation 

The labeling operation was performed at the Jeffersonville 
Census Operations Division, where automatic mailing machines 
were used to label the various questionnaires and envelopes. 
Work units delivered to the machine consisted of a stack of 
forms and a set of address labels with the same form number. 
The labeling machine was loaded with a label strip and a stack 
of questionnaires with the same form number, and the machine 
separated each label from the strip and applied it to the form. 

During the labeling run, labeled questionnaires were 
inspected for mutilations or other defects, and the machine was 
stopped when defects were observed. Questionnaires with 
defective labels were then discarded and mutilated labels 
retyped. At a second inspection point at the end of the 
conveyor belt, the first copy of each type of questionnaire was 
examined to assure correct alinement. 

For each form number run, the inspectors recorded on an 
inspection record information about any defective labeling they 
discovered. This record was used for quality-control purposes. 
Possible defects included: 

1. Incorrect forms for the particular label affixed 

2. Incorrect form used (such as labeling a form which had 
been revised) 

3. Labels or questionnaires mutilated 

4. Incorrect feeding of material into the labeling machine 

5. Incorrect positioning of labels (such as to the back of the 
form) 

One major problem requiring immediate corrective action 
was that, in many cases, when the labels were attached to the 
forms, the two arrows on the forms did not point to the 
numbers to which they referred (to the census file number and 
to the El number). 

Assembling the Mailing Packages 

Mailing packages were assembled primarily on the basis of in- 
formation contained on the preprinted mailing labels; these 
labels listed all information required to mail and check in a 
census questionnaire. Instruction booklets, cover letters, and 
other materials were then added to the mailing packages in ac- 
cordance with detailed instructions for each questionnaire form 
number. Priority was given to assembling mailing packages for 
the large companies because questionnaires for these companies 
were to be mailed first. 



Although the mailout control listing for multiunit companies 
did not become available until mid-January 1968 (and then only 
on a flow basis), mailing packages for the approximately 700 
complex multiunit firms were prepared in late December 1967 
based on information supplied by these firms in the precanvass. 
(See "Special Handling of Complex Companies," chapter 
3, p. 17.) This additional time was provided because it was 
anticipated that problems involving overlap and duplication 
would have to be resolved. The assembly operations for the 
other mailing packages began as soon as the multiunit control 
listings were available. 

Using these control listings and procedures manuals to deter- 
mine necessary enclosures, a list of enclosures was prepared for 
each multiunit company and attached to its folder. As a first 
step, one copy of the multiunit cover letter and the multiunit 
return envelopes were placed in each folder. Other enclosures, 
such as instruction booklets, were then taken from supply bins 
and placed in the folders. As these items were put into the 
folders, they were checked off the list of enclosures maintained 
for each company. Before the questionnaires for individual 
establishments were placed in the company folders, they were 
carefully checked against the control listings to verify form 
numbers. Firms included in the December mailout to complex 
companies were sent only those additional forms (if any) that 
had not been sent in the original package. 

As previously mentioned, imprinted ASM questionnaires 
comprised the first two pages of the general census of manu- 
factures questionnaires. In addition, the first two pages of all 
census of manufactures and census of mineral industries report 
forms included standard data items while the following pages 
contained special inquiries tailored to particular industries or 
groups of industries. In assembling mailing packages, clerks had 
to be extremely careful to match correctly the two parts of 
these questionnaires. Meticulous attention to detail was also 
necessary to assure that the appropriate general questionnaires 
were included in the mailing packages when necessary. (See 
"General Forms," chapter 5, p. 25.) 

A two-stage verification plan was designed to control the 
assembly of mailing packages for multiunit firms. The first stage 
included prepackaging operations while the second stage en- 
compassed only the actual packaging operation. Stage one 
defects included, for example, improper assignment of SIC 
codes and failure to prepare correctly the listings of excess 
product classes. Examples of stage two defects were out- 
of-sequence labels and failure of census file numbers to match 
control numbers. 

Further verification was accomplished to assure that cor- 
rections made to mailing pieces also appeared on the control 
listings, and vice versa. Particular care was taken to ascertain 
that questionnaires for only one company were included in a 
mailing package, because if a form with preprinted data for one 
company was inadvertently placed in another firm's mailing 
package, the confidentiality rules would be violated. 

In addition to the two-stage verification, there was a 
2-percent sample reverification of packages through all stages of 
preliminary processing and actual processing. This reverification 
involved ascertaining that all corrections required in pre- 
packaging processing had been made and that mailing packages 
were complete and correct. Detailed verification records and 
reverification records for both prepackaging and packaging 
operations were maintained. 



32 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



The final step in the verification process was an analysis of 
the possible effect of errors on the mailing operation. If an error 
involving any particular group of mailing packages was deemed 
critical, every mailing package in that group was rejected, and 
the packaging procedures were repeated. 

A small number of companies had requested that their 
mailing packages receive special handling so that they could 
provide the required information more conveniently. For 
example, some companies asked that questionnaires for each of 
their subsidiaries be sent to the physical location of the 
subsidiary or that the questionnaires be sequenced in some 
special manner in the mailing package (such as by store or plant 
number). 

When all mailing packages for multiunit firms had been as- 
sembled, verified, and corrected, the cover letters were dated 
and the packages sealed. The mailing dates were stamped on the 
control listings when the packages were mailed. Census analysts 
then inspected the control listings. Any companies on the list 
without a stamped mailing date were either added to the mailing 
list as "true" multiunits (in which case mailing packages had to 
be assembled for them) or, if a record check revealed that they 
were not true multiunits, deleted from the file. 

The procedures for assembling mailing packages for single- 
unit companies with imprinted data were basically the same as 
the procedures for multiunit firms. Questionnaires were im- 
printed at Census Bureau headquarters and shipped to Jefferson- 
ville, where the forms, instruction booklets, return envelopes. 



and other materials were packaged in a closed-window mailing 
envelope to prevent disclosure of confidential data. These 
packages were 100-percent verified, and a 2-percent random 
sample was reverified. 

Most of the other single-unit mailing packages were of the 
standard "wraparound" variety preassembled at the printing 
plant before delivery to Jeffersonville. (See "Mailing Pieces," 
chapter 5, p. 27.) The labeling machines were used to label these 
preassembled packages, which were verified on a 1-in-500 
sample basis. Preassembled mailing packages for some 
companies, usually employers which had not been assigned an 
SIC code, had to be labeled manually. Labels for these firms 
were prepared in duplicate so that census analysts could use one 
set of labels in their attempts to determine the specific types of 
businesses engaged in by these companies and assign appropriate 
codes. If a code could be determined for a particular company, 
it was inserted in the computer record of the mailing file, and 
appropriate census questionnaires were mailed. If a code could 
not be ascertained, the company was sent a form NC-X3 
(General Schedule). 

As the mailing packages for single-unit companies were 
assembled and mailed, they were checked off the single-unit 
control listing. Any companies remaining on the control listing 
after completion of the mailout were either deleted from the 
control file or added to the mailing on the basis of record 
checks. 



CHAPTER 



6 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries 
DATA COLLECTION OPERATIONS 



Data collection operations in the 1967 Economic Censuses were 
similar to the procedures used in the 1963 censuses, with 
various refinements and improvements. (See "Innovations," 
chapter 1, p. 4.) The larger companies were enumerated in a 
mail canvass, requiring that the Census Bureau develop and 
implement intricate procedures for mailing out questionnaires, 
checking in returns, and following up nonrespondents. Data for 
the smaller companies were extracted from the administrative 
records of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social 
Security Administration (SSA). This required detailed planning 
and the development and maintenance of close working 
relationships between the Census Bureau and IRS and SSA. (See 
"Planning the Use of Data From Administrative Records," 
chapter 2, p. 12.) 



THE MAIL CANVASS 

Mailout of Questionnaires 

The mailout of 1967 Economic Censuses questionnaires was 
accomplished during the period January through April 1968. 
Approximately 2.2 million questionnaires were mailed in the 
1967 censuses, about 700,000 less than the 1963 mailout, a 
decrease resulting primarily from the extended use of admin- 
istrative records of other agencies in lieu of census reports. 
Included in this mailout were approximaely 1.7 million single- 
unit establishments and about 40,000 multiunit firms with a 
total of more than 400,000 establishments. Between March 28 
and April 19, 1968, a supplemental mailout was completed. 
This mailout included about 300,000 new companies identified 
primarily from the IRS file of new employers (births) and more 
than 100,000 firms for which industry classification had to be 
determined because they were not classified in IRS and SSA 
records. 

Check-in of Receipts 

A crucial part of the 1967 Economic Censuses was the process 
of checking in completed questionnaires and correspondence 
generated by the mail canvass. This check-in operation was ac- 
complished at the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division 
beginning in February 1968. The check-in system was designed 
to insure that incoming mail, including requests for extensions 
of deadlines, would be processed properly and that only true 
delinquent respondents would be included in the followup 
mailings. 

Sample selection of mail receipts— Procedures were established 
by which a daily sample of the questionnaires and cor- 



respondence received in Jeffersonville was selected and 
analyzed in detail. The selection was made at the following 
rates: 



Packages with or without 
correspondence 



Correspondence 



Single units Multiunits 



Congressional Other 



1/500 1/100 1/1 1/50 

Action codes— In the 1967 censuses, as in the 1963 censuses, the 
followup of unreturned questionnaires was controlled elec- 
tronically. One of the following action codes was assigned by 
clerks to each receipt as it was checked in and was used by the 
computer to control the sending of reminder notices to delin- 
quent firms: 

Action code Explanation 

Postmaster returns (questionnaire returned by 

the post office; excluded from followup) 

1,2,3 Questionnaires to be remailed and deadline 

extended 

4, 5, 6 Deadline extended 

7 Firms for which data could be imputed from 

administrative records (excluded from follow- 
up) 

8 Complicated cases requiring decision by subject 

analysts, indefinite hold (excluded from follow- 
up pending analyst decision) 

9 Questionnaire received and/or reporting 

requirement satisfied (excluded from followup) 

Check-in correction form (EC-76)— The name and address file 
for each company and establishment had to be maintained 
systematically and accurately during all stages in processing the 
1967 Economic Censuses; all changes, revisions, additions, and 
deletions affecting existing records had to be reflected. 

Form EC-76, the check-in correction form, was the primary 
instrument used to reflect these changes. When census question- 
naires or correspondence being processed in any of the various 
Jeffersonville processing units revealed a change affecting exist- 
ing records, an EC-76 form was prepared. Examples of specific 
cases requiring preparation of a form EC-76 included: 

1. Newly-created multiunit companies which required full 
mailing label information for the company itself and for 
its individual establishments ("splitter" cases) 

2. Blank forms or correspondence returned by respondents, 
or postmaster returns. An EC-76 form was prepared if the 
decision was made to impute information for the firm. 

3. Information from a company indicated that it should be 
included in another census (for example, a firm which 

33 



34 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



received census of business questionnaires but which 
indicated that its activities should actually be covered by 
the census of manufactures). In such cases, an inter-census 
report transcription was prepared. 

4. Establishments to which new alpha numbers were assigned 

5. Establishments to which new plant numbers were assigned 

6. Establishments involved in merger or acquisition 

7. Establishments discovered to be out of scope 

A separate EC-76 form was prepared for each single-unit firm 
and each establishment of a multiunit firm requiring corrective 
action. The form EC-76 became such a vital instrument during 
prepunch clerical operations that the Census Common Questions 
Coordinating Committee (see "Planning Committees," chapter 
1, p. 10.) decided that subject-matter analysts at all levels would 
benefit from being trained in the purposes and use of this 
form. Training sessions were held during the first week in 
May 1968, and the training was credited with helping to 
alleviate backlogs in processing units while providing analysts 
with detailed information about the various computer files 
being utilized and the methods for correcting them. 

Postmaster returns— Mailing packages for about 61,750 single- 
unit companies and 530 multiunit firms were returned by the 
post office as undeliverable. These cases were referred to as 
postmaster returns (PMR's). 

PMR's from single-unit firms were divided into two groups— 
those for companies with fewer than 10 employees, and those 
for firms with 10 employees or more. Cards were punched at 
Jeffersonville for firms in the second category and were 
transmitted to Census Bureau headquarters. Arrangements were 
made for SSA to match these cards, by El (employer identifica- 
tion) number and by company name and address, to its records 
of firms active as of December 31, 1967. SSA was successful in 
locating new addresses or verifying old addresses for most of the 
cases referred. 

A second attempt was made to deliver questionnaires to 
single-unit firms with 10 employees or more even if no later 
address could be located (with the exception of companies 
marked "out-of-business" by the post office). When these 
packages were remailed, a form letter extending the filing dead- 
line was enclosed, the action codes in the file of delinquent 
companies were changed (so that firms whose packages were 
remailed would not be included in the initial followup), and the 
envelope was stamped with an "S" to indicate that the package 
was being mailed for the second time. Mailing packages stamped 
"out-of-business" by the post office and all packages not 
delivered in the second mailing were referred to census analysts 
for disposition (imputation, remailing, or removal from the 
delinquency file). PMR's for single-unit firms with less than 10 
employees were not remailed; census data for these companies 
were developed on the basis of data reported to IRS or SSA. 

Strenuous efforts were made to locate new addresses for 
multiunit PMR's, particularly those with 100 employees or 
more, because it would be extremely difficult to impute valid 
data for companies of this size. The primary reference docu- 
ment used in processing multiunit PMR's was the Administrative 
Records Data Listing (ARDL). This listing contained the names, 
addresses, and various codes for each establishment in IRS and 
SSA administrative record files, along with employment and 
payroll data. The ARDL was also of particular importance in 
controlling multiunit coverage. 



In processing the multiunit PMR's, census analysts compared 
the alpha number of each PMR with alpha numbers listed on the 
ARDL. (See "Census Identification Numbers," chapter 5, 
p. 28.) If the PMR alpha number did not appear in the 
ARDL, an EC-76 correction form was prepared to delete the 
company. In these cases, the company folder was removed from 
the active file, and the folder, mailout control listing, and PMR 
mailing envelope were annotated "PMR Delete— Not on 
ARDL." 

If the PMR alpha number was listed on the ARDL, the 
analysts scanned the employer identification (El) numbers on 
the ARDL to locate the company name and address. If a 
different address appeared on the ARDL, the mailing package 
was prepared for remailing by completing an EC-76 correction 
form to correct the master address, pulling the company folder 
to correct the address on the mailout control listing, and 
referring the package to the correspondence unit for remailing. 

If the ARDL address was the same as the company address 
on the mailing package, and if the company's payroll informa- 
tion was included in the ARDL, the entire PMR mailing package 
and the company folder were referred to a task force at Census 
Bureau headquarters, and a form EC-76 was prepared to initiate 
an indefinite "hold action" pending a decision by the task force 
on whether or not the package should be remailed. If no payroll 
information was listed and no other El numbers for the 
company could be located in the ARDL (or none of the El 
numbers had corresponding payroll information), a form EC-76 
was prepared to delete the company. When one or more of the 
company's other El numbers did list payroll information, the 
mailing package was remailed to the establishment with the 
largest payroll. 

PMR's were analyzed on a weekly basis throughout the data- 
collection operations. A 10-percent sample of single-unit PMR's 
and all multiunit PMR's were included in this analysis. This 
investigation yielded the following results: 

Reason for nondelivery Estimated number of PMR's 

(as indicated by post offices) Single units Muttiunits 

Refusals 380 7 

Out of business 6,560 57 

Return to sender 570 14 

Not deliverable 50,570 434 

Deceased 1 ,380 8 

Unclaimed 2,100 9 

Other 190 4 

61 ,750 533 

A substantial majority of the PMR's, then, were classified as 
not deliverable, usually as a result of incorrect or insufficient 
addresses. Further analysis of the single-unit PMR's indicated 
that an estimated 93 percent were for firms with fewer than 10 
employees (or which were not classified by number of em- 
ployees) and that 93 percent of these were for companies 
included in the census of business. 

Processing returned questionnaires— After envelopes were 
opened, enclosures removed, and extraneous materials (such as 
instruction booklets) discarded, the contents were divided into 
multiunit and single-unit company returns and processed 
separately. 

The contents of mailing packages returned by multiunit firms 
were assembled in folios to insure that the items would remain 
together throughout check-in processing. Any correspondence 
or NC-X2 forms (listings of additional establishments) were 
stapled to the front page of the questionnaire, and question- 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



35 



naires with correspondence were separated. Multiunit returns 
were then sorted into four categories: Annual Survey of 
Manufactures (ASM) multiunit companies with correspondence, 
non-ASM multiunit companies with correspondence, ASM 
multiunit companies without correspondence, and non-ASM 
multiunit companies without correspondence. Questionnaires 
indicating that an establishment's physical location had changed 
or that the mailing address differed from physical location had 
to be sent for physical location punching; a form to be used for 
punching the physical location was placed at the front of the 
folder. 

Returns from single-unit companies were separated by 
census— census of manufactures (further divided into firms in 
the ASM panel and non-ASM manufacturing companies), census 
of mineral industries, census of business, and census of construc- 
tion industries. Returns in each of these categories were then 
subdivided into those with or without correspondence and 
sorted to determine which forms required physical location 
punch. Every category (for example, non-ASM, manufacturing, 
with correspondence, without physical location change) was 
separated and transmitted to check-in punch. For control 
purposes, daily counts of each category were maintained. 

Correspondence 

Approximately 295,000 letters were generated directly or 
indirectly by the initial mailout and followup mailings in the 
1967 Economic Censuses, compared to about 375,000 in the 
1963 censuses. Rigid control procedures were used to insure 
that correspondence was answered as promptly and accurately 
as possible, preferably not later than 10 to 15 days after receipt 
of the inquiry. Form letters were used in most cases, resulting in 
a reduction in professional staff time devoted to answering cor- 
respondence and possible improvement in the Bureau's public 
image because inquiries were usually answered expeditiously. 

A daily record of receipts and transmittals was maintained in 
the correspondence record log used by the units (reading, as- 
sembly, typing, and verification) assigned to handle cor- 
respondence in Jeffersonville. Priorities were assigned to cor- 
respondence by date of receipt, type of letter, and size of 
company. 

Maintenance of the correspondence check-in system— Effective 
processing of correspondence required maintenance of the 
check-in system. Special types of resolved correspondence had 
to be recycled through check-in punch operations; this was 
necessary to insure that any changes in a company's followup 
status would be reflected in the various followup programs. The 
following are examples of check-in punch recycle cases: 

1. Letters from companies requesting an extension of the 
reporting deadline, when the extension was approved 

2. Correspondence which resulted in mailing other copies of 
the questionnaires 

3. Replies indicating that a company's reporting require- 
ments were "satisfied" (for example, when the company 
was informed that it had adequate reasons for not filing a 
report and would not be required to do so) 

4. Form letters or "tailored" letters (which contained "form 
paragraphs") sent in reply to the respondent's original 
letter 

5. Blank questionnaires returned by a company, PMR's, or 
correspondence on which an analyst had written an 
instruction to "impute" 



6. Correspondence which resulted in adding an establishment 
to the address list, requiring the initiation of a form EC-76 
(see "Check-in correction form, EC-76," p. 33.) 

Any company that wrote to the Census Bureau concerning 
its 1967 Economic Censuses reporting requirements was auto- 
matically excluded from some of the followups (depending on 
when the letter was received); this allowed time for cor- 
respondence clerks and census analysts to read the letter and 
prepare an adequate reply, and avoided sending the company a 
reminder notice before it received a reply to its letter. 

Processing correspondence— Three correspondence units were in 
operation in Jeffersonville. A "special handling subunit" 
processed special cases (such as requests for extensions of 
reporting deadlines and claims that questionnaires had been 
completed and returned). A "multiunit control section" and a 
"single-unit control section" handled correspondence in their 
respective categories. 

Reading units screened and sorted correspondence on the 
basis of actions required to answer it. Letters that could be 
answered by standard procedures, using form letters, were 
referred to an assembly subunit, where the appropriate 
envelopes, form letters, questionnaires, and other enclosures 
were assembled and placed, along with the incoming letter, in a 
"transient" folder. The folders were sent to a typing and ad- 
dressing unit where clerks annotated the letters with form 
numbers of enclosures and census file numbers and typed the 
establishment names and addresses on the letters and mailing 
envelopes. Transient folders were then forwarded to a verifica- 
tion subunit, where the enclosures were placed in the envelopes 
and mailed. 

Correspondence which could not be resolved either by the 
special handling subunit or under standard procedures was 
referred to census analysts for determination of proper action. 
Outgoing letters which might change a company's status in the 
followup were also referred to analysts for determination of 
new action codes. 

The correspondence clerks were able to resolve an increasing 
number of problems as they gained experience. However, only 
the analysts had access to research files necessary to resolve 
many complicated cases, and only they were authorized to 
contact companies for more information. Those problems which 
could not be solved in Jeffersonville were referred to subject- 
matter specialists at Bureau headquarters. 

The correspondence workload reached its peak during the 
10-week period from May 17 through July 26, 1968. A weekly 
average of about 17,000 pieces of correspondence was received 
during this period, and backlogs averaged approximately 
27,000. However, the peak backlog of about 50,000 pieces of 
correspondence in the 1967 censuses was considerably less than 
the 64,000 backlog reached at one point in the 1963 censuses. 

Verification procedures— Controls were initiated to insure that 
respondents received appropriate and correct replies to their 
letters. For each person assigned to answer correspondence, 
replies were verified until 20 consecutive replies (form letters, 
tailored letters, etc.) were found to be both appropriate and 
correct. The next reply was then verified, and every fifth there- 
after. If, in the course of the verification, a reply was found to 
be incorrect, incomplete, or inadequate, the next 20 replies 
were checked. The entire operation was verified on a 
100-percent basis upon completion of the typing and the final 
assembly of mailing packages. This verification consisted of 



36 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



locating, recording, and correcting such errors as illegible labels, 
census file numbers on labels not matching numbers on en- 
closures, and incomplete or duplicated contents of envelopes. 

Check-in Punching 

Beginning in late February 1968, approximately 2 million docu- 
ments (questionnaires, correspondence, EC-76 correction forms, 



and PMR's) were forwarded to the check-in punch unit. Data 
from check-in punchcards were transmitted to Bureau head- 
quarters for maintenance of a computerized record of each 
firm's check-in status (e.g., if it had filed a completed question- 
naire, or if some other correction of its records was required). 
Check-in punching began on March 1, and check-in and physical 
location information from each source document was punched 
onto a check-in punch card, using the following format: 



Format of Check-in Punchcard 



Card 
type 


Act. 
code 




Ck. 


Yes- 
no 


County 


Sort 
code 


Date of 
action 


















Punch Card Columns 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


g 


10 


11 


12 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 



A source document could require the punching of as many as 
five types of cards. Card type 1 was the general check-in card; 
card types 2, 3, and 4 were correction cards punched from 
EC-76 forms, and card type 5 was punched for a physical loca- 
tion change. Punchcards contained space for punching the 
various sort codes and action codes and the census file number 
for each document. (Check digits were verified but not 
punched.) For questionnaires, a physical location code was 
punched to indicate whether or not the establishment was 
physically located at the place specified on its label, and the 
first seven letters of the county in which it was located were 
entered. 

All cards were verified after preliminary punching. If the 
census file number check digit failed verification, the document 
was pulled from the file, attached to the punchcard, and 
forwarded to an "alpha research unit" for corrections. Other 
rejections (such as an omission on the source document, a 
missing check digit, or two census file numbers on a document 
with no indication of which was correct) were corrected in a 
"receipt and control unit." The operations were 100-percent 
verified to eliminate errors in card type, action code, check-in 
sort code, and date of action. 

Physical location punch— About 30 percent of the 2.2 million 
establishment addresses apparently required changes in physical 
location information. A card was punched for each question- 
naire or other document that indicated a change in physical 
location. After these punchcards were 100-percent verified, the 
information was transcribed to computer magnetic tape, and the 
source documents were returned to screening units for further 
processing. (The Census Bureau's Statistical Research Division 
later conducted a study of a sample of 550 retail and service 
questionnaires on which the respondents had filled in the 
physical location inquiry. This analysis revealed that despite the 



instructions on the questionnaires to answer the physical loca- 
tion inquiries only if the physical location was different from 
the mailing address, in about 50 percent of the cases, the 
respondents reported a physical location which was the same as 
the mailing address. This indicates that about half the work- 
load, 30 percent of total establishments, was needlessly punched 
since there was no screening of the physical location informa- 
tion reported against the mailing address. It would have been 
necessary to punch the physical location information only if it 
were different from the mailing address.) 

Check-in mechanical edit— All check-in cards were edited on the 
Census 492 machine before check-in information was trans- 
mitted to Bureau headquarters for input to the computer. The 
Census 492 checked every character punched for transmission, 
searching for impossible characters and insuring that all charac- 
ters could be read by the transmission equipment. 1 This editing 
operation was accomplished during the period from April to 
October 1968; a total of 26,962 folders and 2,51 1,772 punch- 
cards were edited. Rejections totaled 2,357 folders (8.1 percent) 
and 16,046 cards (0.6 percent). 

Card-to-Tape Operations 

Data from completed work units were transmitted from a 
punchcard reader in Jeffersonville to a magnetic tape terminal at 
Bureau headquarters. (See "Data Transmission," chapter 1, p. 
10.) When an entire work unit had been transmitted, the 
Jeffersonville operator listed the punchcard control count 
(minus 5, to deduct the count of five extra transmission cards) 



'The prototype machine (Census 491 machine) was developed by 
Census Bureau engineers and technicians to expedite transmission of data 
in the 1963 Economic Censuses. The prototype was refined and 
improved for the 1967 censuses and was redesignated the Census 492 
machine. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



37 



on a work unit control sheet. He then transmitted this count to 
the headquarters operator and retained the control sheet in a 
"suspense" status pending verification of the card count. Data 
transmitted to Bureau headquarters were initially recorded on 
IBM magnetic tape, which was later converted to UNIVAC tape 
by an IBM 1401 computer equipped with a UNIVAC tape 
conversion mechanism. The data could then be processed on the 
Bureau's UNIVAC computers. 

Closeout to Punch 

Check-in and physical location punching were discontinued on 
November 4, 1968. All questionnaires received after that date 
were processed as "late receipts" and forwarded to appropriate 
subject-matter analysts for determination of whether or not the 
data would be used. 

Followup of Delinquent Respondents 

Questionnaires used in the 1967 censuses carried the con- 
spicuous notation, "Due Date: April 30, 1968." This deadline 
had to be extended for questionnaires mailed on or after April 
23; a rubber stamp was used to stamp the notation, "Due Date 
Extended to May 20, 1 968" on the face of the questionnaire or 
on the outgoing cover envelope. The Census Bureau's experience 
in previous censuses, however, indicated that many companies 
would not meet the deadlines, and six followup mailings were 
scheduled to remind delinquent companies of their legal report- 
ing obligation. 

Computers and high-speed printers were used extensively to 
identify nonrespondents and to prepare reminder notices. 
Check-in information on computer magnetic tape was matched 
against a master file of establishment addresses, and failure to 
match this master file generated labels for the reminder cor- 
respondence. Action codes assigned to receipts as they were 
checked in were the basis on which the computer identified 
nonrespondents for the followups. (See "Action codes," p. 33.) 
For example, if a company had requested and been granted an 
extension of the reporting deadline, the action code assigned to 
this respondent (action code 4, 5, or 6, depending on when the 
extension was granted) would indicate to the computer that this 
firm should be excluded from the first followup. 

The "cutoff" dates for the six followups were May 8, May 
28, June 18, July 9, August 6, and October 4, 1968. Companies 
whose questionnaires had not been checked in by these dates 
were mailed reminder notices. The following table shows the 
number and percent of multiunit and single-unit respondents 
and delinquents at the time of each followup. 



speed printers. Since the equipment was located at Census 
Bureau headquarters, check-in information was transmitted 
from Jeffersonville, where the questionnaires were received, to 
Bureau headquarters, where the cards were addressed and 
mailed. 

Form letters were used for the second and subsequent 
followups. Check-in information was transmitted from 
Jeffersonville to Bureau headquarters, just as in the first follow- 
up, but when the control file had been updated and address 
labels printed on the high-speed printers, the labels and control 
listings were sent to Jeffersonville, where the followup mailing 
packages were prepared and mailed. 

The wording of the second, third, and fourth followup letters 
was progressively stronger, and the fifth followup was a certified 
letter constituting the "prescribed official notice required by 
law" that the company was subject to legal action for failure to 
report. The sixth followup letter warned that the case would 
have to be referred for appropriate legal action if a completed 
census questionnaire was not received. 

Multiunit companies that had reported for some but not all 
of their establishments were referred to as "partially delin- 
quent." After the first followup, a computer print-out list of 
unreported establishments was sent to each partially delinquent 
multiunit firm, accompanied by a special reminder letter. 

Procedures were designed for special situations encountered 
in the followups. For example, a special form letter was 
prepared for companies which claimed to have filed reports but 
for which the Census Bureau had no record of having received 
the completed questionnaires. This letter informed the 
companies of the situation and asked them to complete and 
return another set of questionnaires, which was enclosed in the 
mailing package. After a review by census analysts, some 
companies in this category (those with fewer than 100 em- 
ployees) were excluded from the followup mailing, and data for 
them were imputed. At the discretion of census analysts, in- 
formation for other companies claiming that they had filed 
returns was obtained by telephone or telegram. Totally delin- 
quent multiunit firms with 500 or more employees were also 
followed up by telephone. 

After the final closeout of mail receipts in November 1968, 
there were approximately 158,000 delinquents, including 
116,000 single-unit firms and 42,000 establishments of multi- 
unit firms. Thus, about 93 percent of the single units and 93 
percent of the establishments of multiunit firms had satisfied 
reporting requirements, compared to 87 percent of the single 
units and 94 percent of the establishments of multiunit 
companies in the 1 963 censuses. 



Followup 


Respondents 
(in thousands) 1 


Delinquents 
(in thousands) 1 




Single units 


Multiunits 


Single units 


Multiunits 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 


849 (51%) 
1,022 (62%) 
1,343 (77%) 
1,414 (83%) 
1,510 (89%) 
1,513 (93%) 


153 (36%) 
209 (48%) 
271 (60%) 
330 (74%) 
367 (83%) 
519 (93%) 


805 (49%) 
622 (38%) 
401 (23%) 
297 (17%) 
183 (11%) 
116 (7%) 


273 (64%) 
223 (52%) 
177 (40%) 
119 (26%) 
78 (17%) 
42 (7%) 



1 Different totals of single units or multiunits reflect additions or 
deletions made as information was obtained during the course of the 
work. 



Postcards were used for the first followup. The operations 
were accomplished almost entirely by the computers and high- 



COLLECTING DATA FROM ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS 

As previously mentioned, the Census Bureau worked in close 
cooperation with the IRS and SSA to obtain from these 
agencies' administrative records information on El numbers, 
geographic location, employment, payroll, and value of sales or 
receipts for establishments not required to complete census 
questionnaires. (See "Planning the Use of Data From Adminis- 
trative Records," chapter 2, p. 12.) The basic records from 
which this information was extracted included the following: 

IRS form 941 (Employer's Quarterly Tax Return) 

IRS form 1040C (Sole Proprietorship Income Tax Return) 

IRS form 1065 (Partnership Income Tax Return) 

IRS form 1120 (Corporation Income Tax Return) 

IRS form 1120S (Small Corporation Income Tax Return) 



38 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



IRS was able to provide on computer magnetic tape the data 
from approximately 17.6 million forms 941 ; 6.3 million 1040C 
forms; and 1.6 million 1120 forms. IRSforms 1065 and 1120S, 
however, were not available on computer tape and had to be 
microfilmed at IRS Service Centers. 

During pretabulation operations, the data received on tape 
had to be converted for use on the Census Bureau's UN I VAC 
computers. In order to produce establishment records that 
contained geographic and industry or kind-of-business codes and 
data items acceptable for census use, several other steps had to 
be performed. In the conversion to UN I VAC format, the Bureau 
expanded the level of IRS and SSA industry and kind-of- 
business coding and identified cases where physical location of 
an establishment differed from its mailing address. During the 
conversion process, it was also essential to (1) determine if the 
establishment was adequately identified and if geographic and 
industry or kind-of-business codes and data items were given, 
(2) replace unacceptable geographic and industry or kind-of- 
business codes (those which did not provide adequate identifica- 
tion) and assign subindustry codes where necessary, and (3) 
adjust or reject the record when data were inconsistent. 

All forms 1065 and 1120S processed by IRS between 
January 1 and July 31, 1968, were microfilmed at the seven IRS 
service centers, which received these forms from the IRS district 
offices. Permanent or temporary IRS employees were used in 
this operation, and the Census Bureau reimbursed IRS for its 
expenses. 

The cameras used in this microfilming operation were 
installed at the service centers, and all cameras were thoroughly 
tested before microfilming of tax returns was allowed to begin. 
In addition, technicians were available at the service centers 
throughout the operation to train microfilm camera operators 
and to provide necessary advice and guidance. 

Items to be photographed for census use included the first 
page of the 1065 form and the first and third pages of the 
1120S form. If a substitute (such as a typed page with tax 
information) had been submitted in lieu of a tax form, all pages 
of the substitute were photographed. If a blank or incomplete 
return was submitted with attachments, the first page of the 
form and all attachments were photographed. For census 
purposes, a 1065 return was considered complete if it contained 
entries for the questions on "principle business activity," 
"county in which located," "date commenced business," and 
"net receipts," or if this information could be obtained from 
attachments. If the net receipts question was not answered, the 
report was accepted for microfilming if the questions on "cost 
of goods sold" and "gross profit" were answered. If none of 
these three questions was answered, an attempt was made to 
determine the establishment's net receipts using any attach- 
ments sent with the tax return. An 1120Sform was considered 
complete for census purposes if the questions on El number and 
net receipts were answered, or if these questions could be 
answered on the basis of data reported in attachments. 



Each reel of microfilm was inspected immediately after it 
had been developed. The first and last exposures on each reel 
were inspected, after which the inspector selected and examined 
a random sample of the remaining exposures. Rejected reels 
were refilmed. Accepted reels were forwarded to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Division, where receipts were checked 
and logged in. In total, 880,500 of the 1065 returns and 
141,300 forms 1120S were microfilmed. 

Beginning in July 1968, microfilmed information was 
punched on punchcards in Jeffersonville and at the Census 
Bureau's Personal Census Service Branch in Pittsburg, Kans., 
where the necessary equipment and personnel were available. 
When the cards had been punched verified, and edited by a 
Census 492 machine, data from them were transmitted to 
Census Bureau headquarters via the Bureau's data transmission 
system. 

The greatly increased use of administrative records in the 
1967 censuses required the development of new and expanded 
procedures, and, as was expected in an operation involving more 
than 26 million income tax returns, some readjustments were 
required during the course of the data collection phase. For 
example, Census Bureau data processing personnel inadvertently 
"blanked" (erased) a segment of computer tape containing data 
from about 900,000 IRS forms 941 and 15,000 IRS forms 
1120. Considerable time and effort was required to reassemble 
data for the blanked records. 

Because of delays in receiving tax returns from the IRS 
District Offices, two service centers were behind schedule in 
microfilming the 1065 and 1120S returns, and the final IRS 
tape files of forms 941 , 1 040C, and 1 1 20 were delivered to the 
Census Bureau about 3 months later than expected. 

Some difficulty was encountered in punching data on 
punchcards at the Census Bureau's Pittsburg office and trans- 
mitting it to Bureau headquarters. The initial work units trans- 
mitted from Pittsburg were found to be lacking data from 
almost half the records; the missing data were apparently 
dropped during card-to-tape transmission. The punchcards for 
these work units were forwarded to Jeffersonville, and the data 
were retransmitted from there without difficulty. In addition, 
data from about 100,000 records had to be repunched in 
Pittsburg because record counts at Bureau headquarters and 
card counts in Pittsburg did not agree, indicating that some 
information had been lost in transmission. 

Overall, it appeared that many of these problems resulted 
from the Census Bureau's lack of complete familiarity with all 
of the details of the numerous IRS tape files, and IRS's less- 
than-full understanding of the Census Bureau's specific data 
requirements and time schedules. After the experience gained in 
the 1967 censuses, the Bureau expected that the data processing 
of the next census, for 1972, could be conducted more rapidly 
than ever before, in large part because of the development of 
efficient procedures for collecting census information from 
administrative records. 



CHAPTER 



7 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries 

DATA PROCESSING 



Processing data for the approximately 5 million establishments 
included in the 1967 Economic Censuses was a challenging and 
complicated job for both men and computers. All of the 
subject-matter divisions directly concerned with the subject 
content of the censuses, as well as the data processing divisions 
responsible for planning and implementing the actual tabulation 
of the statistics, had to coordinate their efforts: the skills of the 
subject-matter specialists in analyzing statistics in their 
respective disciplines had to be blended successfully with the 
expertise of the systems analysts, programers, and other 
computer specialists, to process mass data. This combination of 
subject-matter and data-processing expertise was vital in bring- 
ing together data from two different sources— census question- 
naires and administrative records of other agencies— to produce 
accurate and useful tabulations. 



PRELIMINARY PROCESSING OF DATA FROM 
CENSUS QUESTIONNAIRES 

As previously mentioned, census questionnaires were returned 
by respondents to the Jeffersonville Census Operations 
Division. 1 There, a clercial work force, varying from 100 to 450 
employees, accomplished most non-computer (or clerical) 
processing operations. In general, these operations included 
screening and editing questionnaires and contacting respondents 
to improve reported information by correcting omissions and 
adjusting obvious contradictions, wherever possible. Data from 
questionnaires were then transferred to punchcards and 
transmitted to Census Bureau headquarters for computer 
processing. 



Initial Processing of Questionnaires 
From Multiunit Companies 

Preliminary screening— After initial check-in operations had 
been completed, questionnaires returned by multiunit 
companies were sent to a preliminary screening unit. In this 
unit, clerks made notations of a few specific problems such as 
completely blank questionnaires; remarks on questionnaires; 
letters attached to questionnaires; reports of changes in 
company affiliation, structure, or organization; and listings of 
additional establishments in activities covered by the censuses. 



These would be resolved during subsequent multiunit coverage 
review. 

Problems observed during this preliminary review were noted 
by checking the appropriate box on a "referral" sheet (that is, 
the problems were referred elsewhere for handling). 2 Multiunit 
packages returned with completely blank questionnaires, 
remarks written on questionnaires, or correspondence attached 
to questionnaires received further clerical review to determine 
how each case should be handled. For example, if a company 
had returned one or more blank questionnaires, the clerk sent 
another copy of the questionnaire (and the appropriate form 
letter) to the company. When the appropriate action had been 
taken regarding this class of problems, the returned question- 
naires, including multiunit packages with problems other than 
blank questionnaires, remarks, and attached correspondence, 
were sent on a flow basis to the unit responsible for performing 
the multiunit coverage checks. 

Multiunit coverage— Multiunit coverage procedures were 
designed to assure complete but unduplicated census reporting 
by establishments of multiunit companies; that is, each estab- 
lishment should be enumerated once, but only once. These 
procedures also provided consistent, centralized handling of 
company-reported changes in affiliation. The multiunit coverage 
unit, located in Jeffersonville, was established primarily to 
handle cases involving specific coverage problems identified dur- 
ing preliminary screening operations. However, all question- 
naries returned by establishments of multiunit companies were 
reviewed. Specific coverage procedures were developed by the 
Census Common Questions Coordinating Committee (see "Plan- 
ning Committee," chapter 1, p. 8), which had overall responsi- 
bility for planning the various company-related aspects of 
census operations. 



1 The Jeffersonville facility was established at a deactivated U.S. Army 
depot in 1958 for the specific purpose of processing data from the 1958 
Economic Censuses. It has had three major advantages: (1 ) Location away 
from crowded Washington, (2) availability of quickly expandable space 
suitable for quick staff buildups and cutbacks, and (3) availability of 
high-quality personnel willing to work on a temporary intermittent basis. 



2 Three major referral units were established to provide for profes- 
sional review and resolution of problems: 

A. The Directory Unit in Jeffersonville judged the validity of 
"splitters" (new multiunits), obtained census file numbers from Census 
Bureau headquarters for valid splitters, assigned plant numbers, and re- 
searched various problem referrals. 

B. The Central Directory Unit at Bureau headquarters coordi- 
nated and controlled all census directory work, supplied census file 
numbers to the Jeffersonville Directory Unit, and maintained a control 
file of splitters, mergers, and company affiliation changes. 

C. The Company Review Task Force at Bureau headquarters 
reviewed complicated coverage problems involving complex multiunit 
companies and provided technical direction to the Central Directory 
Unit. This task force, established at the recommendation of the Census 
Common Questions Coordinating Committee and composed of highly 
experienced analysts, was in operation for approximately 3 months 
during the peak processing period. 



39 



40 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



In the coverage review unit, various check-in and control files 
were used to check off establishments of each multiunit 
company as their questionnaires were received. Then, clerks 
conducted coverage review operations, using a series of 
"decision tables." These tables presented logical alternative 
courses of action which would be appropriate under various 
combinations of conditions. With these tables, clerks could 
process about 95 percent of the coverage problems. Other 
problems were referred to specially trained multiunit coverage 
analysts, who either resolved them or referred them to the 
Company Review Task Force at Bureau headquarters. 

Of major importance in checking multiunit coverage was an 
Administrative Records Data Listing (ARDL), which had been 
prepared for each company. The ARDL listed, by employer 
identification (El) number, the name and address of each 
company and subsidiaries with other El numbers, along with the 
corresponding company payroll data available from the various 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social Security Administra- 
tion (SSA) administrative records. 

In checking coverage, clerks extracted data from question- 
naires for each establishment of a multiunit company. March 
employment and annual payroll figures were then extracted and 
totaled, and the totals were matched with corresponding totals 
reported by the company on its form NC-K1 (Company 
Summary Report). Significant differences indicated that there 
were possible coverage problems which should be investigated 
by an analyst. 

Special coverage control procedures were used in checking 
forms NC-X2 (Listing of Additional Establishments). When a 
company returned its NC-X2 questionnaire with one or more 
new establishments listed, clerks carefully reviewed the firm's 
company summary report (which listed all establishments) to be 
certain that the establishment was really new. If so, the ap- 
propriate census questionnaires were mailed to the new 
establishment, and it was added to the company's establishment 
listing. 

Many census questionnaires indicated El number changes 
that had to be verified to assure complete and unduplicated 
establishment reporting. For example, when companies merged 
or when a company acquired a new plant or business location 
(with associated El numbers), the Census Bureau files had to be 
updated to reflect this change. 

Multiunit coverage operations were carefully verified in a 
quality control section. Each multiunit company folder was 
checked for general completeness, and for verification that 
company affiliation changes had been properly made and 
documented. When the establishment questionnaires "cleared" 
quality control, they were sorted by "census" (business, 
manufactures, mineral industries, and construction) and by 
questionnaire form number within census. They were then 
ready to be sent on to the next stage in the clerical processing 
cycle. 

Overall, the multiunit coverage unit processed more than 
400,000 establishment questionnaires. As is inevitable in a job 
of this scope, magnitude, and complexity, operations did not 
always run as smoothly as planned. The coverage control 
problems were typical of those confronted in other phases of 
the processing operation and are probably representative of 
types of problems encountered in any large data-processing 
operation involving extensive clerical review, problem referrals, 
close cooperation between clerks and professional personnel, 
and application of detailed written and oral instructions. For 
example, some clerks and analysts complained that completing 



the various internal-use control forms (such as problem 
identification sheets and referral work sheets) was more time- 
consuming than resolving the coverage problems. In addition, 
clerks sometimes referred to analysts many cases that could 
have been resolved through proper application of the clerical 
review procedures. There was also some evidence of breakdowns 
in communications between clerks and analysts; some analysts 
(many of whom were new employees with relatively little 
census experience) apparently did not make their instructions to 
clerks sufficiently complete or specific. 



Preliminary Screening of Questionnaires 
From Single-unit Companies 

After initial check-in operations had been completed, question- 
naires returned by single-unit firms were screened for company 
affiliation. Any indication of affiliation with another company 
was reviewed by analysts, who determined whether or not the 
parent company or subsidiary involved was a multiunit. Multi- 
units were referred to the multiunit coverage unit. 

This preliminary screening also uncovered some single-unit 
questionnaires reporting more than one business location. These 
questionnaires (referred to as "splitters") were sent to the 
special splitter classification unit, which determined whether or 
not the company should be processed as a multiunit. 



PRE-EDIT SORT, DETAILED SCREENING, 
AND EDITING 

After preliminary screening for both single-unit and multiunit 
companies had been accomplished, all questionnaires were 
sorted into seven broad categories: retail, wholesale, selected 
services, manufacturing, mineral industries, construction, and 
general questionnaires. The questionnaires were then ready for 
detailed prepunch screening and editing. 

The primary purpose of the clerical screening and editing 
operations was to determine (1) which questionnaires were 
ready to have data punched on punchcards, (2) which had 
relatively minor problems that could be resolved in Jefferson- 
ville, by application of available procedures or correspondence, 
and (3) which would have to be referred to Census Bureau 
headquarters. In the screening operation, clerks verified that all 
entries on questionnaires were legible, and performed some 
standard clerical operations (such as rounding dollar figures to 
thousands of dollars, eliminating brackets, and inserting codes). 
Editing was accomplished by clerks using various "screening 
guides." These guides provided editing specifications, such as 
which data items should be screened, what was considered 
minimum acceptable data, and where to refer questionnaires 
with problems that the clerks could not resolve for both 
"general" and "specific" editing. "General editing" consisted of 
a series of basic checks (such as determining that respondent's 
remarks or correspondence had been reviewed and resolved). 
"Specific editing" involved a detailed review of the minimum 
data required for a report to be considered complete. 

For both the general edit and the specific edit, problems 
were noted on appropriate referral slips for analysts' use. The 
work of the editors was verified, not only during the training 
period (a 10-percent random sample of a 200-questionnaire 
work unit), but also after they had qualified as editors (a 
5-percent random sample of all work). A quality control unit 
maintained individual records for each editor, and weekly sum- 
mary reports were submitted to Census Bureau headquarters. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



41 



INDUSTRY/KIND-OF-BUSINESS CODING 

To produce the various classifications of data for economic 
census publications, the Bureau assigned each in-scope establish- 
ment an industry /kind-of-business code. This code indicated the 
establishment's principal economic activity or product, and was 
usually assigned during computer operations. The computers 
were programed to assign these codes after checking both in- 
formation reported by the respondent (such as the "self- 
designation" code checked by the respondent to describe his 
business, commodity-line and merchandise-line information, 
value of shipments or receipts, etc.), and other available in- 
formation (such as historic establishment classifications). 

Although most coding was done by computer, some coding 
had to be done by clerks during precomputer processing of 
questionnaires at Jeffersonville. For example, in answering the 
questions on kind of business, products and services, or 
merchandise lines, many respondents altered the preprinted 
categories, or wrote in additional entries. In addition, the 
general questionnaires (see "Census Questionnaires," chapter 5, 
p. 25) required coding because the Census Bureau lacked 
industry/kind-of-business information for some reported 
establishments. Clerks also coded cases rejected as uncodable 
during computer processing. 



Clerks assigned codes by using various specifications and 
manuals (such as the "1967 Economic Censuses Industry and 
Product Classification Manual") and information on the 
questionnaires (such as the respondent's written description of 
the kind of business). If the clerk could not determine a code, 
he referred the questionnaire to an analyst, who attempted to 
resolve the problem by reviewing available information; if 
necessary, he contacted the respondent. 

Some establishments were discovered to have been mis- 
classified in a census category (for example, a retail establish- 
ment misclassified as a wholesale establishment). Analysts with 
expertise in the various subject-matter specialties (business, 
industry, and construction) worked together to reach a decision 
on the proper classification and disposition of questionable 
cases. If no agreement could be reached, the questionnaire was 
sent to industry and commodity classification specialists at 
Census Bureau headquarters. 

POST-EDIT CORRESPONDENCE 

During the various editing and review operations, clerks en- 
countered numerous problems which could best be resolved by 
contacting respondents. These problems (such as missing data, 
obviously erroneous or inconsistent entries, or unusual organiza- 



FIGURE 5. Data Card Punching at the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division. Data Reported on 1967 Economic Censuses Questionnaires Were 
Punched on Approximately 17.5 Million Punchcards. 




42 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



tion alignments) were usually limited to a few items which 
occurred frequently. In such cases, form letters could often be 
used. Therefore, the Bureau prepared a variety of form letters 
and provided clerks with guidelines for selecting the appropriate 
letter to fit the situation. If a clerk could not find an ap- 
propriate letter, or if the problem was so complicated that 
several letters would be required, the case was referred to a 
supervisor for a decision on whether it could be handled 
routinely or would have to be referred to an analyst for re- 
solution by "tailored" letter or telephone. 

A followup file was maintained for those cases requiring 
replies; reminder letters were mailed to companies which failed 
to respond. If the original request and two reminders did not 
elicit a response, the case was referred to an analyst. The analyst 
decided whether he should contact the company by telephone, 
or resolve the case otherwise. 



DATA CARD PUNCHING 

After questionnaires had been processed through these pre- 
punch screening operations, they were packaged in folios 



containing about 100 questionnaires with similar characteristics 
and were forwarded to a punch unit. In this unit, the reported 
data were transferred to punchcards. Virtually all of the card 
punching, which involved approximately 17.5 million punch- 
cards, was accomplished at the Jeffersonville Census Operations 
Division. Different types of punchcards were used for each of 
the censuses and subprojects within censuses. Systems analysts 
specified the types of cards required to extract the information 
needed for the various tabulations. At least one card (but 
usually more) was punched for each questionnaire, and every 
card included the firm's census file number. 

Three different types of data were punched-stub data (in- 
formation to classify figures presented on the same horizontal 
line on a statistical table, such as "total department store 
sales"), quantitative data, and miscellaneous codes (such as 
product or SIC codes). Keypunch operators could ascertain how 
to punch a particular data item by looking at the "key" nota- 
tion printed next to the item on the questionnaire. The key 
consisted of a boldface character designating the card type, 
followed by a light-faced number designating the section on the 
card to be punched. 



Example of a Key Notation 



a. TOTAL SALES for purchases and 
other operation receipts 


Dollars 


Cents 


Key 




XX 


X4 



To facilitate punching, the keypunch operator could select 
any of three card format (prearranged) programs. These pro- 
grams covered the variety of card types required for basic data 
punching and allowed continuous punching of all data for a 
questionnaire. By using a card format program, the operator 
could punch all cards required for a particular questionnaire 
without stopping to get another set of punching instructions. 
There were 26 card types for business firms, 12 card types for 
manufacturing establishments, 11 card types for mineral 
industries firms, and six card types for general questionnaires. 

Punching of selected information (such as company's census 
file number) was confirmed by use of a "check digit" as the last 
digit of the code. The machine independently computed a check 
digit punched by the operator, and if the digits were not 
identical, the machine "locked" to signal that there was an 
error. 

The work of the keypunch operators was carefully verified. 
All cards were 100-percent verified for trainees, a 10-percent 
sample was verified for newly-trained operators attempting to 
achieve qualification standards, and a 3-percent sample was 
verified for qualified operators. Errors detected during any of 
the quality control checks were corrected immediately, and 
operators who could not meet minimum standards were 
retrained or reassigned to other work. These stringent control 
and verification procedures for the card punching operations 
were instrumental in maintaining the overall error rate at less 
than 2 percent. 



DATA TRANSMISSION AND DISPOSITION 
OF QUESTIONNAIRES 

Data punched at Jeffersonville were transmitted to the process- 
ing installation at Census Bureau headquarters on the high-speed 
data transmission system. (See "Data Transmission," chapter 1, 
p. 10.) The system was self-checking; it accepted each card only 
if the preceding card had been "read" satisfactorily. Trouble at 
either terminal stopped transmission automatically. Also, the 
operator at either end could stop it manually and use the tele- 
phone to communicate orally. The census 492 machine checked 
every character punched for transmission to insure that all 
characters could be read by the equipment. (See "Check-in 
mechanical edit," chapter 6, p. 36.) 

After punching operations had been completed and data 
transmitted, the questionnaires were filed, pending receipt of 
disposition instructions from Bureau headquarters. In some 
cases, questionnaires later had to be retrieved from the files and 
recycled or examined by analysts to verify data rejected during 
computer operations. 



COMPUTER EDITING 

Computer editing is a mechanized process of screening, testing, 
and refining reported data; it essentially involves checking for 
reasonableness and internal consistency so that unusual informa- 
tion can be verified and corrected if necessary. In general, the 
computers are programed to perform certain tests and make 
comparisons involving key operating ratios (such as payroll per 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



43 



employee, and cost of materials per dollar of shipments). Key 
operating ratios were tested by comparing them against 
tolerance limits derived from the previous census or current 
surveys. Computers were programed to correct the item (for 
example, by a process of rounding, substituting a total by a sum 
of detail, or imputing on the basis of one of the several ratios in 
which the questionable component was contained) or "flag" the 
record for later inspection. 

Editing business returns— With the hundreds of kinds of 
businesses included in the 1967 Census of Business and the 
many types of questionnaires used to enumerate them, the 
computer edit programs were quite comprehensive. The 
individual computer tests and checks amounted to several 
thousand steps, only a small fraction of which were required to 
edit the report of any one establishment. 

The major elements of these computer programs were (1) 
coding the kind of business, (2) correcting, imputing, or 
rejecting unacceptable returns, (3) editing special inquiries, and 
(4) balancing the merchandise- and commodity-line entries. 

Editing manufactures and minerals returns— While most of the 
manufactures and minerals edit programs were newly devised 
for the 1967 censuses, they were based largely on similar pro- 
grams in use during the 1963 censuses. 

As in 1963, average values and tolerance limits for key 
operating ratios (for example, cost of materials per dollar of 
shipments, payroll per employee, production worker wages per 
man-hour, etc.) played a fundamental role in the editing 
process. The changes from 1963 programs involved 
"generalizing" the structure of the edits so that Annual Survey 
of Manufactures (ASM) records, for example, could be 
processed through most of the same routines as the remainder 
of census records by means of external parameter changes only. 
The number of computer edit routines was also greatly 
increased, so that the effect of an erroneous or unrealistic 
tolerance limit for a particular operating ratio was not likely to 
affect seriously the statistics for an entire industry. 

In general, the sequence of edits included: 

1. A housekeeping and screening edit, which inspected each 
record for basic processability (presence of name and 
address information and identification codes) and 
performed some obvious data manipulation, such as the 
replacement of a missing total by a corresponding sum of 
detail 

2. Coverage control and matching edits, which were a series 
of programs to match incoming establishment records 
against an historical data file 

3. A magnitude edit, which was designed to test the record 
for the scale of two key items: payroll and value of 
shipments. When edit failures were encountered, a fixed 
sequence of procedures to adjust the data were attempted 
(such as replacing a total by a sum of detail) based on 
documentation of the most commonly occurring errors in 
past censuses and surveys. If these corrective procedures 
failed, the record was rejected for clerical inspection, 
correction, and recycling. 

4. A general statistics edit, which tested the previously 
discussed key operating ratios and corrected the record or 
flagged it for later analytical review if an irregularity was 
uncovered. This edit was also the vehicle for the imputa- 
tion of records designated as belonging to the administra- 
tive record portion of the universe and records of 
delinquent establishments. 



5. A product class edit, which tested product class entries on 
the ASM records. This edit played only a minor role in 
processing and correction activities. 

6. The inter-card/inter-column edits, which introduced 
logically formulated queries on specific relationships 
among products, materials, and special inquiries 

7. The "stripped" product and materials edits, which 
analyzed production-consumption relationships, apart (or 
stripped) from the complete establishment edits 

8. The duplicate removal program, which identified and 
eliminated duplicate establishment records 

PROCESSING ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS DATA 

Computers were used extensively in processing data obtained 
from IRS and SSA administrative records. In addition to the 
editing operation previously described, computers were 
employed in (1) developing the administrative records control 
files, (2) assigning industry/kind-of-business codes, (3) match- 
ing, merging, and refining administrative records data for the 
nonmail universe (the small companies which were not required 
to fill questionnaires), and (4) assigning or verifying geographic 
codes. 

The administrative record control files were developed in a 
complex three-phased computer process. The first phase 
consisted of merging and refining the SSA coding file and the 
Business Master File (see "Developing the Initial Control File," 
chapter 3, p. 20). The second phase involved selecting, from 
the merged file, the "small" employers for which data would be 
collected from administrative records. Basically, this included all 
single-unit firms with payroll below a specified cutoff. However, 
a 10-percent sample of small retail single units were included in 
the mail universe. In the third phase, retail and service non- 
employers were identified. Census information for these was 
obtained from 1967 income tax records. (As previously 
mentioned, nonemployers in manufactures, mineral industries, 
and wholesale trade were not included in the censuses.) 

Establishments for which census data were obtained from 
administrative records also had to be assigned industry/kind-of- 
business codes; their data could then be appropriately combined 
with data from firms in the mail universe. (See "Industry/Kind- 
Of-Business Coding," p. 41, for a description of the coding 
process). 

The third computer processing operation, basically a 
matching/refining operation, involved running a series of 
computer programs to match administrative records data with 
the in-scope nonemployers and small employers in the nonmail 
control file, remove duplicates, impute data for nonrespondents, 
assign or revise geographic codes, and divide the file by major 
census. 



MERGING ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS AND 
QUESTIONNAIRE DATA 

Data extracted from administrative records data and informa- 
tion reported on census questionnaires were managed separately 
through the various stages of processing the 1967 censuses. 
When the processing operations were completed in early 1969, 
the two files were merged, via the computer, to create a data file 
from which various tabulations and listings were prepared as 
needed for publication of census results. (See Chapter 10, 
"Publicity and the Publications Program.") 



44 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



DATA TABULATION AND DISCLOSURE ANALYSIS 

The actual computer tabulation of economic census data 
(including publication runs) was initiated in March 1969 for the 
business census and in July 1969 for the censuses of manu- 
factures and mineral industries. However, planning and 
preparatory work for this operation began much earlier. 
Subject-matter specialists, working in close cooperation with 
computer systems experts, prepared specifications to indicate 
what tabulations and listings they wanted, and in what format. 
The specifications were then assigned to programers, who wrote 
programs to be run on the computers for extracting the desired 
tabulations and listings from the data files. When the programs 
had been written and corrected, and coded (converting instruc- 
tions to symbolic "machine" language), production tests were 
run on the computer. The results were then analyzed by 
subject-matter specialists, who determined if the programs 



provided acceptable products, or if revisions in specifications or 
programs were required. In many cases, the final program bore 
little resemblance to the first one since it was almost inevitable 
that errors would be found during program testing. 

Programs that had been tested, reviewed, and accepted as 
yielding adequate results were used for production of the 
tabulations. Most of the statistical tables required a minimum of 
two computer operations. The first summarized the data to the 
most detailed level to be published and, in some cases, produced 
summarizations at successively higher levels. The second opera- 
tion, taking advantage of the work of the first, determined what 
detail had to be suppressed to preserve confidentiality and made 
some final computations for medians, means, or percents. 
Usually, the data tapes were initially tabulated to produce 
"advance" tabulations on an industry/kind-of-business basis. 
These were subjected to analytical review. (For manufactures 



FIGURE 6. Magnetic Tape Handling Devices. Data Transmitted to Census Bureau Headquarters From Jeffersonville Were Initially Recorded on IBM 
Magnetic Tape, Which was Later Converted to UNIVAC Tape by an IBM 1401 Computer Equipped With a UNIVAC Tape Conversion 
Mechanism. 




CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



45 



and mineral industries, selected statistics were prepared for 
advance reports.) Corrections resulting from this review were 
made to the computer records, and the more extensive final 
tabulations were produced. 

The final step in processing was translating data from 
computer magnetic tapes to printed documents, or paper copy. 
The paper copy was produced by high-speed printers which 
were auxiliaries (or "output units") of the Census Bureau's 
computer systems. The tables that came from high-speed 
printers as computer printouts were carefully reviewed in the 
subject-matter divisions. They were examined by highly trained 
and experienced specialists to ascertain if the usual statistical 
relationships were present, if the figures were reasonably 
comparable with those of previous censuses and other surveys, 
and if various tests of acceptability were met. Questionable 
figures were investigated, and, if necessary, corrective action was 
taken. The data were then ready to enter the publication 
process. (See "Publications Program," chapter 10. p. 55.) 

In accordance with the Federal laws governing census 
reports, published statistical summaries must not reveal the in- 
formation furnished by any individual respondent. Provisions 
for protecting this confidentiality were maintained throughout 
the processing of 1967 Economic Census questionnaires and 
administrative records, and all statistical tables to be published 
had to undergo thorough disclosure analysis. Computers were 
programed to examine each publication total to determine 
whether it constituted a disclosure. If so, the figure was with- 
held from publication and the computer substituted a reference 
symbol "D" in the data cell. In addition, analysts reviewed the 
decisions made by the computer. Figures were suppressed not 
only if they would, by themselves, be direct disclosures, but also 
to prevent the derivation of disclosures by subtraction. 

In deciding which figures to withhold or publish, certain 
rules were generally followed. Preference was given to geo- 
graphic divisions over individual States in applying the dis- 
closure rules. On tables showing industry detail, major 2-digit 
industry group totals were given preference over 3-digit industry 



group totals which, in turn, had preference over individual 
4-digit industries. This order of precedence was used because it 
was considered preferable to show divisional, regional, or U.S. 
data for an industry, even at the cost of withholding data for 
some (usually the least statistically significant) States. 

For purposes of census confidentiality, publishing the 
number of establishments (even one or two) in a kind of 
business was not considered a disclosure of confidential 
information, even when the data items were withheld to avoid 
disclosure. 

As anticipated, some problems were encountered in tabu- 
lating data. In some cases, the data file itself was incomplete or 
not arranged in a manner which would allow extraction of the 
tabulations and listings requested in the subject-matter 
specialists' specifications. In other cases, the programs written 
to extract data required revision. Some programs had to be 
written, tested, revised and rewritten many times, and this 
situation was complicated by the fact that some programers left 
the agency or had to be reassigned to other projects. In ad- 
dition, the sheer size and complexity of the data file made it 
almost inevitable that some computer tapes, printouts, and 
other materials would be lost or misplaced. 

Beginning in mid-1970, the final stages of processing the 
1967 Economic Censuses overlapped the initial processing stages 
of the 1970 Census of Population and Housing. This resulted in 
some difficulty in securing computer time for economic census 
work, although a leased computer facility was used, and time 
was secured on computers of other Federal agencies. As the 
time and money allocations began to run out, it became neces- 
sary to curtail or eliminate some planned projects and to 
establish strict priorities on work remaining to be done. 

Representatives of the Census Bureau's data-processing 
divisions and subject-matter divisions maintained close contact 
throughout the processing stages. The Economic Censuses 
Systems Committee (see "Planning Committees," chapter 1, p. 
8) met frequently to attempt to solve data-processing and 
systems analysis problems, remove bottlenecks, and otherwise 
expedite the work. 



CHAPTER 



8 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 
CONDUCTING THE CENSUSES IN OUTLYING AREAS 



PUERTO RICO 



Introduction 



The 1967 Puerto Rico Census of Business was the sixth such 
canvass of the Island's business activities during the century. 
The first census covered 1939, and similar censuses were 
conducted for the years 1949, 1954, 1958, 1963, and 1967. 

The 1967 Puerto Rico Census of Manufactures was the 10th 
such canvass of the Island's manufacturing activities. The first 
census covered 1909, and excepting 1929, a census was taken 
at 10-year intervals through 1949. Censuses of manufactures 
were also taken concurrently with the census of business for the 
years 1954, 1958, 1963, and 1967. In 1952 and 1956, censuses 
of manufactures with more limited coverage were conducted by 
the Commonwealth Government of Puerto Rico. 

The 1954, 1958, 1963, and 1967 censuses of business and 
manufactures were conducted jointly by the Puerto Rico Plan- 
ning Board of the Commonwealth Government of Puerto Rico 
and the Bureau of the Census. Censuses prior to 1952, were 
conducted as part of the economic censuses of the United 
States. 

In October 1958, a special agreement was concluded between 
the Bureau of the Census and the Commonwealth Government 
concerning censuses in Puerto Rico. This agreement specified 
that the Commonwealth Government would assume more 
responsibility for planning and conducting censuses, recognized 
the Government's special statistical needs, and provided for 
training in census methods and procedures for employees of its 
statistical agency. 

The 1967 Economic Censuses in Puerto Rico were 
authorized by an Act of the Congress of the United States, Title 
13, United States Code, sections 131, 191, and 224, and by an 
Act of the Legislature of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
Law Number 11, approved on March 27, 1950, which au- 
thorized the Governor to direct that manufacturing and business 
censuses be taken in the Commonwealth whenever he deemed 
them "of public advisability." 



Coverage 

The 1967 censuses covered establishments engaged in manu- 
facturing, retail and wholesale trade, services, and contract con- 

46 



struction, as described by the Standard Industrial Classification 
(SIC) Manual, in the following categories: 



Division and SIC Major Group 

Manufacturing 19 to 39 

Wholesale Trade 50 

Retail Trade 52 to 59 

Services (part): 

Hotels, motels 701 

Personal and business services 72, 73 

Repair services 75, 76 

Amusement and recreational services 78, 79 

Contract construction (part): 

General contractors 15, 16 

Special trade contractors 17 

Subdividers and developers 6551 (excluding cemeteries) 

Operative builders 6561 



The 1967 coverage was the same as for 1963 except for the 
addition of the contract construction industry. Other industries 
added to the scope of the 1967 censuses in the United States 
(travel agencies, law firms, and engineering and architecture 
firms) were not included in the Puerto Rico censuses. 



Enumeration Methods 

The 1967 Economic Censuses in Puerto Rico consisted of a 
combined mail/personal interview canvass. The mailing register 
was prepared by the same method as for the economic censuses 
in the United States, using as a base the Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS) records of companies required to file forms 941 
(Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Returns). A precanvass of 
multiunit firms similar to that conducted in the United States 
was carried out in Puerto Rico in January and February 1968. 
Approximately 1,000 companies were included in this pre- 
canvass. 

The Census Bureau again worked in close cooperation with 
the Puerto Rico Planning Board of the Commonwealth Govern- 
ment in planning and conducting the censuses. The mailout, 
receipt and check-in, and followup operations were the re- 
sponsibility of the Planning Board, although the Census Bureau 
prepared mailing labels and affixed them to the mailing pieces. 
The Planning Board had prime responsibility for the personal 
interview segment of the censuses, including preparation of 
enumerator route lists, cross-referencing route lists and mailing 
lists, hiring and training enumerators, and supervising the actual 
enumeration and followup (including visits to firms that failed 
to complete and return questionnaires sent to them in the mail 
canvass). 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



47 



In the clerical processing of returns, Planning Board clerks 
assigned geographic and SIC codes (using coding manuals 
provided by the Census Bureau), rounded figures and converted 
percentages to figures, extracted any preliminary data, and 
ultimately forwarded returns to the Jeffersonville Census 
Operations Division, where data were punched and transmitted 
to Census Bureau headquarters for computer processing. 

Spanish and English versions of census questionnaires— Although 

Spanish is the prevalent language in the Commonwealth, there 
were two versions of the census questionnaires, one printed in 
Spanish and the other in English, as both languages are official. 



Census of Manufactures— Procedures for conducting the 1967 
Census of Manufactures in Puerto Rico were basically the same 
as 1963 procedures. Questionnaires were again distributed and 
returned by mail. A separate report was required from each 
manufacturing establishment which had one or more employees 
during 1967. Most manufacturing establishments in Puerto Rico 
are operated by single-unit companies and could therefore 
satisfy reporting requirements by completing a single question- 
naire. Firms operating more than one establishment, however, 
had to submit a report for each plant location. Also, the 
relatively few companies engaged in distinctly different lines of 
activity at one location were asked to submit a separate report 
for each activity, if the company records permitted such a 
separation, and if the separate activities were substantial in size. 

A long questionnaire (form EC-PR-50) was mailed to ap- 
proximately 1,000 manufacturing establishments with 10 
employees or more. The inquiries on this questionnaire asked 
for the same level of detail on employment, payrolls, cost of 
materials, capital expenditures, and inventories as was requested 
of manufacturing firms in the United States, but the product 
questions were somewhat less detailed. 

A shorter questionnaire (form EC-PR-60) was mailed on the 
same date to about 1,500 companies with one to nine em- 
ployees. This questionnaire included inquiries only on total em- 
ployment, payrolls (without a separate tally of production 
workers), total inventories, and shipments by product class. 

On both the long and short questionnaires, there were 
inquiries on wages paid to working partners and homeworkers 
(employees who perform manufacturing operations at home 
rather than in a factory). These were included because they are 
important in the small-scale manufacturing prevalent in Puerto 
Rico. 



Census of Business— About 6,000 of the approximately 42,000 
in-scope business firms in Puerto Rico were canvassed by mail, 
and data for the remaining 36,000 were collected in personal 
interviews. The 2,000 wholesale establishments were canvassed 
entirely by mail, but a personal canvass was necessary for 
smaller establishments in the retail and service areas because 
many of the 30,000 retail and 10,000 service establishments 
have no employees and did not therefore file forms 941 with 
IRS. 

In the wholesale trade area, forms EC-PR-10 (questionnaire 
for multiunit firms), and EC-PR-11 (questionnaire for single- 
unit firms) were mailed out on April 29, 1968. These 
questionnaires closely resembled the 1963 report forms, but 



there were new questions covering warehouse, stockroom, and 
other inventory space, and requiring an analysis of sales by com- 
modity lines. 

Forms EC-PR-20 and EC-PR-21 were used in the mail canvass 
of retail establishments, the former for multiunit companies and 
the latter for single-unit firms. Form EC-PR-22 was used by the 
enumerators conducting personal interviews of the smaller retail 
establishments not covered in the mail canvass. All three 
versions of this questionnaire contained a new inquiry on 
merchandise lines but were otherwise basically the same as the 
1963 report forms. 

There were also three versions of the questionnaire for 
service establishments: form EC-PR-30 for multiunit companies 
included in the mail canvass, form EC-PR-31 for single-unit 
firms in the mail canvass, and form EC-PR-32 for use in the 
personal interviews. 

A census of construction industries similar to that in the 
United States was conducted in Puerto Rico in conjunction with 
the business census. Approximately 2,000 construction estab- 
lishments were canvassed by mail, using one type of question- 
naire, form EC-PR-99. 

Schedule of Operations 

On April 29, 1968, questionnaires were mailed to companies 
included in the mail canvass, and followup notices were sent to 
delinquents on June 11 (first followup) and June 25 (second 
followup). The personal enumeration began in July 1968, after 
enumerators (including a large number of college students) had 
been hired and trained during the month of June, and field 
operations were completed by the end of October. The Planning 
Board, however, was somewhat behind schedule in its clerical 
operations, and in order to close the Puerto Rico census office 
by November 15, some of the editing and rounding operations 
had to be finished at Census Bureau headquarters. 



Publication Program 

Preliminary results of the census of manufactures were 
published beginning in January 1970, and final reports became 
available beginning in mid-1970. The final reports contained 
general statistics (employment, payrolls, value added, and value 
of shipments) distributed by regions (Mayaguez, Ponce, and San 
Juan), standard metropolitan statistical areas, and municipios 
(see figure 7, p. 48), and by employment size. More detailed 
data, such as value of shipments by destination and class of 
customer and by kinds of products shipped, inventories by stage 
of fabrication, capital expenditures by type, and production 
worker man-hours, were also included. The final publications 
also showed general and other statistics for manufacturing estab- 
lishments classified by local (Puerto Rican) and nonlocal 
ownership. 

Business census preliminary results were published in March 
1970, and final reports became available in mid-1970. The final 
reports contained detailed data, by kind of business, on number 
of establishments, sales or receipts, payrolls, and employment 
for retail, wholesale, selected service, and construction establish- 
ments, for the Island, standard metropolitan statistical areas, 
and each municipio. 



48 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FIGURE 7. Puerto Rico 

MAYAGUEZ REGION 



SAN JUAN REGION 




PONCE REGION 



Places of 100.000 and over 

Places of 25.000-100.000 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas 




- 1 BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



REGIONS, SUBREGI0NS, PLANNING AREAS 



Subregion 



Planning Area 



Municipios 



1. Mayagiiez 



Mayagiiez 



Aguadilla 



Number 1 
Number 2 
Number 3 
Number 4 



Mayagiiez 

Anasco, Hormigueros, Cabo Rojo 

Las Marias, Maricao 

Lajas, Sabana Grande, San German 



Number 1 
Number 2 



Aguadilla 

Aguada, Isabela, Moca, Rincon, San Sebastian 



2. Ponce 



Ponce 



Guayama 



Number 1 
Number 2 
Number 3 
Number 4 



Ponce 

Guanica, Guayanilla, Penuelas, Yauco 

Adjuntas, Jayuya 

Coamo, Juana Diaz, Santa Isabel, Villalba 



Number 1 
Number 2 



Guayama 

Salinas, Arroyo, Patillas, Maunabo 



3. San Juan 



San Juan 



Arecibo 



Number 1 

Number 2 
Number 3 



Bayamon, Carolina, Catafio, Guaynabo, San Juan, 

Trujillo Alto 

Loiza, Rio Grande 

Comerio, Corozal, Dorado, Naranjito, Toa Alta, 

Toa Baja 





Number 


4 


Orocovis, Barranquitas 


Fajardo 


Number 
Number 
Number 


1 
2 
3 


Fajardo 

Ceiba, Luquillo, Naguabo 

Culebra, Vieques 


Caguas 


Number 
Number 


1 

2 


Caguas 

Aguas Buenas, Gurabo, Juncos, San Lorenzo 


Cayey 


Number 
Number 


1 
2 


Cayey 
Aibonito, Cidra 


Humacao 


Number 
Number 


1 
2 


Humacao 

Las Piedras, Yabucoa 


Manati and 
Vega Baja 


Number 
Number 


1 
2 


Barceloneta, Manati, Vega Alta, Vega Baja 
Ciales, Morovis 



Number 1 
Number 2 
Number 3 



Arecibo 

Camuy, Hatillo, Quebradillas 

Lares, Utuado 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



49 



GUAM AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS 

Historical Background and Authority 

The 1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral 
Industries constituted the third such canvass in Guam and the 
Virgin Islands; the first two canvasses covered the years 1958 
and 1963. 

Section 191, Title 13, of the United States Code states that 
the economic censuses of the United States "shall include each 
State, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and as may be determined 
by the Secretary, such other possessions and areas over which 
the United States exercises jurisdiction, control, or sover- 
eignty." 

Planning and Determining the Scope of the Censuses 

Both Guam and the Virgin Islands are administered under the 
Office of Territories of the U.S. Department of the Interior, 
with governors appointed every 4 years. Plans for the 
censuses were discussed with the governors and their staffs, and 
the close cooperation of the Island governments was instru- 
mental in successfully completing census operations. 

The scope of the 1967 censuses included the following 
industries as defined by the Standard Industrial Classification 
(SIC) Manual: 

Division and SIC Major Group 

Mining (not included for Guam) 10 to 14 

Manufacturing 1 9 to 39 

Wholesale Trade 50 

Retail Trade 52 to 59 

Services 70 to 79 

(except 702, "Rooming and boarding houses," and 704, 
"Organization hotels and lodging houses, on membership 
basis.") 

Although public warehousing (SIC codes 4214 and 422) was 
expected to be included within the scope of the censuses, only 
one establishment in this category was identified in the Virgin 
Islands (and in consequence no data could be published on the 
subject without violating confidentiality of the responses), and 
none was found in Guam. The contract construction industries, 
which were included in the censuses in the United States and 
Puerto Rico, were not covered in Guam or the Virgin Islands. 

Census Questionnaires 

The 1967 censuses questionnaires for Guam (form NC-X3G) 
and the Virgin Islands (form NC-X3V) were basically the same, 
and both closely resembled the 1963 questionnaires. The 
wording of some questions was revised, and a new inquiry was 
added on method of selling (at the establishment, mail order, 
house-to-house, or by vending machine). Although English is the 
predominant language in the Islands, a Spanish version of the 
Virgin Islands questionnaire, form NC-X3V(Sp), was also used 
as there are places in which Spanish is the principal language. 

Enumeration Methods 

In the Virgin Islands, the 1967 censuses were taken by a 
combination of mail and personal enumeration. In April 1968, 



mailing pieces which had been labeled at Census Bureau head- 
quarters and forwarded to the Postmaster in Charlotte Amalie 
were mailed to establishments included on the 1967 Business 
License List (issued annually by the Office of the Virgin Islands 
Territorial Government Secretary) which were readily 
identifiable as being within the scope of the censuses. Reports 
of the Social Security Administration (SSA) were used as a 
check on coverage and as a supplement to the License List 
mailing. There were two mailouts of reminder notices to 
delinquent establishments, and, beginning in mid-July, three 
Census Bureau staff members conducted a personal followup to 
secure reports from the unusually large number of firms that 
had not responded by that time. The field enumeration was 
completed by August 9. A total of 1,220 establishments were 
canvassed in the Virgin Islands (772 retail establishments, 268 
selected service firms, 85 wholesale trade establishments, and 95 
firms in the mineral industries and manufacturing categories). 

In Guam, the censuses were taken entirely by personal 
enumeration. Enumerators appointed by the Governor of Guam 
and sworn in as special census agents canvassed all roads, obtain- 
ing reports for all places where a business was found to have 
been conducted during calendar year 1967. Data collection was 
completed in late July 1968, and, after a preliminary screening 
of questionnaires for completeness and accuracy, the Governor's 
Office mailed the completed report forms to the Census Bureau 
on August 5. The Guam censuses included 553 establishments 
(387 in retail trade, 105 in selected services, 38 in wholesale 
trade, and 23 in manufacturing). 



Editing and Coding Returns 

Every questionnaire was screened for completeness and con- 
sistency of responses. Returns which could not be processed 
were sent back; those for Guam were returned to the Governor's 
office for classification and correction, and those from the 
Virgin Islands were turned over to the persons involved in the 
field followup there. All questionnaires were coded for kind of 
business and geographic area, certain data items were rounded, 
and each return was assigned a serial number. All operations in 
this phase were verified completely, and when the review was 
completed, the reports were transmitted to processing personnel 
for tabulation of results. 



Publication of Results 

Final reports of the 1967 Economic Censuses in the Virgin 
Islands and Guam were issued in August 1969. The Virgin 
Islands report presented data by kind of business for (1) the 
Virgin Islands as a whole, (2) the islands of St. Thomas and St. 
John, combined, and St. Croix, and (3) the cities of Charlotte 
Amalie, Christiansted, and Fredericksted. (See figure 8, p. 50.) 
Because of the limited number of establishments on St. John 
Island and the census disclosure rules, it was necessary to 
combine data for St. Thomas and St. John. 

The Guam report presented data by kind of business for 
Guam as a whole and for all cities and villages whose 1960 
population was 1,000 or more (see figure 9, p. 50). 



50 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FIGURE 8. Virgin Islands 




ST. THOMAS a ST- ^HN 



18° 00'- 



i ' — r- 



15 20 



ST. CROIX 




C A R I B BEAN 



SEA 



65°,00 




ANTILLESq 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
FIGURE 9. Guam 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



9 



Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 

ENTERPRISE STATISTICS 



INTRODUCTION 

As in 1954, 1958, and 1963, an enterprise statistics program 
was planned and implemented in conjunction with the 1967 
Economic Censuses. The 1954, 1958, and 1963 projects covered 
companies primarily engaged in business, manufactures, and 
mineral industries. For 1967, construction activities were 
included because a census of construction industries was re- 
instituted as part of the economic censuses. 



The 1967 Enterprise Statistics publication program consisted 
of three parts: 

Part 1. General Report on Industrial Organization 
Part 2. Central Administrative Offices and Auxiliaries 
Part 3. Link of Census Establishment and IRS Corporation 
Data. 



Essentially, the enterprise statistics program involves the re- 
grouping of census data records of establishments under com- 
mon ownership or control and assigning company codes to show 
various economic characteristics of the firms that own or 
control the establishments. By its nature, the enterprise 
statistics program is thus essentially a statistical byproduct of 
the regular census program. Statistics for the enterprise- 
establishment relationships are tabulated by type of company 
organization, by company size, and by industry classification, as 
well as by cross-tabulations which reveal company industrial 
diversification patterns. One special group of establishments, 
central administrative offices and auxiliaries, are examined in 
detail in a separate publication; and in another separate publica- 
tion, a statistical link is developed between census establishment 
data and corporation data compiled by the Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS). 



Two factors have made possible the development of the 
Census Bureau's enterprise statistics program in recent years: (1) 
The availability of high-speed electronic computers to 
manipulate the several million economic census establishment 
records in order to tabulate the necessary enterprise aggregates 
and their distributions and (2) the post-World War II capability 
of conducting the economic censuses by mail and administrative 
records instead of by field enumeration. In the earlier field 
enumerations, Census Bureau employees collected statistics by 
canvassing each establishment (the basic economic operating 
unit which produces or distributes goods or performs services at 
a single physical location), and it would have been difficult to 
regroup the establishment data to show common ownership or 
control. When conducting a census by mail, however, it was 
found to be desirable for purposes of administrative control to 
collect the individual establishment reports of multi- 
establishment firms on a centralized basis from the main office 
of each such company. This centralized collection system great- 
ly facilitated the regrouping of establishment data on an enter- 
prise basis. 



GENERAL REPORT ON INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION 

The General Report on Industrial Organization (1967 Enterprise 
Statistics, Part 1) presents census data collected for establish- 
ments aggregated to company totals. The primary contribution 
of the report to the economic analysis of U.S. industrial or- 
ganization lies in its unique ability to relate the statistical ag- 
gregates for companies directly with their component establish- 
ment statistics. Its tables, for example, reveal the extent to 
which companies engage in secondary activities (industrial 
diversification) and to what degree establishments classified in a 
given industry were owned or controlled by companies 
primarily engaged in other activities. 



Reassembling Establishment Data 

To accomplish the required reassembly of establishment data, 
the computer records of all establishments under common 
ownership or control were brought together by means of the 
company identification number appearing in each establishment 
record. Various codes were assigned to the company as a whole 
to describe its industry classification, employment size, industry 
size, and other economic characteristics. Then, these company- 
wide codes were introduced into the extracted establishment 
records. The company codes permitted the presentation of data 
in terms of the economic characteristics of both the establish- 
ments and the companies which own or control these establish- 
ments. Each company was classified in one of the 202 
"enterprise industry categories" developed especially for the 
enterprise statistics program by the Interagency Enterprise 
Industry Classification Committee composed of members 
representing various Federal statistical agencies. The basic 
criteria for the creation of these categories were economic sig- 
nificance (50,000 or more employees), degree of specialization 
in the enterprise industry (70 percent or more), and com- 
patibility with the 1967 establishment Standard Industrial Clas- 
sification (SIC). 



51 



52 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Use of Forms NC-K1 

Forms NC-K1 (Company Summary Reports) were of partic- 
ular importance in the enterprise statistics project. These 
questionnaires were sent to multiunit companies with 250 or 
more employees (or an estimated payroll equivalent), as derived 
from the IRS file of companies filing employer's quarterly tax 
returns (forms 941 ). NC-K1 forms provided vital information on 
company affiliation; supplied an unduplicated summary of 
reported establishment data; and yielded information on 
employment, on annual payrolls, and on activities of out-of- 
scope establishments. 1 

Creating Company /Establishment Record Files 

The final company/establishment record files for the 1967 
Enterprise Statistics Program were created in a 5-phase opera- 
tion involving both computer and hand editing: 

1. Extraction and assembly of multiunit company/ 
establishment records, creation of single-unit summary 
tabulation records, and extraction of large single-unit 
establishment records 

2. Intracompany editing on the computer of the assembled 
multiunit company-establishment records 

3. A two part detailed hand review of the computer editing 
(and of the records) for overall consistency, sense, and 
completeness 

4. Correction and verification of the multiunit and single- 
unit record files to be used in the enterprise statistics 
program 

5. Assignment of company-wide codes to the company- 
establishment record files 



Preparing Tables for Publication 

The company/establishment record files created in the computer 
operation were used to produce the tables published in the 
enterprise statistics report. Most of the tables were produced 
directly from the computer tabulations. Computers were pro- 
gramed to yield tables in final printer's copy format, and details 
on spacing of columns and related problems were worked out 
among the enterprise statistics staff, publications specialists, and 
systems analysts. A few tables were hand compiled by the enter- 
prise statistics staff, using the various computer tabulations and 
listings. 

Preparation of historical tables for the enterprise statistics 
publications basically involved converting 1963 industry codes 
and company codes to their 1967 equivalents and accomplishing 
various other conversions and corrections to allow for valid 
comparisons of 1967 and historical data. 

Disclosure Analysis 

Two different types of disclosure analysis procedures were ap- 
plied by the computer as necessary to avoid revealing data for 
individual firms. When a "number of companies" disclosure was 
specified by the enterprise statistics staff, if a cell had less than 



three companies or if the employment figure in a cell was less 
than 10, the actual employment figure was replaced by an 
alphabetic employment-size code. For those tables where a 
"dominance" disclosure was specified, if the sales and receipts 
of the two largest companies accounted for a dominant portion 
of the total cell sales and receipts, all dollar figures were 
replaced by the symbol "D." If the number of companies in the 
cells was less than three, the employment figure was replaced by 
the alphabetic employment-size code. In addition to these 
computerized disclosure analysis procedures, a complementary 
disclosure analysis was performed by the enterprise statistics 
staff to determine which figures had to be withheld to make it 
impossible to derive by subtraction the previously suppressed 
disclosure. 

Table Categories and Review 

Tables published in the General Report on Industrial Organiza- 
tion (1967 Enterprise Statistics, Part 1) were divided into the 
following seven categories, each constituting a chapter of the 
publication: 

1 . Establishment data as related to enterprise data 

2. Enterprise diversification 

3. Company employment-size distributions 

4. Company sales and receipts-size distributions 

5. Large company activities 

6. Conglomerate company activities 

7. Legal form-of-organization distributions 

The Bureau's enterprise statistics staff carefully reviewed the 
data at several stages during the pretabulation, tabulation, and 
publication phases of the project. The enterprise statistics staff 
usually met weekly with data processing personnel and the 
economic censuses coordinator in meetings of the Economic 
Censuses Systems Committee (see "Planning Committees," 
chapter 1, p. 8.) to discuss and resolve problems and expedite 
operations. Because of shortages of funds and time, some tables 
included in original publication plans had to be deleted. 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES AND AUXILIARIES 

Data on separately reported central administrative offices 
(CAO's) and auxiliary units of multi-establishment (multiunit) 
business and industrial firms covered in the 1967 Economic 
Censuses were presented in the 1967 Enterprise Statistics Series, 
Part 2, Central Administrative Offices and Auxiliaries. 2 The 



1 If the company was classified as primarily within the industrial scope 
of the 1967 censuses, these data were included in the enterprise statistics 
publication in order to give a complete picture of company activities. If 
the NC-K1 report indicated that the firm was primarily engaged in out- 
of-scope activities, only data for its in-scope establishments were 
published. 



2 A "central administrative office" is defined a^ an establishment 
whose employees are primarily engaged in general administrative, super- 
visory, purchasing, accounting, engineering and systems planning, legal, 
financial, or related management functions performed centrally for other 
establishments of the same company. 

An "auxiliary" is an establishment whose employees are primarily 
engaged in performing supporting services for other establishments of the 
same company (i.e., its mines, factories, retail stores, etc.), rather than 
for the general public or for other business firms. Auxiliaries include such 
diverse activities as research, development, and testing laboratories of 
manufacturing firms developing new or improved products with the 
company's own funds or on Federal contract; central warehouses for the 
company's own merchandise; central garages for the company's own 
vehicles; trading stamp redemption stores; milk receiving stations; and 
sales promotion offices. 

Sales branches and sales offices of manufacturing and mining 
companies, it should be noted, are not classified as auxiliaries but as 
wholesale trade establishments. Similarly, auxiliaries do not include 
commercial laboratories primarily engaged in research, development, and 
testing of products for other business firms on a fee or contract basis. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



53 



report provided information on company industry classification, 
company size, and other economic characteristics of the firms 
which operated these CAO's and auxiliaries. Detailed statistics 
were provided on their sales, billings to their own retail stores, 
beginning and end-of-year inventories, rental payments, capital 
expenditures, gross fixed assets, and cost of research and 
development. 

Classifying Establishments 

Each CAO or auxiliary establishment was classified by its 
principal function, on the basis of the distribution of its 
employees among the specified types of functions listed on its 
form NC-X6 (Central Administrative Office or Auxiliary 
Establishment Report). These functions were (1) centralized 
administration, (2) research, development, and testing, (3) 
warehousing, (4) trading stamp redemption, and (5) other 
miscellaneous functions. Reports that indicated that most 
employees were engaged in "sales to customers directly from 
this location" were usually reclassified, either as manufacturers' 
sales branches and sales offices (included in the wholesale trade 
portion of the business census) or as retail stores (included in 
the retail trade portion of the business census). 

In the numerous instances where the central office or 
auxiliary reported its employees in two or more types of work, 
the functional category with the largest employment was used 
to classify the principal function of the establishment. 

In addition to its principal function classification, each CAO 
or auxiliary establishment was assigned a primary "industry-of- 
establishments-servicea" code, based on the principal industry 
classification of the establishments within the company for 
which the CAO or auxiliary performed its supporting services. 
These "industry-serviced" codes assigned to CAO's and auxil- 
iaries, in most instances, represent major industry group (2-digit 
SIC) or industry group (3-digit SIC) levels of classification 
detail, rather than individual census industry (4-digit SIC) clas- 
sifications. 

These broader industry classifications were used because 
CAO's and auxiliaries of the larger and more industrially 
diversified companies (which account for the bulk of CAO and 
auxiliary activity) typically serve establishments classified in 
more than one census (4-digit SIC) industry. In such cases, 
central offices or auxiliaries which provided services for all 
establishments of the owning company were assigned an 
"industry-serviced" classification that was the equivalent of the 
entire company's primary industry classification. On the other 
hand, CAO's and auxiliaries which provided their supporting 
services only to particular groups or establishments within the 
company were assigned "industry-serviced" classifications that 
reflected these particular establishment groupings, rather than 
the overall company industry classification. 



Processing Forms NC-X6 

Form NC-X6 (Central Administrative Office or Auxiliary 
Establishment) was the primary instrument employed to collect 
these data. (This form is reproduced in Appendix G, "Facsimiles 
of Selected Questionnaires.") Each company covered in the 
1967 censuses was asked to identify and report separately as 
CAO's and auxiliary units those locations whose primary func- 
tions were to manage, administer, service, or support the 
activities of the other establishments of the company. A 
separate NC-X6 form was required for each CAO or auxiliary 
unit at a different location from the establishments it served. A 



separate report was also requested if the administrative or 
auxiliary activity was performed at the same location as one of 
the firm's establishments, provided it served two or more 
establishments and was not operated as an integral part of the 
establishment at the same location. 

A separate form NC-X6 report was not required, however, if 
the administrative office or auxiliary unit served only one 
establishment and was located at the same general location. 
Instead, data for such administrative and auxiliary activities 
were typically included in the census report totals of the 
operating establishments at which they were located (i.e., 
factories, stores, mines, etc.). 



Generating, Editing, and Correcting 
the Basic Data File 

The basic data file for each CAO and auxiliary establishment 
was generated directly from the punchcards on which data from 
NC-X6 forms were punched. 3 The data file then underwent 
preliminary computer editing, the results of which were 
reviewed by enterprise statistics analysts who specified cor- 
rections to be made to the file. This corrected NC-X6 data file 
became the source of preliminary CAO and auxiliary data 
tabulations, which were used (after disclosure analysis) 
primarily to prepare CAO and auxiliary tables for the 1967 
Census of Business Area Report publication series. 

The data file was further edited and corrected prior to its use 
for the preparation of the final multiunit company/establish- 
ment file, the file used in preparing final publication tables. This 
editing and correcting was designed to (1) assure complete 
internal consistency of all items, (2) convert the industry code 
into the final CAO and auxiliary industry code based on the 
principal function of the establishment, (3) correct geographic 
area codes, (4) assign a legal form-of-ownership code to each 
record, and (5) provide a final edit of the entire file. Computers 
were programed to extract from this data file the 1967 tabula- 
tions indicated in specifications provided by subject-matter 
analysts. 

The published reports on CAO's and auxiliaries include 
historical tables containing 1958 and 1963 data. Pretabulation 
computer processing of 1958 and 1963 company/establishment 
data files was therefore required to convert historical industry 
and company codes, correct records to reflect final revisions of 
1963 Enterprise Statistics reports, adjust 1958 and 1963 records 
to fit 1967 computer record formats, and, finally, to separate 
1958 and 1963 computer record files of CAO's and auxiliaries 
from the company summary record of all establishments of each 
multiunit company. 

The tables containing 1958, 1963, and 1967 data were then 
ready to be assembled, incorporated with descriptive text and 
graphics, and published. A preliminary report, ES67(P)-1, was 
published in July 1969. It presented data on the number of 
CAO's and auxiliaries, their employment and payroll, by their 
principal function classification; by the industry classification of 
the establishments they service; by geographic division, State, 
and standard metropolitan statistical area (SMSA); and by 
establishment employment-size class. Where available, 1954, 
1958, and 1963 data were also shown. Budget and time 



3 When a CAO or auxiliary was identified as part of a new multiunit 
company created by splitting a single-unit establishment, a form NC-X6 
was mailed to the company, or appropriate information was transcribed 
from the company's original questionnaire to an NC-X6. 



54 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



considerations resulted in a decision not to publish a final report 
on CAO's and auxiliaries. 

LINK OF CENSUS ESTABLISHMENT AND IRS 
CORPORATION DATA 

Plans for the enterprise statistics program of the 1967 Economic 
Censuses also called for the development of a statistical link 
between establishment data collected in the censuses and cor- 
responding financial statistics reported to the IRS by large 
industrial and business corporations filing 1967 corporate tax 
returns. 

The first successful Census-IRS link project was ac- 
complished for the 1958 Economic Censuses, and a similar 
program was conducted in conjunction with the 1963 censuses. 
The 1967 project, like its predecessors, will attempt to relate 
the establishment data collected in the censuses directly to the 
financial aggregates from the tax returns of the owning 
companies, as tabulated in the IRS Statistics of Income publica- 
tion series. 

Census Bureau analysts will accomplish this linking of two 
data systems. They will conduct a detailed analysis of computer 



tape records of corporation tax returns previously selected by 
IRS as representative of the approximately 1.5 million returns 
filed by active corporations. This sample provides IRS with the 
basis for compiling the detailed corporation data estimates 
appearing in the 1967 Statistics of Income publications. 

These same IRS tax returns will be systematically matched to 
1967 census establishment records, and for the successfully 
matched corporations, the appropriate census establishment 
records will be "linked" to the corresponding income tax 
records. In addition to these "explicitly matched" corporations 
(i.e., the IRS sample tax returns individually matched to their 
census establishment records), the census data of other corpora- 
tions will be considered "implicitly" matched if their counter- 
part establishments were classified in a single IRS industry. 

By aggregating the tax and census data of these matched 
corporations, it will be possible to relate, on a directly com- 
parable basis, the published industry distributions of corporate 
financial figures (such as net income and depreciation), available 
in the 1967 IRS Statistics of Income publications, with the 
establishment data (such as payrolls and value added) tabulated 
in the 1967 Economic Censuses. 



CHAPTER 

10 

Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: 
PUBLICITY AND THE PUBLICATIONS PROGRAM 



PUBLICITY 

The publicity program for the 1967 Censuses of Business, Manu- 
factures, and Mineral Industries consisted of (1) soliciting th,e 
cooperation of companies included in the precanvass of multi- 
unit firms, (2) encouraging the business community to lend its 
support during the data-collection phase of the censuses, and (3) 
informing the public of the availability of published census 
reports and promoting the use of the reports. 



Concurrently with the mailing of the precanvass question- 
naires in 1967, the Census Bureau released publicity stories to 
trade magazines and business papers, announcing the precanvass 
and explaining its objectives— to obtain complete and current 
mailing lists for the censuses to be taken in 1968. The stories 
emphasized that information provided in the precanvass would 
be treated with the same degree of strict confidentiality ac- 
corded to data collected in the actual censuses. Companies were 
also reminded that answers were mandatory and were en- 
couraged to respond as soon as possible. 



Before, during, and after the mailing of census question- 
naires, the Census Bureau distributed press releases and special 
news stories to trade publications serving each major industry 
and business group and to general news outlets. For example, in 
January 1968 (when the first questionnaires were mailed), more 
than 200 news releases, each relating to a specific type of 
questionnaire, were written and sent to the appropriate trade 
publications and associations. The general theme of most of this 
publicity was to encourage companies to respond accurately and 
promptly to the census inquiries, emphasizing the usefulness of 
census data to the business community and the confidentiality 
aspect while also mentioning the legal reporting requirement. In 
addition, a standard speech on the 1967 censuses was sent to 
the Census Bureau regional offices and Department of 
Commerce field offices throughout the United States for use by 
officials addressing business, industry, and civic groups. 



As the different series of census reports were released on a 
flow basis beginning in mid-1969, news releases relating to each 
series were sent to appropriate newspapers and trade publica- 
tions. When the various reports for geographic areas (such as 
States and standard metropolitan statistical areas) became 
available, news releases with a standardized format were sent to 
business editors of media serving these areas and to general news 
outlets. (See figure 10, p. 56, and figure 11, p. 57.) 



PUBLICATIONS PROGRAM 



General 



The Secretary of Commerce is required by law to "take, 
compile, and publish censuses of manufactures, of mineral 
industries, and of other businesses" every 5 years (Title 13, 
United States Code). The publications of these censuses serve 
thousands of users in the modern business community. 
Economic censuses data also contribute vitally to the Federal 
statistics program. Furthermore, the statistics collected in these 
censuses provide benchmark data for many privately and 
publicly compiled statistical series. 

To make census data more useful in a dynamic economy, the 
census publications program is committed to the timely release 
of data. The primary objective of the Census Bureau's publica- 
tions procedures is to reduce the gap between the tabulation of 
the data and their release to the public. 

It has been Bureau policy, historically, to issue preliminary 
data as soon as the first tabulations have been completed so that 
the public might have approximate summary information as 
soon as possible. After the tabulations are reviewed more 
intensively and the basic data corrected, the detailed reports are 
issued on a flow basis for the different States, industries, and 
subjects. Final reports are later assembled with additional 
materials into bound volumes. 1 

In the 1967 censuses, key publication series (such as the 
retail, wholesale, and selected services State reports and the 
manufacturing and mineral industries preliminary industry 
reports) were issued beginning in mid-1969, about 18 months 
after the period covered by the censuses, calendar year 1967. 
There were some delays in the release of 1967 census data, 
resulting mainly from the threefold increase in the use of 
administrative records of other agencies, which resulted in un- 
anticipated procedural difficulties, and from setting back the 
mailout of census questionnaires by about 2 months. 

Publications Procedures 

To improve the timeliness of the reports, every element of the 
publication process was scheduled for the earliest possible 



'The policy has long been, and continues to be, to publish all the 
separate census report series before devoting time to the preparation of 
the bound volumes which are designed to combine the final reports in a 
permanent and more convenient form for reference purposes. 



55 



56 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FIGURE 10. Example of a Press Release Announcing a Special Census Report 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF 




NEWS 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 20230 




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE FRIDAY, JULY 25, 1969 

Arthur E. Mi elk e 

UO-74OI CB69-62 

CENSUS BUREAU REPORTS ON FUELS AND ELECTRIC ENERGY USED IN MANUFACTURING IN 1967 

Fuels and purchased electric energy used by the Nation's manufacturing 
firms during 1967 cost these firms almost $7.8 billion, a report of the 1967 
Census of Manufactures, issued today by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau 
of the Census, reveals. 

The amount is 5 percent higher than that for 1966 and 22 percent higher 
than in 1963, year of the last previous Census of Manufactures. In a report of 
the 1967 Census issued earlier this year it was revealed the Nation's manufacturing 
firms had added $259.3 billion to the value of materials used in the manufacturing 
process. 

Of the $7.8 billion spent in 1967 about 65 percent was reported used by 
firms classified in the following major groups: Food and Kindred Products; Paper 
and Allied Products; Chemicals and Allied Products; Petroleum and Coal Products; 
Stone, Clay and Glass Products; and, Primary Metal Industries. 

The amounts paid out by the industrial firms in 1967 for fuels and for 

purchased electric energy were nearly equal — §>U billion for the former and $3-8 

billion for the latter, the report shows. 

The report, MC67(P)-7, is entitled: "Fuels and Electric Energy Used in 
Manufacturing: 1967", and is for sale by the U.S. Bureau of the Census and U.S. 
Department of Commerce Field Offices throughout the United States- The price is 
1C cents. 



Free, single copies of the report are available to the press from the News Room, 
U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20230. 

USC0MM-DC- 10365 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



57 



FIGURE 11. News Release Announcing a Series of Census Reports 



m 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF 




NEWS 



WASHINGTON, D.C. 20230 




Arthur E. Mielke 
440-7401 



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26, 1969 

CB69-21 



CENSUS BUREAU ISSUES FIRST '67 RETAIL TRADE CENSUS REPORT THE AREA REPORT 

FOR VERMONT 

The first retail trade report of the 1967 Census of Business — the area 

report for Vermont — was issued today by the U.S. Department of Commerce's 

Bureau of the Census. 

Retail trade reports will be issued for each of the 50 States, the District 
of Columbia, and for the United States, during the next two or three months. 

In addition to the "area" reports the Census Bureau will issue a series of 
"subject" reports. Included will be a report on Merchandise Line Sales. This 
will provide figures for kinds of business on sales by major lines of merchandise 
for each State, each Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), for each 
State outside its SMSA's, for each geographic division of the Nation, and for the 
Uni ted States as a whole. 

In another series, entitled Major Retai 1 Centers , retail trade statistics 
will be published for all SMSA's. Included will be separate statistics for the 
Central Business District of each city of over 100,000 and for about 1600 other 
shopping centers in the SMSA's. These reports will be issued starting in July. 

In mid-April the Census Bureau will start issuing State-by-State reports in 
each of the other two major divisions of the Census of Business: Wholesale Trade 
and Selected Services. These reports will be issued over a three month period 
ending in late July. 

The report issued today shows that retailers in Vermont had a total sales 
volume of $708 million in 1967, an increase of 32.4 percent over 1963, year of 
the last previous Census of Business. The report presents final State figures 
on sales volume, payroll, employment, and number of establishments for a number 
of kinds of retail business. It provides also the combined totals for all kinds 
of retail business in each city and county in the State. 

The report - Retail Trade: Vermont, BC67-RA47, is for sale by the 
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 
20402. The price is 50 cents per copy. 

Free, single copies of the report are available to the press from the News 
Room, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20230. 

USCOMM-DC-44360 



58 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



preparation date. Covers were designed, text written and set in 
type, maps and charts prepared, and table forms preprinted 
while the data were being processed so that the final computer 
tabulations could be converted to printer's copy as quickly as 
possible. 

The use of computers and high-speed printers to prepare 
reproducible copy for offset printing has greatly benefited the 
publications program. Many data tables can be reproduced in 
publication format by a computer and printed by the high-speed 
printer to save considerable time formerly spent in typing re- 
production copy from the summary tabulations. This procedure 
was first used by the Census Bureau to produce copy for the 
1954 business census reports and has been used extensively in 
each successive census. 



Cover designs and text materials— Differing cover designs, colors, 
and illustrations were used for reports of the different 1967 
censuses to assist the user in recognizing the various report 
series. For example, covers of area reports carried the ap- 
propriate State map, and subject reports displayed a pictorial 
representation of the topic covered (such as an illustration of 
shoppers in a department store for the covers of the reports on 
retail sales by line of merchandise). 

To expedite the preparation of printer's copy, all text 
materials for the separate census reports were scheduled for 
early preparation and editorial review. Most of the text was 
standard throughout a series, describing the census scope, 
coverage, and methodology, and defining the terms. This part of 
the text was written, reviewed, set in type, and reproduced in 
advance to be assembled with other printer's copy when the 
tables and charts were ready for printing. Text for the industry 
reports, which was tailored to each particular industry, required 
an elaborate time schedule keyed to the data-processing 
schedule so that the industry text would be ready at the same 
time as the data for a report. 

Text materials for the final bound volumes were more 
complicated, including numerous charts, analytical text, 
summary text, and expanded definitions of terms. These 
materials were prepared as soon as time permitted, but after the 
primary demands of census data users had been satisfied by the 
paper-bound reports. 



Publications tables— Generally, specifications for the tables 
included in a report were issued by the subject analysts in the 
form of table outlines. These table outlines were reviewed in 
detail by the editorial staff for conformance with Bureau 
policies and standards, marked for horizontal and vertical 
spacing to meet requirements of page image size and photo- 
graphic reduction, and marked to specify sizes and styles of 
type to be used in preprinting titles, headings, etc. Every table 
was analyzed from the standpoint of making maximum use of 
the computer to produce tables ready for offset copy. Clerical 
typing of printer's copy from machine tabulations is a slow 
operation compared with the 720 lines per minute produced by 
the high-speed printer associated with the computer. 

Unless the tabulations required intensive technical review 
which might result in extensive revisions or deletions, the tables 
were usually programed for production by the high-speed 
printer as final copy for offset reproduction. Also excepted 
were the few tables which could be typed by clerks more quick- 



ly than they could be programed, such as historical tables easily 
available from earlier publications and short summary tables 
compiled from the tabulation printouts for a single report. 
Summary tables compiled for each report in a series, however, 
were usually programed for computer production. 

Editorial review— Although the texts and the table outlines were 
edited prior to copy preparation, all final copy was reviewed 
and approved by the Bureau's editorial staff. The editor's 
principal function with respect to the printer's copy was to 
check the report for completeness and compliance with format 
requirements and Bureau policy. 

A checklist for final publication review was prepared for each 
series of reports to alert the reviewing editor to the peculiarities 
of the series. The checklist also included reminders of items of 
census publication format sometimes overlooked in copy 
preparation. Particular attention was devoted to reproduction 
quality of the copy and to such items as credits, table of 
contents, and folio (running head and page number) lines. 

Printing— General U.S. Government policy is that printing of 
Federal publications will be done by the Government Printing 
Office. However, limited printing facilities are also available at 
the Department of Commerce and in other Government 
departments. Both the Department of Commerce and the 
Government Printing Office subcontract printing to private 
contractors when their own facilities are working at capacity; 
hence, many 1967 censuses publications were printed 
commercially. Contracts were arranged by the Bureau with the 
Department of Commerce or the Government Printing Office, 
depending upon the requirements of each job. 

Distribution— The Census Bureau works with the Government 
Printing Office, the Department of Commerce and its field 
offices, and other organizations to encourage and simplify the 
distribution of census publications. In addition to its press 
releases, it issues a regular catalog of publications and 
announcement forms. Order forms giving the price for each 
series are printed and distributed just before the publication 
date. (See figure 12, p. 59.) 

All U.S. Government publications have a subsidized price; 
the originating agency pays all the costs for preparation of a 
publication and the printing of copies for its own use, so that 
the purchasers pay only for printing extra copies and for 
handling costs. The result is that the Bureau, like ail Federal 
agencies, makes information available to the public at a nominal 
charge. Prices of publications are based on a schedule main- 
tained by the Government Printing Office; prices of Bureau 
publications not prepared by the Government Printing Office 
are based on a similar schedule. 

The Bureau has the responsibility to insure that printed 
materials of public concern are placed on sale to the greatest 
extent practicable. Only a small quantity of each priced 
publication is printed and distributed for official use. Normally, 
most official distributions are for internal use or for 
quasi-official groups. The Superintendent of Documents sends 
the Bureau's publications to Federal depository libraries for 
Government publications so that copies are available in the 
major reference libraries of the country. In addition, the Bureau 
sends copies of its publications to census depository libraries 
maintained by of educational institutions located in areas with a 
large population. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



59 



FIGURE 12. Example of Publications Order Form (Descriptive Portion) 



ORDER FORM 

AREA REPORTS 
1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

Each report will be mailed as soon as it is printed. 


INSTRUCTIONS - Please indicate the number 
of copies you wish to purchase and mail with 
payment to: Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C, 
20402, or any U.S. Department of Commerce 
field office listed below. 


Area 


Retail 

trade 

(BC67-RA) 


Wholesale 

trade 
(BC67-WA) 


Selected 
services 
(BC67-SA) 


Area 


Retail 

trade 

(BC67.-RA) 


Wholesale 

trade 

(BC67-WA) 


( 


Selected 


services 
BC67-SA) 


No. 


Price 


Total 


No. 


Price 


Total 


No. 


Price 


Total 


No. 


Price 


Total 


No. 


Price 


Total 


No. 


Price 


Total 


U.S. Summary 




S2.00 






S1.25 






S1.75 




Nebraska 




S .55 






S .50 






S .55 




Alabama 




.75 






.50 






.70 




Nevada 




.50 






.45 






.55 




Alaska 




.45 






.40 






.50 




New Hampshire 




.50 






.45 






.55 




Arizona 




.55 






.45 






.55 




New Jersey 




1.00 






.55 






1.00 




Arkansas 




.65 






.50 






.60 




New Mexico 




.55 






.50 






.55 




California 




1.50 






.60 






1.50 




New York 




1.50 






.60 






1.25 




Colorado 




.60 






.50 






.65 




North Carolina 




1.00 






.50 






1.00 




Connecticut 




.75 






.50 






.70 




North Dakota 




.50 






.50 






.50 




Delaware 




.50 






.45 






.55 




Ohio 




1.25 






.60 






1.25 




Dlst. of Columbia 




.45 






.45 






.50 




Oklahoma 




.65 






.50 






.65 




Florida 




1.00 






.55 






1.00 




Oregon 




.60 






.50 






.60 




Georgia 




1.00 






.55 






.75 




Pennsylvania 




1.25 






.65 






1.25 




Hawaii 




.50 






.45 






.55 




Rhode Island 




.55 






.45 






.55 




Idaho 




.50 






.50 






.55 




South Carolina 




.70 






.50 






.65 




Illinois 




1.25 






.60 






1.25 




South Dakota 




.50 






.50 






.50 




Indiana 




1.00 






.55 






1.00 




Tennessee 




.65 






.50 






.75 




Iowa 




.70 






.55 






.70 




Texas 




1.50 






.65 






1.25 




Kansas 




.60 






.55 






.65 




Utah 




.55 






.45 






.55 




Kentucky 




.70 






.50 






.65 




Vermont 




.50 






.45 






JO 




Louisiana 




.70 






.50 






.65 




Virginia 




.70 






.50 






X5 




Maine 




.55 






.50 






.60 




Washington 




.65 






.50 






.65 




Maryland 




.60 






.50 






.60 




West Virginia 




.65 






.50 






.60 




Massachusetts 




1.00 






.55 






1.00 




Wisconsin 




1.00 






.50 






.75 




Michigan 




1.00 






.55 






1.00 




Wyoming 




.50 






.45 






.50 




Minnesota 




.65 






.50 






.70 




Total 

individual 

reports 




















Mississippi 




.60 






.50 






.55 




Missouri 




.70 






.55 






.70 




Complete 
sets 

{52 reports) 




40.10 






27.25 






39.05 




Montana 




.55 






.45 






.55 




• Combined reports covering retail trade, wholesale trade, selected services, mar 
mineral industries will be issued for the Virgin Islands and Guam. If you wish ar 
these reports, send your name and address to: Publications Distribution Section, 
Census, Washington', D.C. 20233. 


ufactures, and 
order form for 
Bureau of the 


Number of 
copies and/or 
sets 


Total amount 
S 


PUBLICATIONS TO BE SENT TO: (Precise print or type) 


Payment enclosed (Mark one): 

□ Check OR Charge to my 

Superintendent of 
1 | Money Documents Deposit 
order Account Number — j 

□ GPO 


Name 


Address (Number and street) 


City 


State 


ZIP code 


coupons 


























Make check or money order payable to: 

SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 



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60 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Bureau of the Census 

Washington. D.C. 20333 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 




POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



If your name is on several of our 
mailing lists, you may receive more 
than one copy of this order form. 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



61 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS 

Publications resulting from the 1967 Census of Business 
provided data covering retail trade, wholesale trade, and selected 
services. There are four basic series: area reports, subject 
reports, major-retail-center reports, and merchandise-line-sales 
reports. 



each county and each city of 2,500 inhabitants or more, the 
number of establishments for seven major kind-of-business 
groups are presented, in addition to the complete data for total 
selected services. State reports in this series were issued 
beginning in September 1969, an advance U.S. Summary was 
published in March 1970, and the final U.S. Summary was 
issued in May 1970. 



Area Reports 

Retail trade-(52 reports, series BC67-RA). A separate report 
was issued for each State, the District of Columbia, and the 
United States. Each State report presents data on the number of 
establishments, sales, payroll, employment, and the total 
number of active proprietors of unincorporated businesses. 
Statistics for 1 1 major kind-of-business groups are shown for all 
counties and unincorporated cities of 2,500 inhabitants or more 
in the State. More detailed kind-of-business information is 
presented for major areas-the State, standard metropolitan 
statistical areas (SMSA's), counties with 500 establishments or 
more, and cities with 500 establishments or more. The amount 
of detail— by kind of business— varies according to the number 
of establishments in the area. Also included are a table on 
establishments (such as post exchanges) operated by the U.S. 
Department of Defense and tables on central administrative 
offices and other auxiliary units servicing retail establishments. 



Wholesale trade— (52 reports, series BC67-WA). Included in this 
series are separate reports for each State, the District of 
Columbia, and the United States. Included in each State report 
are statistics on the number of establishments, sales, payroll, 
employment, and number of proprietors of unincorporated 
businesses for total wholesale trade, and the number of 
establishments and sales for merchant wholesalers and for all 
other wholesale types combined. For the State and SMSA's with 
2,000 establishments or more, these data are presented for 
detailed kinds of business; for SMSA's with less than 2,000 
establishments and for counties with 100 establishments or 
more, they are presented by varied kind-of-business detail. For 
each county and each city of 5,000 or more, statistics are also 
furnished on number of establishments and for sales for 
merchant wholesalers and for all other operating types 
combined. Data are provided on number of establishments and 
sales for the State by major kinds of business, for merchant 
wholesalers, manufacturers' sales branches and sales offices, 
merchandise agents and brokers, and other operating types 
combined. 

State reports were issued beginning in August 1969, 
continuing on a flow basis through 1970, and an advance U.S. 
Summary was published in March 1970. 

Selected services— (52 reports, series BC67-SA). A separate 
report was published in the selected services area series for each 
State and for the District of Columbia; a United States summary 
was also issued. Each State report includes information for the 
State on number of establishments, receipts, payroll, employ- 
ment, and number of proprietors of unincorporated businesses 
for detailed kinds of business in the personal, business, and 
repair service trades, for selected amusement and recreation 
service trades, and for hotels, motels, and tourist courts. For 
SMSA's and for counties and cities with 300 establishments or 
more, statistics were published by varied kind-of-business detail 
depending on the number of establishments in the area. For 



Subject Reports 

Retail trade— (four reports, series BC67-RS). This subject series 
contained reports on (1 ) sales size, (2) employment size, and (3) 
single units and multiunits, as well as (4) miscellaneous subjects, 
such as self-service stores, drug stores, and vending machine 
operators, each issued in a single report. Statistics are presented, 
by kind of business, on the number of establishments, sales, 
payroll, and employment, for the United States, each State, and 
selected SMSA's. 

Wholesale trade and public warehousing— (nine reports, series 
BC67-WS). Reports were issued on (1) sales size, employment 
size, and single units and multiunits, (2) credit sales, receivables, 
and bad-debt losses, (3) sales by class of customer, (4) 
warehouse space, warehouse equipment, and delivery equip- 
ment, (5) petroleum bulk stations and terminals, (6) commodity 
line sales, (7) miscellaneous subjects, (8) public warehousing, 
and (9) value produced, capital expenditures, fixed assets, and 
rental payments, by merchant wholesalers. Data were published, 
by kind of business and type of operation, for the United 
States and, where feasible, for geographic divisions, States, and 
SMSA's. 

The report on public warehousing presents information on 
the measures of space, revenue, employment, and payroll of the 
various types of public warehouses (for example, household 
goods warehouses, refrigerated warehouses, and frozen food 
lockers) for the United States, States, and the larger SMSA's. 

Selected services— (seven reports, series BC67-SS). This series 
includes reports on (1) hotels, motor hotels, and motels, (2) 
laundries, cleaning plants, and related services, (3) motion 
pictures, (4) law firms, (5) architectural and engineering firms, 
(6) travel agencies, and (7) miscellaneous subjects such as 
automotive repair establishments, bowling establishments, and 
dental laboratories, issued in a single report. Data were 
published by kind of business on number of establishments, 
receipts, payroll, and employment for the United States, each 
State, and selected SMSA's. 

The first of the subject reports became available early in 
1970, and the remaining reports were published on a flow basis 
throughout the year. 

Major Retail Centers 

Statistics for major retail centers were published in a separate 
series of final business census reports (49 reports, series 
BC67-MRC). Separate publications were issued for the United 
States, the District of Columbia, and each of the 47 States with 
SMSA's (all States except Alaska, Vermont, and Wyoming). 
Each report includes data for SMSA's within the State, for the 
major retail centers in the SMSA, and for the central business 
district in each city in the SMSA with 100,000 inhabitants or 
more. Statistics for the central business district include number 
of establishments, sales, payroll, and employment data for 
detailed kinds of retail businesses. Data are also presented for 



62 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



each majo! retail center other than the central business district 
on the number of stores and sales for all stores and for the three 
major groups of stores; number of stores are shown by kinds of 
businesses. Percent changes in sales, 1963 to 1967, are presented 
for central business districts, and the percentage distribution of 
sales are shown by kind of business. Maps show the total area 
covered and define the central business districts. The first major 
retail center reports were published in January 1970, and most 
of the reports were available by mid-year. 

Retail Merchandise Line Sales 

The retail merchandise line sales reports (52 reports, series 
BC67-MLS) included a separate publication for each State and 
the District of Columbia along with a United States Summary 
report. Tables provide data, by kind of business, for employer 
establishments on the number and total sales of establishments 
in a specified kind of business; number of establishments and 
total sales by 25 broad merchandise lines; the percentage of 
total sales accounted for by each of the 25 broad lines; and, for 
establishments handling a specific line, what percent of their 
total sales is represented by sales of that line. Additional 
merchandise line detail is shown for selected kinds of business. 
Data are shown for the United States, and for the States, SMSA's 
and for those parts of States not located in any SMSA. For the 
United States, data are also shown for each of the 25 broad 
lines, by kind of business. These reports were published 
beginning in mid-1970 and became available on a flow basis 
during the rest of the year. 

Reference Volumes 

After the final area and subject report series were published in 
separate reports, most were assembled in cloth bindings as 
Vojumes I to V. These volumes contain some additional 
explanatory material and graphics not published previously. The 
titles of the volumes are: 

Volume I. Retail Trade, Subject Reports 

Volume II. Retail Trade, Area Statistics 

Volume III. Wholesale Trade, Subject Reports 

Volume IV. Wholesale Trade, Area Statistics 

Volume V. Selected Services, Area Statistics 



CENSUSES OF MANUFACTURES AND MINERAL 
INDUSTRIES PUBLICATIONS 

The publications resulting from the 1967 Censuses of 
Manufactures and Mineral Industries were issued in separate 
report series which showed statistics by geographic area, by 
industry, and by subject (size of establishment, type of 
organization, etc.). Two types of statistics are provided: (1) 
General statistics (number of establishments, employment, 
payroll, man-hours, cost of materials, value of shipments, capital 
expenditures, inventories) and (2) statistics on quantity and 
value of materials consumed and products shipped. 

Preliminary reports containing early summary results were 
issued; these were superseded by more detailed final reports. 

Census of Manufactures 

Preliminary subject and summary reports— Included in this 

category are the report on "General Statistics for Industry 

Groups and Industries," MC67(P)-1, and the publication on 

"General Statistics for Geographic Divisions and States," 



MC67(P)-2. These were originally issued in mid-1969 and were 
revised early in 1970. Preliminary releases were also made 
available on "Fuels and Electric Energy Used in Manu- 
facturing," MC67(P)-3 and "Water Use in Manufacturing," 
MC67(P)-4. 



Preliminary industry report series— This series includes 416 
reports, MC67(P)20A to MC67(P)39E. These reports, typically 
one for each industry, provide industry totals for general 
statistics for the United States and for regions and States for 
each of 422 manufacturing industries. Comparable historical 
statistics are also included. Tables present United States totals 
for quantity and value of shipments of the products classified in 
the industry and for quantity and quality and cost of materials 
consumed by establishments in the industry. The first of these 
reports was issued in July 1969, and publication continued on a 
flow basis through mid-1970. 

Preliminary area report series— This series included 51 reports, 
MC67(P)S1 to MC67(P)S51, one for each State and the District 
of Columbia. The reports contain general statistics for each 
State and the larger standard metropolitan statistical areas 
within the State by 2-digit and 3-digit industry groups. In 
addition "all manufacturing" totals (no industry detail) are 
shown for most individual counties. These reports were issued 
during the period January to March 1970. 

Final industry report series— Encompassed in this series, 
MC67(2)-20A to MC67(2)-39E, are 80 reports, each providing 
information for a group of related industries (such as iron and 
steel foundries). Final figures for the United States are shown 
for each of the 422 manufacturing industries on quantity and 
value of products shipped and materials consumed, cost of fuels 
and electric energy, capital expenditures, assets, rents, 
inventories, employment, payrolls, payroll supplements, man- 
hours, value added by manufacturing, number of establish- 
ments, and number of companies. Comparable statistics for 
earlier years are provided where available. For each industry, 
data on value of shipments, value added by manufacturing, 
capital expenditures, employment, and payrolls are shown by 
geographic region and State, employment-size class of 
establishment, and by degree of primary product specialization. 
These reports became available beginning in mid-1970. 

Final area report series— There are 51 reports in this series, 
MC67(3)-1 to MC67(3)-51, including a separate publication for 
each State and the District of Columbia. Each report presents 
data for industries and industry groups on value of shipments, 
value added by manufacturing, employment, payrolls, payroll 
supplements, man-hours, new capital expenditures, inventories, 
assets, rents, and number of manufacturing establishments. 
Comparable statistics for earlier years are provided. Similar 
totals for all manufacturing industries are also shown for 
counties, SMSA's and their central cities, and other cities with 
significant manufacturing activity. For selected SMSA's and 
larger counties, data are shown by industry groups. The number 
of establishments in each major industry group is presented by 
size of establishment, county, SMSA, and city. Publication of 
these reports began in mid-1970. 

Final subject report series— Each of the eight reports in this 
series, MC67(1)-1 to MC67(1)-8, contains detailed final statistics 
for an individual subject, such as size of establishments, 



CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



63 



inventories, capital expenditures, assets, rents, fuels and electric 
energy, water consumption, materials consumed, and selected 
metalworking operations. Publication of these reports was 
initiated in mid-1970. 

Special report-A special report, MC67(S)-2, published in two 
parts, included information on percent of value of shipments 
accounted for by the four, eight, 20, and 50 largest companies 
in each 4-digit industry and in each 4- and 5-digit product 
group. 

Census of Mineral Industries 

Preliminary summary reports— In early 1970, the following 
summary reports were released: Series MIC67(P)-1, "General 
Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries," and MIC67(P)-2, 
"General Statistics for Geographic Divisions and States." 

Preliminary mineral industry report series— Beginning in early 
1970, 45 reports, MIC67(P)-10A to MIC67(P)-141, were released 
for industries or groups of industries in the minerals categories. 
They contain general statistics for the United States and for 
individual regions and States. Comparable historical data are 
also included. A product table presents totals for the United 
States, regions, and States on the quantity and value of 
shipments of the products classified in the industry and the 
quantity and cost of materials consumed by establishments in 
the industry. 

Final mineral industry report series— Beginning in late 1970, 14 
reports, MIC67(1)-10A to MIC67(1)-146, were released, each 
providing information for an industry or group of related 
industries (for example, bituminous coal and lignite mining). 
Final figures for the United States are provided for each of the 
50 mineral industries and 10 subindustries on quantity and 
value of products shipped and supplies used, quantity and cost 
of fuels and electric energy purchased, and the quantities of 
materials produced and consumed, capital expenditures, assets, 
rents, employment, payrolls, man-hours, cost of contract work, 
cost of purchased machinery, value added in mining, minerals 
development and exploration costs, number of establishments, 
and number of companies. Comparable figures for earlier years 
are included. Detailed statistics are shown by geographic region 
and State and by type of operation, and selected statistics are 



presented by size of establishment and by selected operating 
ratios. 

Final area report series— The area report series, MIC67(2)-1 to 
MIC67(2)-49, includes 49 reports, one for each of the States 
except Delaware and Maryland, which are combined with the 
District of Columbia in a single binding. These publications 
provide statistics for the State as a whole with comparable 
figures for earlier years. Data are shown for each of the 50 
mining industries, insofar as they have operations in the States, 
for 2- and 3-digit industry groups by type of operation and by 
county, and for the number of establishments by size and 
county. Statistics are also shown for value of shipments (with 
selected quantity figures), value added by mining, employment, 
payrolls, man-hours, capital expenditures, assets, rents, cost of 
supplies, purchased machinery installed, and number of 
establishments. These reports were issued beginning in late 
1970. 

Final subject report series— Beginning in late 1970, a series of 
reports, MIC67(1)-1 to MIC67(1)-7, was issued to provide 
detailed final statistics for individual subjects, such as size of 
establishment, and type of operation. 

Reference Volumes 

After the final industry, area, and subject series for 
manufactures 2 were issued as separate paperbound reports, they 
were assembled and reissued in the following clothbound 
volumes, which include expanded introductory text, summary 
text, and technical appendixes: 

Volume I. Summary and Subject Statistics 
Volume II. Industry Statistics 
Part 1 . Major Groups 20 to 24 
Part 2. Major Groups 25 to 33 
Part 3. Major Groups 34 to 39 and 1 9 

Volume III. Area Statistics 

Part 1. Alabama to Montana 
Part 2. Nebraska to Wyoming 



Primarily because of budget and time factors, clothbound volumes 
for general distribution were not prepared for mineral industries. 



CHAPTER 



11 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



BACKGROUND 

Although the Bureau of the Census conducts regular surveys on 
housing starts, number of construction permits issued, value of 
construction put in place, and other construction activities, its 
1967 Census of Construction Industries was the first attempt 
since 1939 to collect census-type data on the growth and opera- 
tion of the construction industry itself (such as employment, 
receipts, and classification and location of construction). The 
1929, 1935, and 1939 construction censuses were included in 
the business censuses taken for these years, but business 
censuses were suspended during World War II, and when they 
were resumed in 1948, coverage of the construction industry 
was not included. 

The 1967 Census of Construction Industries was conducted 
as part of the 1967 Economic Censuses. It was reinstituted in 
response to a growing demand for data on the expanding 
construction industry, which directly or indirectly generates em- 
ployment for an estimated 10 million workers and accounts for 
receipts of more than $1 00 billion per year. 

PRETEST OF THE CONSTRUCTION CENSUS 

The Census Bureau recognized that the resumption of the 
construction census after a 28-year hiatus would require that 
comprehensive plans and procedures be developed and tested. A 
small-scale pretest, therefore, was conducted in 1966, covering 
construction activities in 1965. This test was primarily intended 
to evaluate the response rate, by size of establishment, from 
respondents not previously canvassed in any of the Bureau's 
censuses or surveys. Other major objectives were to ascertain if 
the respondents could understand the questions and instructions 
and furnish data of acceptable quality without undue difficulty 
and if the Bureau could collect and process the information 
with efficiency and dispatch. 

Preliminary planning for this pretest was initiated in early 
1965. The planners relied heavily on comments and suggestions 
elicited from construction companies and other businesses, from 
trade associations (such as the Associated General Contractors 
of America, the National Association of Home Builders, and the 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce), from several census advisory com- 
mittees (such as the Census Advisory Committees of the 
American Statistical Association, American Marketing Asso- 
ciation, and American Economic Association), and from 28 
other Federal agencies (such as the President's Council of 
Economic Advisors, the Bureau of the Budget, the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development, and the Federal Home 
Loan Bank Board). Consultations were also held with Canada's 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, which was considering re- 
instituting a census of construction in that country. 



As planning progressed. Census Bureau specialists visited 
numerous construction companies throughout the country to 
discuss the pretest and the census itself and to obtain reactions 
to proposed questionnaires. Bureau staff members obtained the 
assistance of Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., and McGraw-Hill, Inc. 
(researchers and publishers in the fields of economics, statistics, 
and business) in identifying large construction firms for the 
pretest and census mailing list and in other developmental work. 
(For a complete list of trade associations contacted by the 
Census Bureau in connection with the 1967 Census of Construc- 
tion Industries, see appendix B, p. 93.) 

After considerable discussion, the Bureau decided to use the 
1964 County Business Patterns 1 file as the basic universe for the 
construction pretest sample. Copies were made of the County 
Business Patterns computer tapes for the first quarter of 1964, 
which included 305,562 single-unit company records and 
12,092 multiunit company records in the following Standard 
Industrial Classification (SIC) codes: 

15— Building construction (general contracting) 

16— Construction other than building construction (general 
contracting) 

17— Special trade contracting 

655— Subdividers and developers (real estate) 

656— Operative builders (real estate) 

In addition to these 318,000 firms, the pretest universe also 
consisted of about 3,000 "births" (new companies) added to 
the County Business Patterns file after the first quarter of 1964. 

In February 1966, a representative sample of 6,324 
companies was selected from the universe of about 320,000 
firms. The sample included 5,799 single-unit companies and 525 
establishments of multiunit firms, the majority of which (about 
60 percent) were special trade contractors. 

After considerable research and discussion, census planners 
decided to test two types of questionnaires (a long form, 
CBC-1T, and a short form, CBC-2T) in the construction census 
pretest. Both versions of the questionnaire contained identifica- 
tion and certification questions (establishment name and 
address, signature and title of person completing the report, 
etc.) and questions on kind of business (general contractor, 
special trade contractor, land developer, etc.); number of 
employees; payrolls; payments for construction work sub- 
contracted to others; payments for materials, components, and 
supplies; capital expenditures; business receipts; and classifica- 
tions of construction work (type of project, location of work, 
etc.). The questions on form CBC-1T, however, were somewhat 
more detailed. For example, a quarterly employment summary 



'See footnote, p. 4. 



64 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



65 



was requested instead of the semiannual summary asked for on 
form CBC-2T. The long form also contained some additional 
inquiries (for example, a question on payments for machinery 
and equipment rented or leased). 

Forms CBC-2T were sent to companies with one to three 
employees, and forms CBC-1T and CBC-2T were used alternate- 
ly for companies with four to 99 employees. Firms with 100 
workers or more received CBC-1T questionnaires exclusively. 
Most of the pretest questionnaires were mailed on March 7, 
1966, and were to be completed and returned by April 7. A 
supplemental mailout was accomplished on April 8 for selected 
multiunit companies and a sample of subdividers, developers, 
and operative builders; the due date for questionnaires included 
in this supplemental mailout was May 13. In total, 6,324 
questionnaires were mailed, including 2,653 forms CBC-1Tand 
3,671 forms CBC-2T. 

The companies included in the pretest were informed that 
they were required by law to respond, that the report was 
strictly confidential, that it could be seen only by sworn Census 
Bureau employees and would be used only for statistical 
purposes, and that the copy retained in the company's files was 
immune from legal process. 

The Census Bureau developed and applied stringent proce- 
dures to control the check-in and processing of returned 
questionnaires, correspondence, and PMR's (postmaster 
returns— mailing packages returned by the post office, usually 
because of incorrect or inadequate addresses). These procedures 
closely resembled those used for the multiunit precanvass (see 
"Developing the Mailing List For Multiunit Companies: The 
Precanvass," chapter 3, p. 17). 

Four followup mailings were accomplished to remind 
delinquent companies of their legal reporting requirements. The 
response rate for single-unit companies after the fourth follow- 
up was almost 88 percent, and for multiunit firms, approximate- 
ly 72 percent. The overall response rate for the pretest was 
about 86 percent, including 83 percent for the long form 
(CBC-1T) and 88 percent for the short form (CBC-2T). 

Coverage control procedures were applied to returned 
questionnaires to assure complete but unduplicated coverage of 
establishments of multiunit companies. The returns were then 
reviewed by Census Bureau clerks, who ascertained that the 
entries were consistent, measured the extent to which individual 
questions were answered, entered codes for specified items, and 
edited and rounded the reported dollar values. 

Various codes and selected data items were then punched on 
punchcards to prepare a "characteristics" tabulation. This 
tabulation provided construction census planners with informa- 
tion on the extent to which respondents answered individual 
questions and allowed for some measurement of the appro- 
priateness of answers to certain inquiries. A second compilation, 
a "data" tabulation, was used to analyze reporting charac- 
teristics of respondents (such as employment and payrolls). For 
example, the review of the data tabulation showed that the 
figure for reported "net construction receipts" was lower than 
anticipated. An intensive recheck revealed that there had been 
an error in the pretest sampling program, and the figure was 
revised. 

The information collected in this pretest was not analyzed as 
thoroughly as are census data. However, indications are that most 
establishments were able to report book figures or estimates for 
most items included on the pretest questionnaires. Pretest data 
were not published, but some estimates of raw data were 
developed for internal use and study. The pretest provided basic 
information used to revise questionnaires and instruction 



manuals where necessary, gave the Census Bureau invaluable 
experience in collecting and processing census-type data from 
construction companies, and revealed possible problem areas 
that might be encountered during the actual census. 



REPORTING ON AN ESTABLISHMENT BASIS 

The 1967 Census of the Construction Industries was conducted 
on an establishment basis, as were the censuses of business, 
manufactures, and mineral industries. For construction census 
purposes, a "construction establishment" was defined as a 
relatively permanent office or other place of business where the 
usual business activities related to construction are conducted. 
A relatively permanent office is one which has been established 
for the management of more than a single project or job and 
which is expected to be maintained on a continuing basis. 2 Its 
activities include (but are not limited to) estimating, bidding, 
scheduling, purchasing, supervision, and operation of the actual 
work being performed at one or more construction sites. 

Companies with more than one construction establishment 
were asked to submit a separate report for each establishment 
operated during all or any part of calendar year 1967. However, 
separate reports were not required for each project or construc- 
tion site. Information on each project or construction site was 
included in the report completed by the establishment re- 
sponsible for the work at each location. 



DEVELOPING THE CONSTRUCTION CENSUS UNIVERSE 

Employers 

The construction employer establishments to be enumerated in 
the census of construction industries were included in the 
overall program to develop the mailing list for the 1967 
Economic Censuses. (See Chapter 3, "Developing the Mailing 
List.") The "employer" category consisted of all construction 
companies in the active records of the Internal Revenue Service 
(IRS) that were subject to the payment of Federal Insurance 
Contribution Act (FICA) taxes, or about 400,000 single-unit 
firms and 3,000 multiunits accounting for another 7,000 estab- 
lishments. 

A sample of about 1 25,000 employers was selected from this 
universe, and only these establishments were asked to complete 
census questionnaires. The sample consisted of all multiunit 
companies, all single-unit firms with payroll equivalents of 10 
employees or more, and a sample of single-unit companies with 
fewer than 10 employees. The sampling rates among the smaller 
firms varied from 4 percent to 95 percent. Data obtained from 
the sample of smaller companies were inflated and combined 
with information from the multiunits and larger single-unit 
firms to present statistics for all construction establishments 
with employees. 

Precanvassing construction employers— Combined IRS and 
Social Security Administration (SSA) administrative records 
yielded a list of employers which included the employer 
identification (El) number, the name and address, the industry 



2 There were two exceptions to the "relatively permanent office" 
definition. First, in the case of joint ventures, a separate establishment 
questionnaire was required covering the venture even though it might 
have been established only to undertake a single given project. Secondly, 
where separate legal entities were established to carry out only a given 
project or part of a project, separate reports were required for each legal 
entity. 



66 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



or kind-of-business code, and an approximation of the size of 
the firm. However, because the El number applies to a legal 
entity and not to an individual establishment, this list had to be 
supplemented by contacting all known or possible multiestab- 
lishment companies to obtain a list of their individual businesses 
and their locations. 

This was accomplished in a precanvass of multiunit com- 
panies conducted during the period March 1967-February 1968. 
Construction companies were included in the same precanvass 
with the businesses, factories, and mines canvassed for the 
censuses of business, manufactures, and mineral industries. This 
precanvass is described in detail in chapter 3, "Developing the 
Mailing List for Multiunit Companies: The Precanvass." 

Nonemployers 

Construction companies with no paid employees during 1967 
were not required to complete census questionnaires. Informa- 
tion for these companies was extracted from IRS administrative 
records. (See "Collecting Data From Administrative Records," 
p. 67.) 

The nonemployers were identified in the previously 
described process of matching information derived from 
business income tax records to the employer file, on the basis of 
common El numbers. Income tax records that could not be 
matched to the employer file were further classified on the basis 
of several characteristics normally considered to be consistent 
with construction companies without employees. Basically, 
companies reporting receipts in 1967 but not included on the 
list of firms required to pay FICA payroll taxes were included in 
the nonemployer universe. 



CONSTRUCTION CENSUS QUESTIONNAIRES 

Information for the 1967 Census of Construction Industries was 
obtained from employer establishments primarily through the 
use of one standard questionnaire, form CC-1. Form CC-1 was 
developed through refinements of the two report forms used in 
the pretest, but it more closely resembled the pretest long 
questionnaire, form CBC-1T. 

In view of the fact that no construction census had been 
taken for 28 years, the form CC-1 inquiries were generally 
limited. The questionnaire included inquiries on the number of 
construction establishments; employment; payrolls; total 
business receipts; construction receipts; payments for work sub- 
contracted; cost of materials, components, and supplies; pay- 
ments for rental of machinery and equipment; and capital 
expenditures. Respondents were also requested to provide 
various estimated percentage breakdowns of the construction 
receipts figure. Information was requested on the types of 
construction engaged in; on the location (State) of the construc- 
tion work; on the ownership (public or private) of the construc- 
tion work; on the class (new or maintenance and repair work) of 
construction; and on the extent work was subcontracted in 
from other construction contractors or builders. In addition to 
the statistical data, information was obtained on the re- 
spondent's physical location. El number, company affiliation, 
and legal form of ownership. This information was used to 
assure completeness of coverage and permitted the classification 
of each establishment by type of organization and geographic 
location. 

The Census Bureau also wanted to obtain some measure of 
the amount of contract construction work of firms not 
scheduled to participate in the construction census because their 



activities were primarily covered by other censuses. This 
information was collected by using "tie-in" inquiries on selected 
census of business and census of manufactures questionnaires. 
(For example, the question on merchandise receipts appearing 
on the business census questionnaire for retail establishments 
asked the respondent to include receipts from customers for 
on-site construction.) In addition, a tie-in inquiry designed to 
measure the amount of new construction undertaken by a 
manufacturing company's own "force account" employees was 
included on the MA-100 questionnaire. (See "Questionnaires for 
ASM companies," chapter 5, p. 26.) 

The 1967 Census of Construction Industries benefited from 
several of the general questionnaires used in the censuses of 
business, manufactures, and mineral industries. (See "General 
Forms," chapter 5, p. 25.) For example, when companies 
indicated on forms NC-X3 General Schedules (which were sent 
to firms that the Census Bureau had not been able to classify by 
type of business or industry) that they were primarily engaged 
in contract construction activities, they were added to the 
construction census universe. 



THE MAIL CANVASS 

Questionnaires were mailed to the employer firms in February 
1968, and data collection operations were essentially completed 
by the following September. Six followups were conducted in 
which delinquent respondents were sent notices reminding them 
of their legal reporting requirements. However, over half of the 
establishments in the mail universe (about 57 percent) had 
returned their questionnaires even before the first reminder 
notice was sent, and by the time of the sixth followup in 
October 1968, only 7.5 percent of the mailed cases were 
delinquent. (Specific procedures used in mailing out construc- 
tion census questionnaires, checking in returns, and following 
up delinquent respondents were substantially the same as those 
employed in the censuses of business, manufactures, and 
mineral industries. These are described in detail in Chapter 5, 
"Preparations for Mailing Questionnaires," and Chapter 6, 
"Data Collection Operations.") 



ESTIMATING PROCEDURES FOR EMPLOYERS 

Since questionnaires had been mailed only to a sample of 
construction establishments with payroll equivalents of fewer 
than 10 employees, sample estimation techniques were 
employed to derive aggregate data for all establishments in this 
category. The published statistics are the totals of the estimates 
for the sampled firms and the aggregates of the larger firms 
(those with payroll equivalents of 10 or more employees). 

Statistics on the number of establishments and on the 
number of proprietors and working partners are simple unbiased 
estimates. Since payroll and business receipts data for 1967 
were available from administrative records, other forms of 
sample estimation could be used. Many of the published 
statistics from the census are highly correlated with either 
payroll or business receipts, and more precise estimates could be 
made by taking advantage of this information rather than by 
simply inflating the reported data in terms of the selection 
probabilities. Although payroll and receipts information was 
available in theory for all firms from the various administrative 
records, it was not possible to obtain this information for some 
firms because of the difficulty in bringing together the different 
administrative records files. In these cases, it was necessary to 
impute for the missing items. 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



67 



The estimates of payroll and employment take advantage of 
the IRS payroll data. Similarly, estimates for cost of materials, 
subcontract payments, receipts, capital expenditures, and 
machinery rental utilize total receipts data available for each 
firm from IRS. 

COLLECTING DATA FROM ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS 

As previously mentioned, construction companies with no paid 
employees in calendar year 1967 were not asked to complete 
census questionnaires. Receipts data for these firms were 
obtained from 1967 business income tax returns. In determining 
the number of establishments, each separate income tax return 
was assumed to be for an establishment. A nonemployer firm 
was counted only once even though in a limited number of cases 
(about 21,000) available information indicated that the same 
firm had filed more than one 1967 tax return. (For a complete 
description of the collection of census data from administrative 
records, see "Planning the Use of Data From Administrative 
Records," chapter 2, p. 12; "Collecting Data From Administra- 
tive Records," chapter 6, p. 37; and "Processing Administrative 
Records Data," chapter 7, p. 43.) 

It was necessary to initiate data-processing operations before 
all companies had filed their 1967 tax returns. About 15,000 
nonemployers were therefore omitted, but these establishments 
account for less than one-half of 1 percent of the total 
construction receipts. Also excluded from census tabulations 
were about 13,000 nonemployers reporting no receipts for 
1967. 



PROCESSING OF DATA 

Completed questionnaires underwent extensive processing fol- 
lowing their receipt. Specific procedures, again, closely followed 
those used in the censuses of business, manufactures, and 
mineral industries. (See Chapter 7, "Censuses of Business, 
Manufactures, and Mineral Industries: Data Processing," p. 39.) 

A preliminary visual screening at the Jeffersonville Census 
Operations Division identified obviously deficient question- 
naires and those needing clarification of certain items. If 
necessary, respondents were contacted to resolve the problems. 
Data were then transcribed to punchcards, transmitted to 
Census Bureau headquarters via a telephone-computer link-up, 
and transferred to computer magnetic tape. 

All records underwent a detailed computer review and 
analysis with records containing significant problems being 



rejected. These were reviewed analytically and, where necessary, 
further contacts were made with the respondents. The 
computers were also used to perform coding (industry coding, 
geographic coding, etc.) and to impute for missing items for the 
small number of reports not received in time for tabulation. The 
data tapes were then tabulated to produce "advance" tabula- 
tions on an industry basis. These were subjected to analytical 
review and selected statistics were prepared for advance reports. 
All such reports were reviewed before publication to insure that 
they met publication standards and did not disclose confidential 
data for individual companies. Corrections resulting from this 
review were made to the computer records, and more extensive 
final tabulations were produced. The data again underwent 
analytical review in preparation for the publication of the final 
reports, which contain considerably more detail than was 
available in the advance reports. 



PUBLICATIONS PROGRAM 

Beginning in September 1969, a series of advance industry 
reports, series CC67(A)-I, was issued on the 1967 Census of 
Construction Industries. These reports present data by kind of 
business on the number of establishments; receipts; employ- 
ment; payrolls; payments to subcontractors; payments for 
materials, components, and supplies; payments for rental of 
machinery and equipment; and capital expenditures. In ad- 
dition, more detailed data on construction receipts are shown 
relating to new construction than are shown for maintenance 
and repair work, ownership (public versus private) of construc- 
tion, location of work, and type of work (single-family houses, 
industrial buildings, streets and roads, etc.). 

Final industry, area, and special reports were issued begin- 
ning in mid-1970. The 25 industry reports, series CC-67-I, 
contain data shown in the advance reports (updated where 
necessary) plus additional detailed tables. The 52 area reports, 
series CC-67-A, contain statistics similar to those in the industry 
reports for each State, the District of Columbia, and the United 
States. Plans for the special report series, CC-67-S, called for 
selected data to be published for industry by type of company 
and legal form of organization. These reports also were planned 
to include data on specialization in primary types of construc- 
tion. All final reports were subsequently assembled and reissued 
in cloth bindings as Volumes I and II, 1967 Census of Construc- 
tion Industries. 



CHAPTER 



12 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



INTRODUCTION 

In 1948, the 80th Congress, recognizing the inadequacy of 
transportation data and the need for appropriate action by the 
Department of Commerce to overcome these deficiencies, 
passed Public Law 671, which authorized a census of transporta- 
tion. This law, with clarifying language, was incorporated into 
Title 13 when the statutes were codified in 1954. 1 

Although the Department was thus authorized to conduct a 
census of transportation in 1949, funds were not appropriated, 
and the census was not undertaken. Subsequently, funds were 
appropriated for preparatory work (which was started in 1951) 
to develop methods for use in the census then scheduled for 
1953. However, funds were not approved for including a trans- 
portation census in either the 1954 or 1958 economic censuses. 
In July 1961, hearings were again held by the Subcommittee on 
Census and Government Statistics to discuss the need for a 
census of transportation, with particular reference to plans for 
undertaking the census in 1963. Thereafter, funds were ap- 
propriated and a census of transportation commenced in April 
1963 with a passenger transportation survey. 

During the 12-year span between the beginning of develop- 
mental work in 1951 and the first census, the Bureau continued 
to conduct research activities on a modest scale. Most of this 
work was accomplished on a reimbursable cost basis for other 
government agencies or nongovernmental organizations 
requiring data not currently available. The activity proved to be 
an excellent testing ground for the methods subsequently 
adopted for the 1963 and 1967 censuses. 

Before the 1963 census, nearly all available transportation 
statistics were byproducts of regulatory and promotional 
activities of the State and Federal Governments. Statistics were 
adequate for some aspects but inadequate or nonexistent for 
other areas of equal or greater public importance. In general 
terms, data obtainable from books of account and customary 
operating records (such as information on revenues, employees, 
payrolls, operating costs, and inventories) were available for 
railroads, commercial air carriers, large interstate truck and bus 
carriers subject to the Interstate Commerce Commission's 
economic regulations, pipelines, and the regulated segment of 
inland water carriers. 



'Title 13, United States Code, approved August 31, 1954, contains 
the principal provisions that relate to Census Bureau activities. Section 
131 directs the Secretary of Commerce to take— 

". . . censuses of manufactures, of mineral industries, and of other 
businesses, including the distributive trades, service establishments, 
and transportation (exclusive of means of transportation for which 
statistics are required by law to be filed with, and are compiled 
and published by, a designated regulatory body), in the year 1954 
and every fifth year thereafter, and each such census shall relate to 
the year immediately preceding the taking thereof. . ." sub- 
sequently changed to 1958 and 1963 then to 1967, 1972, etc. 



Statistics on the volume of commodities, by origin and 
destination, length of haul, charges paid by shippers, and other 
"traffic flow" information were available for railroads through 
the Interstate Commerce Commission's 1-percent sample of 
waybills (receipts showing lists of goods accepted for shipment). 
Point-to-point passenger travel data for scheduled air carriers 
were published, as were statistics on the number of airplanes 
and the volume of air traffic controlled through Federal 
Aviation Administration facilities. Data on commodity move- 
ments by inland water carriers also were published by the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, and statistics on the distribution of 
selected agricultural products (such as fresh fruits and vege- 
tables) were collected and published by the Department of 
Agriculture. 

Nevertheless, there were critical gaps. Among the most 
important was the almost complete lack of data showing the 
volume of traffic by each mode of transportation and the 
geographic redistribution of commodities. 

The available information on passenger travel was wholly 
inadequate, not only with respect to the relative volume of 
travel by each means of transport but also with respect to 
reasons for trips, distances traveled, and other factors needed to 
improve forecasting of transportation requirements and 
markets. Although State motor-vehicle registration records 
indicated the total number of vehicles registered, there were no 
reliable breakdowns on number of vehicles by body type, 
capacity, and use. 

The 1963 Census of Transportation, the first national census 
of transportation, 2 was necessarily a pioneering effort with 
respect to both the economic areas covered and the survey 
techniques used. The primary objective was to close (or at least 
narrow) major gaps in statistical knowledge without duplicating 
data already available from other sources. To achieve this 
objective, a program consisting of a series of individual surveys 
was adopted; each survey was aimed at specific gaps in 
knowledge instead of being combined to form the single unified 
project common in other censuses. 

The 1967 Census of Transportation saw the further refine- 
ment of procedures and the perfection of techniques. Also, 
larger samples generally yielded more reliable estimates. Since 
the 1967 program closely paralleled the program established in 
1963, comparability and trend analysis were possible for the 
first time. Planning for the 1972 census calls for further 
improvements in the data while maintaining as much 
comparability as possible. 



2 Earlier censuses taken by the Bureau covered only specific areas of 
transportation, e.g., the censuses of water transportation taken periodi- 
cally between 1880 and 1926, and the statistics on street railways, 
trolley- bus, and motorbus operations obtained by the early censuses of 
electrical industries taken at 5-year intervals between 1902 and 1926. 



68 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



69 



The 1963 and 1967 transportation censuses differed from 
other censuses in three additional respects. The first involved 
the reporting units for collection of data. Economic censuses are 
typically based upon data compiled from summary book figures 
(such as sales, production, employment) for an "establishment" 
during the census year. In the transportation area, the analogous 
organizational unit was the "carrier." The importance of 
summary book figures on a carrier basis is so widely recognized 
that all Federal regulatory bodies require annual reports from 
virtually all classes of carriers under their jurisdictions. 

In the "establishment" area, the major data gap to be filled 
by the transportation census involved only those for-hire motor 
carriers not subject to the reporting requirements of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. These carriers accounted for 
a relatively small percentage of total intercity transportation 
service. To derive maximum benefits in this specific area, the 
transportation census program was limited to the collection of 
annual-report-type data for bus and truck carriers not subject to 
Federal regulation. 

The second major difference involved the nature of the data 
themselves. A major gap in transportation statistics resulted 
from the lack of available data on shipments. This information 
was not readily obtainable from books of account or other 
summary records maintained by establishments or carriers. For 
example, much of the total transportation service was self- 
supplied as an integral part of the total activity of the parent 
company (such as a company's motor fleet transporting 
materials from one plant to another). In such cases, the trans- 
portation activities normally were not shown separately in the 
company's books of account. 

In addition, the impact of transportation service on shippers, 
travelers, and the Nation's economy had generated needs for 
kinds of data that could not be supplied by carriers 
themselves— i.e., the passenger travel patterns, relative dis- 
tribution of shipments among classes of carriers (including 
private), and the Nation's truck resources. Therefore, it was 
necessary to go to other sources to get most of the data for the 
transportation census. 

The third major difference lay in the extent to which 
sampling procedures were used in the transportation census. The 
censuses of business, manufactures, and mineral industries 
collected most basic data on a total enumeration basis (either by 
questionnaires or administrative records) although sup- 
plementary data often were collected by sampling. In contrast, 
the 1963 and 1967 transportation censuses used probability 
sampling to obtain virtually all of the data. 

The transportation program was also unusual with respect to 
the timing of the data collection. Instead of a single starting 
date, data collection began on a different date for each major 
project. In the 1967 transportation census, data collection 
commenced in February 1 967 for the National Travel Survey, in 
April 1967 for the Truck Inventory and Use Survey, and in 
March 1968 for the Commodity Transportation Survey. 



OUTLINE OF MAJOR PROJECTS 

The 1967 Census of Transportation consisted of three major 
projects. A fourth major project undertaken in 1963, the Motor 
Carrier Survey, was conducted as part of the 1967 Census of 
Business. 



The National Travel Survey yielded statistics showing 
national and regional passenger transportation patterns and their 
relationship to socioeconomic and geographic factors. Data were 
gathered on trips, person-trips, person-nights, and person-miles, 
by origin and destination, purpose of trip, and mode of 
transport employed. 

The Truck Inventory and Use Survey accumulated data 
concerning the Nation's trucking resources, such as the number 
of trucks (total and classified by physical characteristics), 
occupational use of trucks, measures of the intensity of vehicle 
utilization, and geographic distribution of vehicles. 

The Commodity Transportation Survey collected informa- 
tion on the physical and geographic distribution of commodities 
shipped by the manufacturing sector of the national economy, 
measured by tons and ton-miles. The basic information was 
derived from a probability sample of bills of lading (or other 
shipping records) obtained from a probability sample of manu- 
facturing plants. Additionally, "byproduct" or special studies 
resulting from this survey included a study on the domestic 
movement of exports, a survey of small plant activity (including 
plants with 10 to 19 employees), and a special study of the 
printing and publishing industry. 



NATIONAL TRAVEL SURVEY 

The primary objective of the National Travel Survey was to 
measure national and regional travel patterns and their relation- 
ships to the socioeconomic characteristics of persons who 
traveled. It provided profiles of the volume and characteristics 
of travel by the civilian population of the United States. 

Survey Design 

The basic trip information was obtained by means of four 
quarterly mailouts to a probability sample of approximately 
18,000 households. The first quarterly mailout began in 
February 1967 and requested information about trips taken by 
each member of the household "since New Year's Day." Three 
subsequent mailouts were made for each of three panels to 
obtain, insofar as possible, a full year's record for each house- 
hold. The mailouts were accomplished as follows: 



Panel A 
Panel B 
Panel C 



First 
mailout 



Feb. 1, 1967 
Mar. 1, 1967 
Mar. 29,1967 



Second 
mailout 



May 3, 1967 
May 31, 1967 
June 28, 1967 



Third 
mailout 



Aug. 2, 1967 
Sept. 6, 1967 
Oct. 4, 1967 



Fourth 
mailout 



Nov. 1, 1967 
Jan. 3, 1968 
Jan. 3, 1968 



The major passenger traffic flow data obtained for each trip 
included (1) origin and major destination of the trip, (2) month 
the trip ended, (3) type of transport used, (4) major reason for 
the trip, and (5) who (in the specified household) took the trip. 
Additional information was obtained concerning the number of 
nights away from home (plassified by overnight ac- 
commodations used) and the number of nights spent in each 
State during the trip. 

For purposes of this survey, a trip was defined as "travel by 
one or more members of the household to and from (a) an 
out-of-town place for overnight or longer, or (b) a place at least 
100 miles away from home." By definition, each trip was a 
round trip started and ended at home. Person-trip data were in, 
terms of the number of persons in households on a trip 
multiplied by the number of trips taken. 



70 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Socioeconomic and demographic data on the travelers had 
been previously obtained for the sample by personal interview 
in the Current Population Survey (CPS), a household sample 
survey of the civilian noninstitutional population of the United 
States. 



Survey Method 

The method chosen for conducting the National Travel 
Survey— questionnaires mailed quarterly to about 18,000 
households— was determined partly by the survey's objectives 
and partly by other considerations, such as costs, availability of 
resources, technical feasibility, and experience gained from a 
pilot survey designed to test the reliability of mail surveys. 



Pilot survey— The stated purpose of the pilot survey was to 
measure the reliability of trip data collected by a mail survey of 
households. The 1966 test, a prelude to the 1967 National 
Travel Survey, was conducted for two quarters. Questionnaires 
were mailed in March and June of 1966 to a sample of house- 
holds in Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, and New York. 
About 94 percent of the 736 households canvassed in March 
had responded by the cutoff date of May 1 1 . Approximately 85 
percent of the June panel, which was reduced to 716 house- 
holds, responded within a month after mailout. A routine mail 
and telephone followup by the Census Bureau regional office 
staffs was conducted. This followup procedure established the 
framework for the procedures used in the 1967 National Travel 
Survey. Quality of response in this pilot test was considered 
good, and the overall project was considered a success. 



Regional Office Responsibility 

Although the National Travel Survey was primarily a mail 
survey, the Census Bureau regional offices provided a number of 
indispensable services. Specifically, the regional offices— 

1. Established a control file of sampled households 

2. Checked in questionnaires returned by the respondents 

3. Edited questionnaires for completeness and consistency 

4. Followed up, by mail and telephone, all nonresponses and 
failed-edit cases 

5. Attempted to verify addresses or obtain new addresses for 
mailing packages returned by the post offices 

6. Transmitted to Bureau headquarters completed 
questionnaires, problem cases, and postmaster returns for 
which addresses could not be corrected or verified 

7. Submitted progress reports 

Telephone and mail followup, conducted primarily by field 
personnel, improved the overall response rate considerably, both 
in the pilot survey and in the 1967 National Travel Survey itself. 

Survey Procedure 

The use of sampling techniques, as opposed to complete 
enumeration, was deemed the most advantageous in terms of 
cost and utilization of resources. Furthermore, census analysts 
believed that a household sample would be more efficient than 
other available sampling methods in producing national totals 
and in obtaining data needed for computing relationships 
between travel patterns and socioeconomic factors. 



A nationwide probability sample of 12,000 households 
originally selected for the Census Bureau's CPS, 3 and a "North- 
east Corridor" supplement of 6,000 households, constituted the 
sample. 4 The survey was conducted by mail, supplemented as 
necessary by telephone or personal interview for clarification or 
followup. The Christmas holiday season, ending with New 
Year's Day, was used as the benchmark time reference, and the 
time period, as specified by the initial questionnaire, was for 
"all trips by members of the household ending in 1967— from 
New Year's Day to the end of the year." 

The sample of 18,000 households was divided into three 
random groups. The questionnaire (form TC-100) was sent to 
the first group in February 1967 to obtain information on travel 
since New Year's Day— a period of about 6 weeks. In May, a 
second mailout was conducted to update the travel record. As a 
guide, any trips previously reported were summarized in a 
special section of the questionnaire, and the persons in the 
household were listed in another special section. The same 
procedure was used in two subsequent mailouts to complete the 
year's record for those households. 

The other panels were handled similarly. The initial question- 
naires to each group were mailed in March and April, respective- 
ly, and were updated by subsequent inquiries containing 
summary listings of previously reported trips and the names of 
household members. 

In order to obtain a year's record for as many as possible of 
the households in the survey, the original sample was retained 
throughout the year. If families moved, the questionnaires were 
forwarded to their new addresses. No supplementary households 
were added to represent population growth or to offset attrition 
due to other factors (such as when a family moved without 
leaving a forwarding address). 

The trip information was supplemented by demographic and 
socioeconomic factors obtained by the CPS personal interview. 
These factors included family composition (members of house- 
hold by age and sex), income level, education and occupation of 
the head of the household, and information on the location of 
the home (such as region, city size, and whether located within 
or outside the central cities of standard metropolitan statistical 
areas). 

The CPS sample design is a multistage probability plan 
which, despite its complexity, is roughly equivalent to a simple 
plan of dividing the entire Nation into segments— each consisting 
of a cluster of about six households— and selecting segments 



3 CPS was used as the collection mechanism for the 1957 Travel Sur- 
vey which was taken by the Census Bureau for the National Association 
of Travel Organizations. However, the objective then was to measure 
total travel, classified by its characteristics, which could be accomplished 
by a system of monthly rotating panels. No attempt was made to develop 
household or personal annual travel patterns as the National Travel Sur- 
vey program beginning in 1963 has done. CPS and the Quarterly House- 
hold Survey (QHS) was the operational vehicle for the main travel survey 
in 1963 and for those parts of the evaluation program that rely on 
personal recall for quarterly and annual periods. 

4 Two expired CPS rotation panels yielded a net national sample of 
roughly 12,000 households. This sample was supplemented by 6,000 
households in the "Northeast Corridor," the area along the Atlantic 
Coast from Boston to Washington. The purpose of the supplement was to 
obtain for the Office of High-Speed Ground Transportation of the U.S. 
Department of Transportation more detailed estimates of origins and 
destinations of travel in the Corridor than could be developed from the 
basic sample. 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



71 



proportionate to population. For the most part, this is ac- 
complished by grouping all of the Nation's counties and 
independent cities into clusters termed primary sampling units 
(PSU's), stratifying them according to their socioeconomic 
characteristics, and selecting a sample of 357 PSU's to represent 
the United States as a whole. 

Although the sample design was primarily intended to 
represent the Nation as a whole, it was also used for developing 
estimates of travel originating in (1) metropolitan as compared 
with nonmetropolitan areas as a group; and (2) each of the four 
broad regions of the country (Northeast, South, North Central, 
and West). The sample design was not suitable for measuring 
travel in smaller areas, such as trips originating in a specific 
State, or trips between selected pairs of States. 

Survey Questionnaires 

The following questionnaires were used in conducting the 1967 
National Travel Survey: 

1. Form TC-100, the basic National Travel Survey 
questionnaire, was mailed from Census Bureau head- 
quarters to respondents. A postage-paid return envelope 
was enclosed in the mailing package. A copy was 
simultaneously forwarded to the Bureau's regional offices 
for use in telephone followup or mail followup (for 
respondents without telephones). 

2. Form TC-100a, the initial transmittal letter, was sent with 
the form TC-100 in the first mailout. 

3. Form TC-101b, the quarterly letter, was sent with the 
forms TC-100 in the mailouts for the second, third, and 
fourth quarters. 

4. Form TC-102, the reminder card for first followup, was 
sent to regional offices simultaneously with the mailout 
from Washington and was sent from the regional offices to 
panel members who failed to complete and return their 
questionnaires. 

5. Form TC-103, followup letter, was used with a duplicate 
copy of TC-100. The regional offices sent the TC-103 
forms and duplicate TC-100's (by certified mail) to 
respondents who failed to complete the questionnaire 
after the second followup. 



A mail file register was compiled on computer tape for house- 
holds included in the survey sample. This tape was created from 
punchcards which in turn contained information extracted from 
"field control cards" used to summarize data collected in the 
CPS and Monthly Labor Survey (MLS). The address of each 
household was coded to indicate what socioeconomic informa- 
tion was available on its source field control card. 

As trip data became available from the first National Travel 
Survey quarterly returns, a person-trip register was created. The 
returned questionnaires contained ail the data (after proper 
coding) necessary to punch a person-trip record for each 
member of a household reported for each trip listed. In ad- 
dition, a no-trip record was punched for households reporting 
no trips. The no-trip record contained only the data from the 
questionnaires' coded address labels (the limited socioeconomic 
and demographic information originally extracted from the CPS 
and MLS field control cards). 

These registers were combined to form a computer tape, the 
National Travel Tape, which contained person-trip records and 
no-trip household records and lacked only the desired socio- 
economic data not available from the field control cards. To 
obtain this data, the National Travel Tape was "matched" with 
the tape containing all socioeconomic information obtained in 
the CPS and MLS. The expanded National Travel Tape then 
contained all data required for tabulations. 

Published tabulations included the following: 

1. Number of trips, cross-classified by all trip characteristics 
and some traveler/household characteristics 

2. Number of person-trips cross-classified by all trip charac- 
teristics and some traveler/household characteristics 

3. Number of person-miles and person-nights, distributed by 
certain trip and household characteristics and by type of 
lodging 

4. Person-trip interregional data for the four major regions of 
the United States, distributed by purpose of trip and 
family income level 

5. Interregional person-miles and person-nights by type of 
transport and purpose of trip 



Processing the Data 

The respondents mailed to the regional offices their completed 
form TC-100 trip questionnaires. The regional offices checked 
in and edited the reports and forwarded them to Census Bureau 
headquarters for coding and processing. Coded data were 
transcribed to coding sheets and used to prepare punchcards. 
Computers were used to edit and process the punchcards, to 
transcribe information to magnetic tapes, and, ultimately, to 
tabulate the data. 

Quality control of coding and punching of data cards was 
attained by building a number of matching operations into the 
processing program. National Travel Survey data were coded 
and punched in a pyramidical arrangement which permitted a 
variety of matchings and cross-checks between cards. An overall 
quality control program was established to reduce punch errors, 
and cards punched manually by new keypunch operators were 
100-percent verified. 

Two registers were used to integrate the demographic, socio- 
economic, and trip data collected in the National Travel Survey. 



Survey Calendar 



Operation 



Completion date 



Questionnaire designed June 1 966 

Questionnaires approved by Budget Bureau September 1966 

Questionnaires sent to printer December 1966 

Processing specifications written: 

Original February 1967 

Last revision October 1 967 

Final revision of computer programs completed . . . July 1968 
Mailouts accomplished (13 different mailouts) .... First of month 

(beginning 
February 
1967) 

Questionnaires edited and coded (Monthly flow 

basis) 

Last quarter returns completed May 1968 

Punchcards prepared (Monthly flow 

basis) 

Last quarter returns completed June 1968 

Results tabulated August 1 968 

U.S. Summary published June 1969 

Bound volume published October 1970 



72 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



TRUCK INVENTORY AND USE SURVEY 

Survey Objectives and Method 

Vehicle registrations revealed that there were approximately 15 
million trucks 5 in the country in 1967, but before 1963, 
relatively little was known about the physical characteristics or 
operational aspects of the trucking industry. Therefore, one of 
the major segments of the 1963 Census of Transportation was 
the Truck Inventory and Use Survey, which was designed to 
collect detailed information from a sample of about 120,000 
power-units (trucks and truck-tractors) selected from State 
motor-vehicle registration records maintained for private and 
commercial vehicles. Data for the sampled trucks were obtained 
from registration records and from a questionnaire mailed to 
vehicle owners. The 1967 Truck Inventory and Use Survey was 
the second such survey. 

Statistics from the 1963 and 1967 Truck Inventory and Use 
Surveys have been used to prepare articles for trade publications 
and have formed the basis for research into various marketing 
aspects of the trucking business. The data have been reproduced 
to create a public-use tape that has been purchased and used for 
research purposes by other government agencies, by engineering 
firms, and by manufacturers of trucks and truck-tractors and 
trailing units. The basic trucking statistics have been used by the 
Census Bureau to compile various special tabulations useful in 
answering requests and preparing more extensive tabulations for 
other government agencies, private consulting firms, trade 
publications, trade associations, and other organizations. 

The data developed by this survey can be divided into five 
subject-matter classes: (1) Physical characteristics of the 
Nation's private trucking fleet such as type of vehicle, type of 
fuel, year model, vehicle weight, and type and size of body; (2) 
major use of trucks, such as for personal use, for-hire, leased or 
rented to others, or operated in connection with own business; 
(3) rough indicators of the intensity of vehicle use, such as total 
vehicle miles driven during the previous year, total miles driven 
since the vehicle was new, whether vehicle is normally used to 
transport goods in both directions or only in one direction; (4) 
geographic area of operations, measured in terms of whether the 
vehicle was used primarily for local, intermediate, or long hauls; 
and (5) major characteristics of vehicles, by size and composi- 
tion of fleets, as measured by the number of vehicles operated 
out of the "home base" (principal city or county from which 
the vehicle is operated). 

The universe from which the sample was selected was the 
total number of private motor-vehicle registrations, as reported 
by the Bureau of Public Roads of the U.S. Department of Trans- 
portation. Census data developed by the sample were converted 
to percentage distributions and applied to this universe. 

Sample Design 

The Truck Inventory and Use Survey at the national level was 
based on a stratified probability sample of about 120,000 



trucks 6 selected from approximately 15 million registrations on 
file with motor vehicle departments in the 50 States and the 
District of Columbia. 

The first stratification of the national sample, at the State 
level, consisted of three strata based on the total number of 
trucks registered annually. A sample of about 1,500 truck 
licenses or registrations was drawn in the small States, 3,000 in 
the States of intermediate size, and 4,500 in the largest States. 

The second stratification was based on vehicle size, as 
indicated by the motor vehicle registration record. Two vehicle 
size strata were used— "small" and "large." 7 The dividing line 
between small and large trucks differed from State to State, 
depending upon the criteria for indicating vehicle size in the 
registration records. Customary random sampling procedures 
were used to select the sample from each of the two strata in 
each State. 

A copy of the questionnaire used in the Truck Inventory and 
Use Survey (form TC-200) was mailed to the owner of each 
truck selected in the sample. The vehicle was identified on the 
form, prior to mailing, by inserting in item 1 (vehicle identifica- 
tion), the vehicle make, year model, registered weight, and 
license number shown on the motor vehicle registration record. 
The owner was requested to reply only for the identified truck 
or combination even if he owned other vehicles. The sample was 
expanded back to the State level by multiplying each truck by 
the reciprocal of the sampling rate used to select it from the 
"universe" of State vehicle registration records. 

Data Collection 

A private research firm had compiled a computerized listing of 
registration records of 29 States, and the Census Bureau decided 
that time and money could be saved by selecting its sample 
from this listing. The remaining State records were sampled 
directly by Bureau personnel, either through manual record 
sampling "on location" or by sampling a universe listing 
provided in various forms by the States. 

The samples were selected shortly after the close of the 
annual reregistration date in each State in order to have an 
updated list of license numbers and mailing addresses. Since the 
timing of the registration cycle differs from State to State, two 
inventory dates were used— April 1 and July 1 . 

The specific license number, make, year model, and 
registered weight for each sampled vehicle, and the owner's 
name and address, were obtained from the State record. This 
identifying information was recorded on the questionnaire 
before mailing, and the owner was asked to supply additional 
information for the specified vehicle. 

The response rate was high. Replies were received for 96 
percent of the trucks drawn in the sample, and the response rate 



5 The term "truck" in this report is used in its commonly accepted 
sense as being a property-carrying motor vehicle used on public highways 
and streets. In a technical sense, a truck may be a "single-unit truck" or it 
may be a "combination." The latter consists of a power unit (a "truck- 
tractor") and one or two trailing units (most commonly a "semitrailer"). 
The most frequently used combination is popularly referred to as a 
"tractor-semitrailer" or a "tractor-trailer." 



technically, the licenses or registrations sampled were those for 
single-unit trucks and for truck-tractors. Registrations for trailers or other 
nonpowered property-carrying highway vehicles were either not sampled, 
or (if inadvertently included in the sample because they were not 
recognized in advance) were treated as "out of scope" in the subsequent 
processing. 

'The terms "small" and "large" were used only in connection with 
stratification, and should not be confused with the vehicle size classes 
shown in the tabulations. 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



73 



was almost as high for most of the major questions. The general 
quality of response also was good, as judged by the consistency 
among answers to various questions on the form and the ap- 
parent reasonableness of replies. 

Preprocessing Activities 

The return envelope enclosed with the form TC-200 was ad- 
dressed to the Bureau's Jeffersonville Census Operations 
Division. At Jeffersonville, the following functions were 
performed to assemble and prepare the data for processing at 
Bureau headquarters: 

1. Check-in— Approximately 102,000 questionnaires were 
processed at Jeffersonville between May 1967 and March 
1968, and a detailed check-in control procedure was 
established and used. 

2. Questionnaire editing— The TC-200 form was precoded, 
except for several write-in items. Coding was therefore 
minimal, and the editing was the principle clerical task. A 
detailed item-by-item instruction and imputation chart 
was prepared, and each return was screened. Returns that 
"failed edit" were referred to analysts and where neces- 
sary (for certain omissions or inconsistencies) were then 
remailed to the respondent for completion or correction. 
Questionnaires deemed acceptable and postmaster returns 
were forwarded to a check-in punch unit. The check-in 
information was transmitted to Bureau headquarters to 
update the mail file register and insure that respondents 
were not included in followups. 

3. Followup— Three followups were scheduled for each of 
the six individual mailings of groups of States. The first 
followup mailing was conducted 30 days after the initial 
mailout, the second 20 days after the first followup, and 
the third 10 days after the second followup. A reminder 
postcard was used in the first followup, a letter with 
duplicate questionnaire in the second followup, and a 
certified letter in the third followup. 

4. Card punching— A card was punched for each of the 
102,000 trucks for which partial or completed returns 
were received. The data sources were the State registration 
record card, the truck owner's responses on the question- 
naire, or imputed values for items not answered on the 
questionnaire. Coded and punched information included 
the following physical characteristics and occupational 
uses, which became the basic data record for each truck: 



Physical Characteristics 

A. State of registration 

B. Year, model, and make 

C. Load length or capacity 

D. Registered weight 

E. Vehicle type (single unit or 
tractor) 

F. Type of fuel used 

G. Axle arrangement 

H. Number of powered axles 
I. Body type and size 
J. City and State base of 

operation 
K. Number of trucks operating 

from base of operation 



Operational Uses 

A. Annual mileage 

B. Lifetime mileage 

C. Area of operation 

D. Major use 

E. Principle product carried 

F. One-way or round-trip 
loads 

G. Frequency leased to others 
without driver 

H. Gross or loaded weight 

I. Who performs maintenance 



Punchcard data were then transmitted to Census Bureau 
headquarters for data processing, machine edit, machine imputa- 
tion of annual vehicle miles (if missing), and tabulations. 

A sample verification program of coding and punching opera- 
tions was designed to allow a maximum of 3-percent error in 
average outgoing quality. 



Data Processing 

Some machine editing was performed before tabulation. 
Machine edit consisted of checking for impossible codes and 
preparing a series of tabulations to produce analytical tables 
used to compare 1967 and 1963 data. The editing was 
performed on three kinds of data fields: (1) Legitimate code 
fields, (2) table look-up fields, and (3) content fields. 

The legitimate code fields included type of vehicle, fuel, 
axles, body type, use, hauling under ICC authority, vehicle 
leased, round trip loads, maintenance, and area of operation. 
These fields could contain only specific codes that appeared 
checked on the schedule and were matched against the code 
matrix. 

The table look-up fields were those appearing with values 
that could be checked against code limits stored in the 
computer, such as region and State code, sample weight, and 
base of operation. 

Content fields included serial number, registered vehicle 
weight, short or long term lease, miles driven past 12 months, 
and miles driven since new. These fields had to be numeric. 

Preliminary computer runs were used to analyze the nature 
of the statistical distributions and the extent of sampling 
variability (how much the sample varies from the universe). 
They were also used as a partial basis for judging the probable 
nature and extent of response (or nonsampling) errors. 

A principal purpose of the analytical programs was to place 
trucks and tractor-trailer combinations into approximate weight 
groups (light, medium, light-heavy, and heavy-heavy) on the 
basis of five structural characteristics (vehicle type, body type, 
number of axles on power unit, number of axles on trailing unit, 
and length of load space). 

On the basis of those analyses, detailed tabulation specifica- 
tions were prepared. In general, tables were developed by sum- 
marizing the preliminary totals as required to produce useful 
information for States, regions, and the Nation. 

The specifications for the published tables were dependent 
largely on the results of the preliminary runs. Tabulation pro- 
grams were written for the UNI VAC 1107 computer in 
FORTRAN, a programing language designed for problems which 
can be expressed in algebraic notation. The tabulation program 
was designed to produce data of major public value, but it did 
not attempt to produce the additional tabulations that could be 
obtained by additional cross-classifications and regroupings. 

Tabulations were made for the 50 States and the District of 
Columbia, for nine geographic divisions, and for the United 
States as a whole. 

Major tabulations included the following (by number and 
percent distribution of trucks and truck-miles): 

1. Light, medium, light -heavy and heavy-heavy trucks, cross- 
classified by geographic division and State 



74 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



2. Other physical characteristics, such as vehicle type, cross- 
classified by use characteristics 

3. Major use classes, cross-classified by geographic division 
and State 

4. Major use classes, cross-classified by selected vehicle and 
operational characteristics 



Comparisons with 1963 Report 

Although the basic purpose and scope of the 1963 and 1967 
surveys were essentially identical, some changes were introduced 
in 1967 that unavoidably make comparisons difficult. 

Some questions asked in 1963 were dropped in 1967, and a 
few new items were added. On the basis of 1963 experiences, 
census analysts concluded that many of the data required for 
large trucks were not needed for small trucks. Furthermore, the 
wording or sequence of a few questions asked in 1963 appeared 
to have been misleading, especially the inquiries on occupational 
use and on number of axles. To simplify the reporting and 
clarify the intent of several questions, the sequence of items, 
the appearance of the form, and the precise wording of some 
questions, were substantially modified. 

Preliminary analyses indicate that these technical factors may 
have caused many of the 1963-versus-1967 differences. Some of 
these variations may reflect significant changes in the "real 
world," and others may be explained by sampling variability. 

The 1963 and 1967 data are directly comparable for the 
following five major variables: (1) Major use, (2) size class, (3) 
body type, (4) age of truck, and (5) annual vehicle miles. In 
1967, the figures for annual vehicle miles included imputations 
for missing responses, whereas there was no imputation program 
in 1963. 



Survey Calendar 

Operation Completion date 

Budget Bureau approval of questionnaires received October 1966 
Registration selection method and sample rate for 

each State determined March 1967 

Contract with private research firm signed March 1967 

Initial truck registration records received April 1967 

First Mailing Address Register prepared May 1967 

Mailout to State Group I (2 States) May 1967 

First followup (reminder card) June 1 967 

Second followup (letter) June 1967 

Third followup (certified mail) July 1967 

Mailout to State Group 1 1 (7 States) June 1 967 

First followup August 1967 

Second followup August 1967 

Third followup September 1967 

Mailout to State Group III (10 States) August 1967 

First followup September 1967 

Second followup October 1 967 

Third followup November 1967 

Mailout to State Group IV (24 States) October 1967 

First followup None 

Second followup December 1967 

Third followup January 1 968 

Mailout to State Group V (5 States) November 1967 

First followup None 

Second followup January 1968 

Third followup February 1968 



Operation Completion date 

Mailout to State Group VI (3 States) January 1968 

First followup None 

Second followup January 1968 

Third followup February 1968 

Edit and coding specifications completed (clerical) April 1967 

Edit and coding specifications completed 

(machine) June 1 967 

Programing specifications completed: 

Imputation August 1967 

Tabulations: 

1. State July 1967 

2. Census Division and United States May 1968 

Variance calculated August 1967 

Paperback reports published: 

1. State (1st State) May 1968 

2. Division (1st Division) January 1969 

3. U.S. Summary June 1969 

Bound volume published December 1970 

"Public Use Tape" available : February 1969 



THE COMMODITY TRANSPORTATION SURVEY 

The prime objective of the Commodity Transportation Survey 
was to measure the transportation and geographic distribution 
of commodities shipped by manufacturing establishments in the 
United States. "Traffic flow" data with respect to the relative 
volume of commodities shipped by means of transport, length 
of haul, size of shipment, and areas of origin and destination 
were to be obtained. 

Procedures were developed for sampling shipping records 
maintained in company files; relatively small samples at each 
plant give satisfactory results (when combined into shipper- 
group totals) at only a small fraction of the time and expense 
required to summarize all shipments. The major part of the 
survey was based on shipping data obtained from a sample of 
about 13,000 plants selected from the census of manufactures 
universe of manufacturing establishments with 20 or more 
employees. The other part of the survey consisted of mailing a 
simplified Tpage questionnaire to 2,000 sample plants in the 
total employment size class of 10 to 20 employees, and to 
about 1,400 sample plants in the printing and publishing 
industry. 



Commodity Coding 

The commodity flow data are classified by the Transportation 
Commodity Classification (TCC), a 5-digit code identical to the 
first five digits of the "Standard Transportation Commodity 
Classification" adopted by the railroads and motor carriers. The 
function of this code is to classify commodity flows. It is 
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) "oriented" in the sense 
that its general structure closely resembles the SIC, extended by 
the product code structure used to classify commodities for 
production data in the Census of Manufactures. (See "Planning 
the Classification of Industrial Activity and Products," chapter 
2, p. 13.) 

A "bridge" has been developed between the TCC and the 
product codes used for the census of manufactures in order to 
achieve comparability between commodity flow and production 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



75 



data, thereby gaining an added dimension not available from 
either set of data used alone. Generally speaking, most TCC 
5-digit commodity codes are not identical to SIC codes but can 
be equated to them. 



Survey Design 

To obtain data for the series of reports on shippers, areas, and 
commodities, 8 a two-stage probability sample design was used. 
The first stage involved selecting a probability sample of about 
13,000 plants from the universe described above. The second 
stage involved the selection of a probability sample of about 
100 to 200 of the bills of lading or other shipping documents on 
file at each of the sampled plants. Specific facts (such as origin, 
destination, commodity, weight, and means of transport) were 
recorded from each of the sampled documents. 

In general, the first stage of the sample design involved clas- 
sifying manufacturing plants into 86 shipper classes. Those 
classes were then regrouped into six "tonnage divisions," based 
on the total tons reported shipped by the shipper class in the 
1963 Commodity Transportation Survey. Each manufacturing 
plant also was identified by its location and was classified as 
either located in a production area, 9 or located outside of any 
production area. 

Within each of those six tonnage divisions and two geo- 
graphic areas, the probability of selecting any given plant in the 
universe was proportionate to the "intercity tonnage rating" of 
the plant. The rating for each plant was based on the intercity 
tons shipped by the average plant of the same shipper class and 
employee size group, as reported in the 1963 survey. 

With respect to the allocation of plants within the sample, 
census analysts decided that the relative degree of precision and 
detail should be somewhat greater for the shipper classes in the 
large tonnage divisions than for those in the small divisions. An 
average of about 195 plants per shipper class was established as 
the target in each of the four largest tonnage divisions, and an 
average of about 98 plants per shipper class was the target in the 
two smallest tonnage divisions. It also was decided that greater 
precision was needed for data on traffic flows from production 
areas than from the balance of the country. The probability of 
selecting a specific plant located in a production area was set at 
twice the probability of selecting an otherwise comparable plant 
not located in a production area. 

The next stage after selecting the plants involved the 
selection of a probability sample of bills of lading or other 
shipping papers at the company headquarters or individual 
plants. Several alternative standard plans were used, depending 
largely on the filing system used by the company. For example, 
in files organized by serial number, the procedure involved 
drawing every "nth" record, after starting from a number 
selected at random. In large chronological files, a two-stage 
design was used— a sample of dates and a sample of shipping 



This section is concerned specifically with the sample for the 
Shippers, Areas, and Commodity Series of reports. It does not deal with 
the samples used for the two byproduct reports mentioned in the 
introduction (reports on distribution of products by small manufacturing 
plants and by plants in printing and publishing— except newspapers and 
magazines). 

9 A production area is a selected major industrial center consisting of 
one or more standard metropolitan statistical areas. 



papers within those dates. Special methods were used for filing 
systems that could not be sampled readily by one of the 
standard plans. 

The sampling rate in each establishment was designed to give 
every intercity shipment a mathematically known chance of 
being selected and to yield data for about 100 to 200 shipments 
from each plant. On the average, about 140 bills of lading or 
other shipping papers were obtained per plant, including some 
papers which were found to involve local shipments. After 
excluding local shipments and other out-of-scope documents, 
the sample contained detailed information for slightly more 
than 1 .3 million shipments. 

Of the gross sample of about 13,000 establishments, ap- 
proximately 11,000 were found to be "in-scope" (currently in 
business and shipping a significant amount of products beyond 
the local area). Most of the 2,000 "out-of-scope" establishments 
were placed in this category because they served local customers 
almost exclusively, although some were declared out-of-scope 
for other reasons. The response of shippers was excellent. Over 
99 percent of all in-scope establishments provided data on 
shipment, and the quality of response was good. 

The 1967 Commodity Transportation Survey encompassed 
three major modifications of the prototype 1963 survey. First, 
the sample size was doubled in the major population centers as a 
means of improving the point-of-origin to point-of-destination 
commodity flow data. Secondly, two data-collection techniques 
were used rather than the single method employed in 1963. 
Finally, the scope of the survey was extended to include print- 
ing and publishing establishments (except those printing or 
publishing newspapers and periodicals). These establishments 
were not included in the 1963 survey. 

In 1963, it was found that plants with less than 20 em- 
ployees generated only 4 percent of the total tons of intercity 
shipments but included roughly two-thirds of the total manu- 
facturing establishments. It was decided, for the 1967 survey at 
least, that statistics showing the general commodity flow 
"profiles" would satisfy the primary needs for data for this 
segment of industry; those "profiles" could be produced from a 
simple report of the percentage distribution, by means of trans- 
port and mileage zones, for the total traffic at each plant. 
Reporting on an establishment (rather than a shipment) basis 
reduced the reporting effort and survey costs for the small- 
plants segment of the survey. 

The third modification for 1967, as mentioned above, was 
the extension of the survey to the printing and publishing 
industry (except newspapers and periodicals). Since little was 
known regarding the volume or characteristics of intercity ship- 
ments by this industry group, the 1967 survey obtained 
"profiles" through an establishment-distribution report similar 
to the one used for the small-plant sector. 

The 1967 results, achieved with the simple establishment- 
distribution questionnaires for small plants and for establish- 
ments of all sizes in the printing and publishing group, was 
excellent, considering the limited objective of those two 
projects. The objective was to obtain data on the transportation 
and distribution "profiles," as measured by the percentage 
distribution of traffic, by means of transport and by distance of 
shipment. Those profiles were supplemented by information 
regarding the availability of transport facilities and the relative 
volume of products exported. 



76 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Data Collection 

The data-collection phase of this survey commenced in March 
1968. A Census Bureau regional office representative usually 
visited an appropriate company official to discuss the survey. 
On the basis of that interview, the Bureau representative 
prepared simple step-by-step instructions for the company 
employees to follow in selecting a sample of their file of ship- 
ping papers. When an occasional situation did not fit a standard 
plan, a special sampling plan was prepared for the company and, 
if necessary, the Bureau representative provided special 
assistance. 

The standard set of relatively simple step-by-step instructions 
related to the selection of a systematic sample of about 100 to 
200 shipment papers from a file of bills of lading or other 
shipping papers. Essential information from the sampled papers 
was transcribed by hand, or the papers were photocopied. 
Company personnel usually entered the necessary traffic flow 
information on a transcription record (form TC-401), but in a 
few cases Census Bureau employees performed this task at the 
plant. The Bureau representative conducting the initial company 
visitation prepared an interview record (form TC-400) which, in 
addition to general comments about the interview, provided 
information about the firm's shipping documents and the 
sampling method to be used. 

Instructions for selecting the sample documents were 
contained in a separate form (TC-403). Elaborate instructions 
for conducting the interview and preparing the survey forms 
were issued in the Field Representative's Manual. In nearly all 
instances, however, the actual sampling and recording of 
detailed information was accomplished by company personnel. 
This was particularly true in the case of multi-plant firms 
(companies with more than one plant in the sample survey). In 
these cases, a "package" containing the instructions and forms 
was left at the company's home office for distribution to and 
collection from the various plants. 



a. The sampling rate used to select 100 to 200 documents 
for each sampled plant. Data from the sample docu- 
ments from each plant were expanded (multiplied) by 
the reciprocal of the sampling rate used to select the 
documents, to provide an estimate of tonnage shipped 
for that plant. 

b. The certainty or noncertainty code, which indicated 
whether all the plants in the class were selected 
automatically (those companies with a TE code of 9), 
or whether the plant was in the probability sample 

c. The sampling rate that applied to the selection of the 
plant, used to expand to tonnage estimates of the 
universe 

d. The geographic area code (GAC) denoting the geo- 
graphic division and State in which the plant was 
located 

e. The tonnage division and shipper class (TDSC) code 
denoting the strata in which the plant was placed prior 
to sampling 

f. The variance group number, a digit (1-20) randomly 
assigned to each shipment in the sample to allow more 
expeditious calculation of sampling variability of 
estimates 

g. Straight-line-miles from plant destination for each 
shipment 

3. Survey questionnaires and forms— The Census Bureau 
interviewer or the company completed the following 
forms: 

a. The Transcription Record for Shipments from Plants 

(form TC-401 )— These forms contain information 
extracted from sampled documents at the sampled 
plant. In addition to the census file number and the 
plant name and address, the following data were listed 
for each shipment: 



Data Processing 

The data processed in the Commodity Transportation Survey 
were derived from three basic sources: 

1. Census of manufactures tape— The first source is the basic 
computer tape of data collected in a complete enumera- 
tion of plants in the census of manufactures. Since this 
tape is the universe for the Commodity Transportation 
Survey sample, it was necessary to extract from the tape 
information available on the sampled plants as they were 
selected. The information extracted included: 

a. Name of the company and its address (city and State) 

b. The census file number— a 10-digit code identifying the 
company (first six digits unique) and plant within the 
company (the last four digits) on the universe list 

c. The SIC code for assignment to a Shipper Class 

d. The total employment (TE) code— indicating the size 
of the plant. All plants with a TE code of 9 (1,000 or 
more employees) were in the sample. 



(1 ) Control number and folder or drawer control (for 
the sampler's use only; not included in the 
ultimate computer tape record) 

(2) Date of the shipment (day and month) 

(3) Destination of the shipment (city and State or 
port of export) 

(4) Foreign destination if applicable 

(5) Type of transport 

(6) Commodity code 

(7) Commodity description (not made a part of the 1 
ultimate computer tape record) 

(8) Weight of total shipment in pounds 

(9) Packaging code 

(10) Number of shipments sampled for that plant 

b. Instructions for Selecting Shipping Documents (form 
TC-403)— This form was left with the Transcription 
Record at the plant and was completed there while the 
sample of shipments was being selected. It contained 
the following: 



2. Internally-calculated data— These include information 
necessary to expand the sample back to universe 
estimates, and the additional codes added for future use in 
sorting and grouping for specified requirements: 



(1) A source document code indicating whether the 
document from which the shipment information 
was extracted was a single shipping document or a 
summary record of several shipments 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



77 



(2) Information on type of sample (the design used 
to sample the shipment records at the plant, 
varying with the record-keeping system) 

The Interview Record (form TC-400)- Information to 
complete this form was obtained by the Census 
Bureau's interviewer at the company before he left the 
sampling "package" containing instructions and Trans- 
cription Records. The TC-400 form was used primarily 
for subsequent control and edit purposes. 



Check-in, Data Punching, and Editing 

Completed survey forms were returned by companies and 
Census Bureau interviewers to the regional offices for review 
and then to Bureau headquarters where the transportation 
census analysts maintained the check-in and control system. At 
this time, clerks edited the questionnaires for completeness, 
out-of-scope shipments, proper commodity codes, and correct 
expansion factors. 

The data were then prepared for punch. All information 
contained in the ultimate shipment record that was not entered 
and coded on a form TC-401 (Transcription Record for Ship- 
ments from Plants) was entered on a 15-item header card (form 
TC-407) for each plant in the survey. The header card contained 
only plant information common to each shipment in the 
attached transcription records; each line on the transcription 
record contained the data unique to that shipment. 

The header cards and attached transcription records were 
then mailed to the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division, 
where they were edited by clerks, primarily to eliminate some 
city or local shipments. In addition, any nongeographic codes 
still required were assigned. The data were then transferred to 
punchcards and transmitted to Bureau headquarters. 

After plant and shipment record tapes were created and ad- 
ditional editing and geographic coding were performed on the 
computer, the plant and shipment records were merged. 
Machine editing consisted primarily of a scan for impossible 
codes and missing items and eliminating records of about 
20,000 local shipments of 10 miles or less. While this matching 
edit was being accomplished, geographic codes were assigned by 
computer match to the alphabetic spellings of the origins and 
destinations of each shipment and "straight-line-miles" 
between origins and destinations were computed. This computa- 
tion was possible through the PICADAD subprogram previously 
developed by the Census Bureau. 10 A printout of errors was 
produced for correction and repunching of the record contain- 
ing the error. 

The remaining computer processing involved tabulations, 
variance computations, and a check for disclosure on three 
major sorts to provide tabulations for publication on (1 ) shipper 
groups (a series of 24 reports), (2) production areas (a series of 
25 reports), (3) States (a series of 20 reports), and (4) com- 
modities (with the greatest detail possible within variability and 
disclosure constraints). 



10 This subprogram allowed the computers to calculate the length of 
haul in terms of straight-line miles between origins and destinations and, 
if desired, indicate the direction of flow. A research project was under- 
taken in 1963 to determine general relationships between straight-line 
distance and railroad short-line miles, or highway direct-route miles, and 
appropriate adjustments were made to the data on this basis. 



The final machine processing project was a two-part imputa- 
tion program. The analytical and tabulation program for the 
Commodity Transportation Survey consisted, then, of the 
following requirements. 



Edit Program— A plant record and the individual shipment 
records within plant were to be edited. 

The data elements of the plant record were plant location 
and identification, shipper group, SIC code, employment size, 
plant expansion factor, type of source document (for example, 
an invoice), and type of sample. The data elements of the ship- 
ment record were weight of shipment, mode of transportation, 
origin and destination, commodity code, and document 
number. 

If, during the machine edit of the plant record, an error was 
found in the company identification, SIC code, plant expansion 
factor, within-plant expansion factor, or plant location, the 
whole plant, with all its shipment records, was eliminated from 
the data file and was reviewed before recycling. Different per- 
centages of errors were permitted in the shipment records, 
depending upon the total number of shipments per plant. If this 
percentage was exceeded, the whole plant was rejected from the 
data file and reviewed. 



Imputation Program— A machine imputation process adjusted 
shipment records that had failed the edit but were permitted to 
continue in the flow of processing. The imputation process was 
based on using the greatest frequency of modes of transporta- 
tion, commodity, and destination for all shipment records 
within a plant. 

Two distinct types of imputations were performed. First, 
there was an item computation within the shipment record, 
followed by an imputation of the entire plant record. 

The first type of imputation included the items on means of 
transport, commodities, straight-line-miles, and weight of ship- 
ment. This was accomplished by using a decision table with 
seven different combinations of missing and given data for these 
items. The table, constructed through known correlations of the 
items, was used after the computation of straight-line miles 
and after the computer edit corrections had been made but 
before the initial sort and tabulation by shipper class. 

The second phase, which in effect involved an imputation for 
the entire plant, was accomplished while the data were in 
shipper group sort and in summary records form. It was 
included in the "correction routines" program, which involved 
adjusting plant and within-plant expansions as well as correcting 
erroneous assignments to shipper classes. This was accomplished 
by adjusting the overall plant expansion to reflect the number 
of in-scope sampled plants (1) for which records were not 
available, and (2) for those companies refusing to supply data. 
The number of plants for which imputations of this type were 
made was less than 6 percent of the total sampled. Due to the 
sample design and the desire to improve accuracy, an adjusted 
plant expansion was computed for each tonnage division shipper 
class, geographic area code, and total employment summary for 
which there was a missing plant record in either of the two 
situations requiring imputation. The complete corrected ship- 
ment records were then ready for tabulating, resorting, and 
retabulating to provide published data formats. 



78 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Sampling Variability— The "20 random group" method (the 
same as that used for the Truck Inventory and Use Survey) was 
employed. A variance program was associated with each of the 
three basic sorts for a publication series. Since the reports in the 
Shipper Group Series were to be tabulated first, a printout of 
assigned variance group numbers on each shipper class's ship- 
ments was made. A manual variance computation of a few 
items, as well as a visual check of the distribution of tonnage 
assignments to variance groups, was performed by the trans- 
portation census analysts at this time. Variance was computed 
on estimated tons only (not ton-miles). Variance group number 
assignments were made after the plant record and shipment 
record were combined to form a complete basic shipment 
record tape. Plants not definitely in the sample ("noncertainty 
plants") and shipments for each plant definitely in the sample 
("certainty plants") were eligible for assignment of a digit from 
1 to 20, on a random basis. Variance was then calculated for 
each of the 20 groups. 

Disclosure Analysis— A data cell was withheld from publication 
to avoid disclosure of information for individual companies if 
the largest two companies accounted for a major portion of the 
cell total or if there were less than three companies in a cell. A 
feature permitting additional analysis was the recording of the 
contribution made by the eight largest companies to the table's 
data cells. 

Computers were used to analyze the detailed reports on tons 
shipped to ascertain the following information, in accordance 
with the disclosure rules: 

1. Which (if any) of the 24 shipper groups and 86 shipper 
classes could not be shown without possibly revealing 
activities of individual plants or companies. A test for 
possible disclosure also was made for small, medium, and 
large plant-size classes within each of the shipper groups 
and classes. 

2. For United States totals, which Transportation Com- 
modity Classification commodities could be shown and 
which had to be combined with others to avoid dis- 
closures. These tests were made at the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 
5-digit levels. Combinations (to avoid disclosure) were 
made by "collapsing upward" when necessary. For 
example, a 5-digit commodity was combined with its 
4-digit class (if necessary) and that 4-digit class (if neces- 
sary) was combined with its 3-digit group, etc. 

3. For areas of origin, disclosure tests similar to the test 
described above were conducted for each TCC com- 
modity. The following areas of origin were tested: 

a. Each production area (25 separate areas) 

b. Each standard metropolitan statistical area (ap- 
proximately 235 such areas) 

c. Each geographic division (9 divisions) 

d. Each State (except Hawaii and Alaska, which were not 
within the scope of the areas of origin in the survey) 



Tabulations— The following tabulations were prepared: 
1. Shipper Series 

The data for the reports on shippers are estimates of tons 



and ton-miles originated by each shipper group and class 
that could be shown — 

a. By distance and means of transport 

b. By geographic division of origin and of destination, and 
by means of transport 

c. By geographic division of origin and of destination: 

(1 ) By all means of transport combined 

(2) By rail 

(3) By highway 

(4) By air 

(5) By water 

d. By plant-size class: 

(1) By means of transport 

(2) By mileage block 

e. By size of shipment and means of transport 

f. By mileage block, size of shipment, and transport 

Tabulations of data on availability of shipping facilities 
and plant size, by percent of total number of plants— not 
tons or ton-miles— are also presented in the reports. 



2. Commodity Series 

a. Total tons and ton-miles originated in the United 
States as a whole, classified by each TCC level (2-, 3-, 
4-, and 5-digit) that could be shown, by— 

(1) Means of transport 

(2) Mileage shipped 

(3) Weight of shipment 

b. Tons and ton-miles for selected 3-digit TCC com- 
modities were tabulated as follows: 

(1) Origin division, mileage block, and means of 
transport 

(2) Origin division, by destination division 

(3) Mileage block, weight block, and means of trans- 
port 

(4) Mileage block, type of commodity (liquid bulk, 
dry bulk, and other), and means of transport 

3. Area Series 

a. Tons and ton-miles from each origin production area- 

(1) By 2-digit TCC commodity and destination 
division 

(2) By TCC commodity at each level, by— 

(a) Transport 

(b) Mileage block 

(c) Destination production area 

b. Tons and ton-miles for selected TCC commodities by 
means of transport— 

(1 ) From selected origin production areas 

(a) To destination divisions 

(b) To destination production areas 

(c) By mileage block 

(2) From selected origin States 

(a) To destination divisions 

(b) By mileage block 

(3) From selected origin divisions 

(a) To destination divisions 

(b) By mileage block 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



79 



Survey Calendar 



Operation 



Completion date 



Initial specifications prepared for selecting sample May 1967 

Computer program test for selecting sample completed . November 1967 

Budget Bureau approval of questionnaires received .... August 1967 

Multiunit labels printed, TC^OO forms addressed January 1968 

Sample selected December 1 967 

Single-unit labels printed, and TC-400 and TC-411 

forms addressed January 1 968 

Field interviews conducted December 1968 

Check-in January 1 969 

Prepunch processing specifications prepared March 1968 

Computer specifications prepared: 

1 . Edit June 1 968 

2. Imputation: 

(a) Item November 1968 

(b) Adjusted plan extension April 1969 

3. Final shipper tabulation March 1968 

4. Commodity tabulation March 1968 

5. Production area tabulation March 1968 

6. Variances for all tabulations June 1968 

Clerical editing and coding performed March 1969 

Pretabulation processing started: 

1 . Data edit March 1 969 

2. Imputation (item) April 1969 

Preliminary shipper tabulations completed June 1969 

Final tabulations completed: 

1 . Production area series December 1 969 

2. Commodity December 1 969 

3. Shipper group October 1 969 

First reports published: 

1 . Area series: 

(a) Production areas February 1970 

(b) States March 1 970 

2. Shipper group report October 1 969 

3. Commodity group (two parts). June 1970 

Bound volume (3 parts) December 1970- 

January 1971 

"Under 20" survey report July 1970 

Survey of domestic origins of exports in Commodity 

Transportation Survey sample July 1970 

Printing and publishing industry report July 1970 



PUBLICATION PROGRAM 

National Travel Survey 

A United States and regional summary of national travel data 
was released in paperback in June 1969. A single clothbound 
volume on the National Travel Survey, entitled 1967 Census of 
Transporation, Volume I, National Travel Survey, was published 
in late 1970. This final published volume includes all tables 
published in the paperback edition, together with additions to 
and corrections of text and tables. Also included in the cloth- 
bound final volume is an evaluation of the National Travel 
Survey, including comparisons of the 1957, 1963, and 1967 
surveys. 



Commodity Transportation Survey 

The first series of Commodity Transportation Survey publica- 
tions includes traffic-flow data for shipper groups or classes. 
Preliminary releases were issued for each of the 24 shipper 
groups between October 1969 and January 1970. 



The second series presented traffic flow from "production 
areas" and 20 selected States. In an effort to pinpoint origin and 
destination data, a special series of 25 production areas was 
defined specifically for experimental use in the 1963 Census of 
Transportation surveys, and this project was continued in the 
1967 census. Some production areas were represented by a 
single SMSA (such as New York) because of size. Some smaller 
production areas were represented by a single SMSA (such as 
Atlanta) because other metropolitan areas were not close 
enough to form a homogeneous complex. Whenever feasible, 
two or more adjacent SMSA's were combined to form a 
production area of sufficient size to support useful traffic data 
from the Commodity Transportation Survey. 

The first report in the Production Area series was published 
in February 1970, and the series was completed in May 1970. 
The series of 20 State reports was issued between April 1970 
and May 1970. 

In early 1971 the clothbound report, consolidating all final 
data from this survey, was issued as 1967 Census of Transporta- 
tion, Volume III, Commodity Transportation Survey. The 

report was issued in two volumes: (1) Commodity Groups (parts 
1 and 2); and (2) Shipper Groups and Production Areas (parts 3 
and 4). 



Truck Inventory and Use Survey 

Data on characteristics and use of private and commercial trucks 
were published in a series of paperback reports, one for each of 
the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the nine geographic 
divisions, and the United States as a whole. The reports for the 
nine geographic divisions include a summarization of State data 
and a supplemental section on pickup and panel trucks. The 
national report summarizes selected data from State and 
divisional reports and presents substantially more detail, 
especially with respect to distributions by year model and fuel. 
The first of the advance State reports was released in May 1968 
and the series was completed in June 1969 with the issuance of 
the U.S. Summary. 

Reports published in the advance series were assembled in a 
single clothbound volume, 1967 Census of Transportation, 
Volume II, Truck Inventory and Use Survey. 



PUBLICITY 

As the transportation census publications were issued, news 
releases describing the reports and copies of the reports them- 
selves were distributed to various news media. The kinds of 
news media varied with the subjects covered by the reports. 

For the National Travel Survey, news releases were provided 
to the wire news services and to trade publications serving 
hotels, motels, the automotive industry, gasoline service 
stations, and public carriers. For the Truck Inventory and Use 
Survey, releases were sent to business editors of daily news- 
papers in each State and to trade publications serving the truck- 
ing industry. 

News releases for the Commodity Transportation Survey 
were provided to business editors in the major cities within each 
production area, to trade publications serving the various modes 
of transportation, and to trade publications serving each of the 
commodity groups. 



80 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FIGURE 13. Selected Production Areas 



SELECTED PRODUCTION AREAS 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



Bureau of the Census 



DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCTION AREAS 



1. Boston, Mass.; Worcester, Mass.; Providence-Pawtucket- 
Warwick, R.I. -Mass.; Brockton, Mass.; Lawrence-Haverhill, 
Mass.-N.H.; and Lowell, Mass. 

2. Hartford, Conn.; New Britain, Conn.; Meriden, Conn.; 
Waterbury, Conn.; New Haven, Conn.; Bridgeport, Conn.; 
Norwalk, Conn.; Stamford, Conn.; Springfield-Chicopee- 
Holyoke, Mass. -Conn. 

3. New York, N.Y. 

4. Newark, N.J.; Jersey City, N.J.; Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, 
N.J.; and Middlesex and Somerset counties, N.J. 

5. Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.; Wilmington, Del. -N.J. -Md.; Trenton, 
N.J. 

6. Baltimore, Md. 

7. Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa.-N.J.; and Reading, Pa. 

8. Harrisburg, Pa.; Lancaster, Pa.; and York, Pa. 

9. Syracuse, N.Y.; Utica-Rome, N.Y.; and Albany- 
Schenectady-Troy, N.Y. 

10. Buffalo, N.Y.;and Rochester, N.Y. 

1 1 . Cleveland, Ohio; Akron, Ohio; Canton, Ohio; Lorain-Elyria, 
Ohio; Youngstown-Warren, Ohio; and Erie, Pa. 

12. Pittsburgh, Pa.; Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W.Va.; and 
Wheeling, W.Va.-Ohio. 



13. Detroit, Mich.; Flint, Mich.; Toledo, Ohio-Mich.; and Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 

14. Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.-lnd.; Dayton, Ohio; Hamilton- 
Middletown, Ohio; Springfield, Ohio. 

15. Chicago, III.; and Gary-Hammond-East Chicago, Ind. 

16. Milwaukee, Wis.; Kenosha, Wis.; and Racine, Wis. 

17. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 

18. St. Louis, Mo.-lll. 

19. Atlanta, Ga. 

20. Dallas, Tex.; and Forth Worth, Tex. 

21. Houston, Tex.; Beaumont-Port Arthur, Tex.; and 
Galveston-Texas City, Tex. 

22. Denver, Colo. 

23. Seattle- Everett, Wash.; and Tacoma, Wash. 

24. San Francisco-Oakland, Calif.; Vallejo-Napa, Calif.; and San 
Jose, Calif. 

25. Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif.; Anaheim-Santa Ana- 
Garden Grove, Calif.; and San Bernardino-Riverside- 
Ontario, Calif. 

30. All SMSA's not included in the 25 production areas above. 

50. All points or places located outside of SMSA's. 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



81 



EXHIBIT 



Classification of Manufacturing Establishments into Shipper 
Groups 



The classification into shipper groups was designed to divide the 
universe of manufacturing establishments into a limited number 
of more or less closely related classes of industrial activity of 
about equal size. The 24 groups are comparable to the major 
manufacturing components in the Federal Reserve Board's 



Index of Industrial Activity. 

Each of the 24 shipper groups is presented in a separate 
report in the Shipper Group Series of the Commodity Trans- 
portation Survey. The Table below identifies each group. 



Shipper 

group 

number 



Shipper group title 



1 Meat and dairy products 

2 Canned and frozen foods and other food products, except meat and dairy products 

3 Candy, beverages, and tobacco products' 

4 Basic textiles and leather products 

5 Apparel and related products 

6 Paper and allied products 

7 Basic chemicals, plastics materials, synthetic resins, rubber, and fibers 

8 Drugs, paints, and other chemical products 

9 Petroleum and coal products 

10 Rubber and plastics products 

1 1 Lumber and wood products, except furniture 

12 Furniture, fixtures, and miscellaneous manufactured products 

1 3 Stone, clay, and glass products 

14 Primary iron and steel products 

15 Primary nonferrous metal products 

16 Fabricated metal products, except metal cans and miscellaneous 

17 Metal cans and miscellaneous fabricated metal products 

18 Industrial machinery, except electrical 



19 Machinery, except electrical and industrial 

20 Communications products and parts 

21 Electrical products and supplies 

22 Motor vehicles and equipment 

23 Transportation equipment, except motor vehicles 

24 Instruments, photographic equipment, watches, and clocks 



82 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



EXHIBIT 

Description of 3-Digit TCC Groups 



Part 3 of the Commodity Transportation Survey presents data 
for shipments of commodities based on the Transportation 



Commodity Classification (TCC). Data are shown for 80 
selected classes, as follows: 



TCC TCC 

group Commodity description group 

201 Meat poultry, and small game; fresh, chilled, or frozen 324 

202 Dairy products 325 

203 Canned and preserved fruits, vegetables, and seafoods 326 

204 Grain mill products 327 

206 Sugar, beet, and cane 329 

207 Confectionery and related products 

208 Beverages and flavoring extracts 331 

209 Miscellaneous food preparations and kindred products 332 

221 Cotton broadwoven fabrics 333 

222 Man-made fiber and silk broadwoven fabrics 

227 Carpets, rugs, and mats, textile 335 

228 Yarn and thread (cotton, wool, silk, and man-made 336 

fiber) 339 

229 Miscellaneous basic textiles 341 
231 Men's, youths', and boys' clothing 342 
233 Women's, misses', girls', and infants' clothing 343 
239 Miscellaneous fabricated textile products 

242 Lumber and dimension stock and miscellaneous saw- 344 

mill and planing mill products 345 

243 Millwork and prefabricated wood products, including 

plywood and veneer 346 

249 Miscellaneous wood products 348 

251 Household and office furniture 349 

262 Paper (except building paper) 351 

263 Paperboard, fiberboard, and pulpboard (except insulat- 352 

ing board) 353 

264 Converted paper and paperboard products (except 

containers and boxes) 354 

265 Containers, boxes and related products, paperboard, 355 

fiberboard, and pulpboard 

281 Industrial chemicals 356 

282 Plastic materials and plasticizers, synthetic resins, 357 

rubbers, and fibers 358 

283 Drugs (biological products, medicinal chemicals, botan- 359 

ical products, and pharmaceutical preparations) 361 

284 Soap and detergents, cleaning preparations, perfumes, 362 

cosmetics, and other toilet preparations 363 

285 Paints, varnishes, lacquers, enamels, and allied products 364 
287 Agricultural chemicals 365 
289 Miscellaneous chemical products 

291 Products of petroleum refining 366 

295 Paving and roofing materials 367 

301 Tires and inner tubes 369 

306 Miscellaneous fabricated rubber products 

307 Miscellaneous plastic products 371 
314 Footwear (except rubber) 37? 
316 Luggage and handbags (all materials), and other 379 

personal leather goods 382 

322 Glass and glassware, pressed and blown 386 



Commodity description 

Hydraulic cement 

Structural clay products 

Pottery and related products 

Concrete, gypsum, plaster, and plaster products 

Abrasives, asbestos, and miscellaneous nonmetallic 
mineral products 

Steel works and rolling mill products 

Iron and steel castings 

Nonferrous metals primary smelter products (slab, 
ingot, pig, etc., and residues) 

Nonferrous metal basic shapes 

Nonferrous and nonferrous base alloy castings 

Miscellaneous primary metal products 

Metal cans 

Cutlery, hand tools, and general hardware 

Plumbing fixtures and heating apparatus (except 
electric) 

Structural and miscellaneous metal products 

Bolts, nuts, screws, rivets, washers, and other industrial 
fasteners 

Metal stampings 

Miscellaneous fabricated wire products 

Miscellaneous fabricated metal products 

Engines and turbines 

Farm machinery and equipment 

Construction, mining, and materials handling machin- 
ery and equipment 

Metalworking machinery and equipment 

Special industry machinery (except metalworking 
machinery) 

General industrial machinery and equipment 

Office, computing, and accounting machines 

Service industry machines 

Miscellaneous machinery and parts (except electrical) 

Electrical transmission and distribution equipment 

Electrical industrial apparatus 

Household appliances 

Electric lighting and wiring equipment 

Radio and television receiving sets (except communica- 
tion types), phonographs, and phonograph records 

Communication equipment 

Electronic components or accessories 

Miscellaneous electrical machinery, equipment, and 
supplies 

Motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Miscellaneous transportation equipment 

Measuring, controlling, and indicating instruments 

Photographic equipment and supplies 



CHAPTER 



13 



CENSUS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 



GENERAL 

The Census Bureau's experience in collecting statistics on 
fisheries dates back to the Tenth Decennial Census (1880). Data 
collected in this census formed the basis for a series of reports 
on the history and current conditions of the fishing industry. 
The reports of the Eleventh Decennial Census (1890) also 
included fishery statistics, most of the data applying to 1889. In 
1909, the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Fisheries (both then 
agencies of the U.S. Department of Commerce and Labor) 
cooperated in conducting a special census of fisheries for the 
year 1908. From 1909 to 1963, there were no formal censuses 
of fisheries. During these years, the Bureau of Fisheries (which 
was transferred to the Department of the Interior in 1939 and 
redesignated the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries in 1956), x 
compiled and published selected statistics on this subject, in 
part by combining data collected by the various State fishing 
authorities. 

In June 1963, the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries recom- 
mended that the 1963 Economic Censuses include a census of 
commercial fisheries. This recommendation was accepted, and 
the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries 
worked in close cooperation to complete the project. The 
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries helped defray the cost of 
developing the questionnaire, provided clerks to edit the 
returns, and contributed an estimated 15 man-months of profes- 
sional services to planning and analytical work. 

In the 1963 Census of Commercial Fisheries, statistics were 
collected on the number of commercial fishing vessel operators; 
employment and gross receipts; fishing regions, primary catch, 
and fishing gear; and various vessel characteristics. The Bureau 
of Commercial Fisheries found these data invaluable in bench- 
marking its statistics and in evaluating its interim reports. Other 
users of the data also commented favorably and agreed that the 
census of commercial fisheries helped satisfy the growing need 
for basic statistics to measure the economic characteristics of 
the fishing industry. The favorable reaction led to a decision to 
include commercial fisheries in the 1967 Economic Censuses. 



1 The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries' activities were returned to the 
Department of Commerce in October 1970; its activities were combined 
with those of the Marine Game Fish Research Program to create a new 
agency, the National Marine Fisheries Service. The National Marine 
Fisheries Service is part of the newly created National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration in the Department of Commerce. 



PLANNING THE CENSUS 

Developing and Testing the Questionnaire 

Officials of the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Commercial 
Fisheries met several times to discuss the 1967 census question- 
naire. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries field representatives 
tested the proposed questionnaire by interviewing fishing vessel 
operators at ports in New Orleans, La.; Gloucester, Mass.; Los 
Angeles, Calif.; Seattle, Wash.; and Kodiak, Alaska. As a result 
of these interviews, a few questions were modified, but no 
serious reporting problems were discovered. The Census Bureau 
conducted an independent field test in Hampton, Va., primarily 
to evaluate respondents' ability to answer the new questions 
added for 1967; generally favorable results were reported. 

The 1967 questionnaire, form FC-09A, closely resembled its 
1963 counterpart. (The 1967 questionnaire is reproduced in 
appendix G.) One major modification was that the inquiry on 
original cost of vessel and engine was omitted from the 1967 
questionnaire because almost 25 percent of the 1963 
respondents were unable to provide this information, even after 
extensive followup correspondence. Other changes are sum- 
marized as follows: 

1. Identification items— Minor wording changes were 
required because the 1967 questionnaire reported the 
activities of a vessel instead of an establishment, as in 
1963. For example, item 1 on the 1963 questionnaire was 
"name and physical location of fishing establishment," 
whereas item 1 on the 1967 questionnaire was "vessel 
name and other identification." 

2. Question on operator of vessel— If the owner did not 
actually operate the vessel in 1967, he was asked to give 
the name and address of the persons (captain or other 
person in charge of the vessel) who did operate it, and the 
dates of operation. 

3. Employment and payroll item— The 1963 question on 
"payments to all other employees not on boats and 
vessels, such as office workers, unloaders, etc." was 
dropped because it was not applicable to a questionnaire 
completed by a vessel operator. 

4. Gross receipts item— The 1967 question on value of gross 
receipts for catch sold was divided into three sub- 
categories (edible finfish, edible shellfish, and nonfood 
fish). This information was readily available in most 
operators' records, and the new breakdown provided data 
more closely comparable to Bureau of Commercial 

83 



84 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Fisheries statistics. The 1963 question on receipts "from 
activities other than use of boats and vessels" was dropped 
because it was not applicable to a vessel report. 

5. Question on value of catch sold, by area and port— The 
1963 breakdown was by region and State, but the 1967 
breakdown was by area and specific port. This change was 
recommended by the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries 
because it matched its catch statistics on a specific port 
basis. 

6. Operating cost inquiry— This question was added for 1967 
at the request of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. 

7. Vessel description item— The questions on hull construc- 
tion and electronic equipment were added for 1967. As 
previously mentioned, the inquiry on cost of vessel and 
engine was dropped. 

8. Inquiry on utilization of vessel time— This question was 
also added at the request of the Bureau of Commercial 
Fisheries. 



Developing the Mailing List 

Experiences in the 1963 Census of Commercial Fisheries 
indicated that a more serviceable' mailing list was needed for 
1967. The 1963 list was based on the Social Security Adminis- 
tration's "employer master file" of fishing establishments with 
one or more paid employees. However, this list was revealed to 
be seriously deficient; it included only about 5,000 of the 
12,000 commercial fishing vessels registered by the U.S. Coast 
Guard, and the estimated number of nonemployers was in- 
sufficient to account for a difference of this magnitude. It was 
therefore necessary to conduct a supplementary survey to 
secure data for the approximately 7,000 missed vessels. 

The mailing list for the 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries 
was prepared jointly by the Coast Guard and the Bureau of 
Commercial Fisheries. The Coast Guard developed the initial 
mailing list of fishing vessels based on its files, which are used to 
prepare the Bureau of Customs' publication. Merchant Vessels 
of the United States. This list of fishing vessels, obtained from 
the master file of all merchant vessels, contained names and 
addresses of owners of all vessels classified in one of the four 
fishing categories in that file (cod fishing; whale fishing; fishing, 
except cod and whale; and oystering). 

The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries then compared the 
Coast Guard's list with its records of vessels engaged in com- 
mercial fishing during 1967 and added names of vessels ap- 
pearing in its records but not on the Coast Guard's list. The 
complete list of fishing vessels was forwarded to the Census 
Bureau for the mailing of census questionnaires. 



were asked to complete the questionnaire and return it to 
Census Bureau headquarters by April 30, using the postage-free 
return envelope included in the mailing package. 

Three followups were conducted to remind nonrespondents 
of their legal reporting requirements. A postcard was used for 
the first followup (May 10), and letters for the second and third 
followups (May 27 and June 10). 

Clerks at Census Bureau headquarters checked in the 
returned questionnaires and assigned geographic area codes. The 
returns were edited and the editing was verified in the subject- 
matter division responsible for the census (the Industry 
Division). Edited questionnaires were forwarded on a flow basis 
to a punch unit, where data were transcribed to punchcards and 
prepared for computer tabulation. The editing, punching, and 
data tabulations were completed by mid-December 1968. 



ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS DATA 

Plans for the 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries provided for 
the extraction of some basic information (gross receipts and 
industry classification) for nonemployers from the adminis- 
trative records of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social 
Security Administration (SSA). (As in the 1963 census, part- 
time and full-time fishermen without paid employees were not 
asked to complete questionnaires.) IRS and SSA records had 
been used in the 1963 census as a source of information for 
about 14,000 nonemployers. However, when the Census Bureau 
attempted to use a similar system for 1967, it encountered 
serious classification problems. 

The number of 1967 nonemployers was more than double 
the 1963 total. Analysts believe that the bulk of this increase 
resulted from the inclusion of sport fishing craft and fish 
hatcheries, farms, and preserves in the commercial fishing clas- 
sification in the 1967 administrative records file. The Standard 
Industrial Classification (SIC) Manual places sport fishing craft 
in SIC Industry 7949 (Amusement and Recreation Services, Not 
Elsewhere Classified), and fish hatcheries, farms, and preserves 
in SIC Industry 0989 (Fish Hatcheries, Farms, and Preserves). It 
appears that, for 1967, data for both of these activities were 
incorrectly included with the data for the commercial fishing 
industries: SIC Industries 912 (Finfish), 913 (Shellfish), 914 
(Whale Products), and 919 (Miscellaneous Marine Products). 

This misclassification is understandable in view of the small 
size of the reporting units, many of which simply indicated their 
activities as fishing. However, because of these classification 
problems, the 1967 administrative records data were not 
comparable with 1963 statistics, and subject-matter specialists 
decided not to publish the 1967 data for nonemployers. 



THE MAIL CANVASS 

Detailed procedures for mailing, checking in, and editing ques- 
tionnaires and following up nonrespondents were developed by 
Census Bureau systems analysts. Beginning in late March 1968, 
labels were prepared and affixed to questionnaires, and mailing 
packages were prepared and verified. The original mailout of 
approximately 15,000 questionnaires (not counting those later 
mailed to vessel operators who were reported on owners' 
questionnaires) was completed on April 3, 1968. Respondents 



REVIEWING AND PUBLISHING DATA 

All tabulations prepared from data collected in the 1967 Census 
of Commercial Fisheries were carefully reviewed by subject- 
matter specialists, who investigated inconsistencies and cor- 
rected errors in the statistics. A preliminary report containing 
two basic tables was published in August 1970, and the final 
report, consisting of eight tables, was issued in October 1970. 
(See figure 14, p. 85., for the column headings of tables in the 
final report.) 



CENSUS OF FISHERIES 



85 



FIGURE 14. Column Headings of Tables: 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries 



table i Number of Commercial Fishing Vessel Operators and 
Gross Receipts, by Geographic Divisions and States: 1967 
and 1963 





1967 


1963 


Geographic division and 
State of home port 


Number 


Gross 
receipts 

($1,000) 


Number 


Gross 
receipts 

($1,000) 













Table 2. Selected Statistics for Commercial Fishing Vessel Operators by Primary Catch and Region and 

Home Port: 1967 and 1963 





1967 






Vessel 
operators 

(number) 


Vessels 
operated 

(number) 


Employees 


Operating 

cost, 

excluding 

payroll 

($1,000) 


Gross 
receipts 

($1,000) 


1963 

gross 


n imary catch, fishing region , and home port of operation 


Average 
for year 

(number) 


Payroll 
($1,000) 


receipts 
($1,000) 



















table 3. Detailed Statistics for Commercial Fishing Vessel Operators by 

Primary Catch: 1967 



Item 



1/ 



Commercial 
fishing 

operators, 
total 



Operators with primary 
catch of- 



Finfish 



All other 
marine 
products 



table 4 Selected Statistics for Commercial Fishing Vessel Operators, by Employment Size of Operator 

and Primary Catch: 1967 


Primary catch and item 


Commercial 

fishing 

operators, 

total 


Operators with an average of- 


Less than 
5 employees 


5 to 9 
employees 


10 to 19 
employees 


20 to 49 
employees 


50 to 99 
employees 


100 
employees 
and over 


V 

















1 . Includes Operators by legal form of organization, Operators by number of vessels operated. Employment by month. Payroll, Operating cost other than 
payroll, and Gross receipts. 



86 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FIGURE 14. Column Headings of Tables: 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries— Continued 



table 5 Number of Commercial Fishing Vessels, by Year Built and Size: 

1967 





Commercial 

fishing 

vessels, 

total 


Year built 


Length of vessel 


Prior 
to 1930 


1930 to 
1939 


1940 to 
1949 


1950 to 
1959 


Since 
1960 

















( 

table 6. Number of Commercial Fishing Vessels, by Fishing Region and Vessel Characteristics: 


1967 


Item 

V 


Commercial 

fishing 

vessels, 

total 


Fishing region 


Great 
Lakes 


Mississippi 
River 


New 
England 


Middle 
Atlantic 


Chesapeake 


South 
Atlantic 


Gulf 


Pacific 


Other U.S. 

regions 

J 



f 

table 7 Number of Commercial Fishing 


Vessel 


s, by Fishing Region and Utilization of Time: 1967 


Utilization of time 1/ 


United 
States, 
total 


Fishing region 


Great 
Lakes 


Mississippi 
River 


New 
England 


Middle 
Atlantic 


Chesapeake 


South 
Atlantic 


Gulf 


Pacific 


Other U.S. 
regions 


V 










: 










j 



table 8. Commercial Fishing Vessel Operators' Receipts for Catch Sold, by Fishing Regioi 

Port of Vessel and of Sale of Catch: 1967 

(Thousands of dollars) 


i and Home ^ 


Fishing region snd home port of vessel 

V 


United 

States, 

total 


Fishing region and port of sale of catch 


Great 
Lakes 


Mississippi 
River 


New England 


Total 


Maine 


Massachusetts 


Point 

Judith, 

R.I. 


Other 

New 

England 

ports 

J 


Portland 


Rockland 


Boston 


Gloucester 


New 
Bedford 



1. Includes Number of vessels, Number of vessels reporting utilization. Number of vessel-days reported (total; commercial fishing; layovers and holidays; 
in port, bad weather; laid up for repairs, use other than fishing). Average number of days each vessel engaged in: commercial fishing; layovers and 
holidays; in port, bad weather; laid up for repairs; use other than fishing. 



Appendixes 



Page 

Appendix A. Key Personnel 88 

B. Consultation and Meetings on the Census Inquiries 93 

C. Chronology of Major Events 108 

D. Differences Between the 1967 and 1963 Standard Industrial 

Classification 109 

E. Definitions and Descriptions of Geographic Areas Covered 112 

F. List of Questionnaires 122 

G. Facsimiles of Selected Questionnaires 129 

H. Published Census Reports 301 



87 



Appendix A 



KEY PERSONNEL 



(Persons and positions are listed as of the period of major economic censuses activity, 1967 to 1970) 



OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR 

George Hay Brown, Director from Sept. 1969 

A. Ross Eckler, Director to Sept. 1969 

Robert F. Drury, Deputy Director from July 1967; 

Assistant Director for Operations to July 1967 
V. Lance Tarrance, Jr., Special Assistant to the Director 
John J. Casserly, Special Assistant to the Director (Public 

Affairs) 
Mathew E. Erickson, Legal Advisor 
William I. Merkin, Associate Director for Administration 
Walter F. Ryan, Associate Director for Economic Fields from 

Sept. 1968 
Maxwell R. Conklin, Associate Director for Economic Fields to 
Sept. 1 968 
Dino S. Villa, Deputy Associate Director (Economic Surveys) 

from May 1970 
Milton Eisen, Deputy Associate Director (Economic Statistics 

and Analysis) from May 1970 
Arthur W. Horowitz, Economic Censuses Coordinator 
Joseph F. Daly, Associate Director for Research and Develop- 
ment from Nov. 1968 
Morris H. Hansen, Associate Director for Research and Develop- 
ment to Nov. 1968 
William N. Hurwitz, Chief Mathematical and Statistical 

Advisor to Mar. 1969 
Benjamin J. Tepping, Director, Center for Research in Meas- 
urement Methods 
James L. McPherson, Special Assistant for Experimental 

Procedures to May 1 969 
Robert B. Voight, Special Assistant for Research on Use of 
Data 
John W.H. Spencer, Associate Director for Data Systems 

Herman Fasteau, Special Assistant 
Edwin D. Goldfield, Assistant Director for Program Develop- 
ment from May 1970; 
Assistant Director for Statistical Informa- 
tion to May 1970; 1 

Assistant Director for Program Planning and 
Evaluation, June 1969 to May 1970 1 
Julius Shiskin, Assistant Director for Program Planning and 
Evaluation to June 1 969 1 



'The activities of the Assistant Director for Statistical Information 
and the Assistant Director for Program Planning and Evaluation were 
consolidated in May 1970 and assigned to one position redesignated as 
Assistant Director for Program Development. 

88 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND PUBLICATIONS 
SERVICES DIVISION 

Cecil B. Matthews, Chief 

Robert Makoff , Special Assistant for Censuses 

Raymond J. Koski, Assistant to Division Chief for Publications 

from Apr. 1970 
Lloyd E. Brelsford, Assistant to Division Chief for General 

Services from Aug. 1969 

Printing and Distribution Branch 

John F. Lanham, Jr., Chief from Nov. 1968, 

Assistant Chief to Nov. 1968 
Robert H. Brooks, Chief to Nov. 1968 

Publications Planning Branch 

Gerald A. Mann, Acting Chief from Apr. 1970 
Raymond J. Koski, Chief to Apr. 1970 
Francis W. Bresnahan, Editor 
Geraldine C. Censky, Editor 
Julia H. Moring, Editor 

Records and Facilities Branch 

S. F. Timothy Mullen, Chief from July 1969 

Eldon W. Grace, Acting Chief from Dec. 1968 to June 1969 

Warren L. Schriver, Chief to Dec. 1968 

BUDGET AND FINANCE DIVISION 

William E. Stiver, Chief 

Evelyn M. Hollabaugh, Senior Budget Analyst (Economic 

Areas) 
Ruth E. Marshall, Budget Analyst 

BUSINESS DIVISION 

Harvey Kailin, Chief 

Louis Greenberg, Assistant Chief for Census Programs from 

Mar. 1968 
Max Shor, Assistant Chief for Staff and Special Projects 
Henry Wulff, Assistant Chief for Census Programs to Mar. 1968 
Robert Viehman, Staff Assistant for Liaison and Coordination 

of Census Programs 
Paul Shapiro, Assistant Chief for Current Business Programs 
Ralph S. Woodruff, Assistant Chief for Research and 
Methodology 



KEY PERSONNEL 



89 



BUSINESS DIVISION-Continued 
Retail Census Branch 

Michael Farrell, Chief from Mar. 1969 
Gerald Post, Chief to Dec. 1967 
Sol Helfand, Statistician to Mar. 1968 
Bobby Russell, Statistician 
Mabel Foster, Statistician 



ECONOMIC ANALYSIS DIVISION' 



Edward A. Robinson, 



FIELD DIVISION 



Chief from June 1970; 

Assistant Division Chief for Economic 

Analysis, Industry Division to June 1970 



Wholesale Census Branch 

Caesar Hill, Chief from Aug. 1970 
John Albright, Chief to Mar. 1969 
Earl Wiley, Statistician 
Philip Thomas, Statistician 

Service Census Branch 

John Wikoff, Chief from Mar. 1969 
Sol Helfand, Chief to Mar. 1969 
John Dodds, Statistician 
Anna Miller, Statistician to Mar. 1968 

Miscellaneous Surveys Branch 

Robert Schiedel, Chief 

Angel Landron, Statistician (Territories) to Apr. 1969 

Philip Chenoweth, Statistician 



CONSTRUCTION STATISTICS DIVISION 

Samuel J. Dennis, Chief 

Benjamin D. Kaplan, Assistant Chief for Programs to Aug. 1 970 

Jack S. Silver, Assistant Chief for Statistical Research and 

Methods 
Donald E. Young, Assistant Chief for Industry Surveys from 

Aug. 1969; 

Chief, Construction Census Branch to Aug. 

1969 

General Contractor-Builder Branch 

Alan I. Blum, Acting Chief from Jan. 1969 

Kenneth R. Brimmer, Chief from June 1968 to Jan. 1969 

Charles A. Nicholls, Chief to June 1968 

William W. Langham, Statistician 

Margaret A. Tannahill, Statistical Assistant 

Jacqueline W. Knight, Statistical Assistant from Feb. 1970 

Special Trades Contractor Branch 

Alan I. Blum, Chief 

A. William Visnansky, Statistician 

Elaine M. White, Statistician 

Doris B. Barnes, Statistical Assistant 



Statistical Research and Methods Staff 

Edward K. Ricketts, Mathematical Statistician 

Judith A. Reuter, Mathematical Statistician from July 1968 to 

Aug. 1969 
Frances T. Payet, Mathematical Statistician from June 1970 



Paul R. Squires, Chief from Aug. 1970; 

Assistant Chief for Administration to Aug. 1970 
Jefferson D. McPike, Chief to Aug. 1970 
Richard C. Burt, Assistant Chief for Programs from Oct. 1 969 
Richard J. Mullikin, Assistant Chief for Programs to Aug. 1969 

Construction and Related Surveys Branch 

Philip B. Chovan, Chief 

Demographic Current Surveys Branch 

Lincoln H. Steigerwalt, Chief from Aug. 1970 
Curtis T. Hill, Chief to Aug. 1970 
Rex L. Pullin, Chief to Apr. 1969 

GENERAL ECONOMIC STATISTICS DIVISION 

Shirley Kallek, Chief from June 1970 

Robert P. Parker, Enterprise Statistics Coordinator from Oct. 

1969 

Economic Statistician to Oct. 1969 
Murray D. Dessel, Enterprise Statistics Coordinator to Oct. 1969 
Lawrence H. Lyons, Economic Statistician 
David E. Henderson, Economic Statistician 
Lawrence E. Britt, Economic Statistician 
Sallie P. Cook, Statistical Assistant 

GENERAL REPORTS DIVISION 

Edwin D. Goldfield, Chief to May 1970 
William Lerner, Chief from May 1970; 

Assistant Chief to May 1970 
Edward P. Swan, Assistant Chief from May 1968 

History and Research Reports Branch 

Phyllis G. Carter, Chief 

Charles G. Langham, Economic Censuses Historian from Feb. 

1970 
Florence R. Haimes, Economic Censuses Historian to Feb. 

1970 

Statistical Abstract Branch 

Helen Tier, Chief 

GEOGRAPHY DIVISION 

William T. Fay, Chief 

Gerald J. Post, Assistant Chief for Planning 

Robert C. Klove, Assistant Chief for Research and Development 



2 This division was organized in May 1970 to expand the Bureau's 
economic analysis and research activities and prepare special reports on 
current economic problems. 



90 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



GEOGRAPHY DIVISION-Continued 
Operations Planning Branch 

Robert E. Durland, Chief 

Program Analysis Branch 

Jacob Silver, Chief 

Cartographic Methods Branch 

Ross E. Vaughn, Chief 

Census Tract Branch 

Toshi Toki, Chief 

Statistical Areas Branch 

Margery H. Eliot, Chief 

INDUSTRY AND COMMODITY CLASSIFICATION STAFF 

Harold T. Goldstein, Chief 

Walter E. Neece, Industry Classification 

Shirley S. Dungee, Foreign Trade and Commodity Classification 

INDUSTRY DIVISION 

Owen C. Gretton, Chief 

Milton Eisen, Assistant Chief for Program Development to May 

1970 
Elmer S. Biles, Assistant Chief for Program Implementation 
Jack L. Ogus, Assistant Chief for Research and Methodology 
Louis J. Owen, Assistant Chief for Production and Process 

Statistics 
Edward A. Robinson, Assistant Chief for Economic Research to 

May 1970 
Willis K. Jordan, Staff Adviser to the Division Chief 
Vivian E. Spencer, Assistant to the Chief for Mineral Industries 

to Feb. 1969 
Cyril M. Wildes, Assistant to the Chief for Chemicals and Wood 
Products 

Food, Textiles, Apparel, and Leather Branch 

Robert J. Nealon, Chief 

Bennie A. Daniels, Chief, Apparel and Leather Section 

Evelyn 0. Denny, Chief, Textiles Section 
Charles H. W. Sedgewick, Chief, Foods Section 

Wood, Nonmetallic Materials, and Chemical Products Branch 

Lonnie M. Conner, Chief, Paper, Printing and Publishing, and 

Nonmetallic Minerals Section 
Kenneth E. McBeth, Chief, Lumber and Wood Products Section 
Reese R. Morgan, Chief, Chemicals Section 

Metals and Metal Products Branch 

Paul F. Berard, Chief 

Malcolm E. Bernhardt, Chief, Metals Section 
John P. McNamee, Chief, Machinery Section 
Dale W. Gordon, Chief, Electrical Machinery and Transportation 
Equipment Section 



INDUSTRY DIVISION-Continued 
Mineral Industries Branch 

John S. Berube, Chief 

Patricia Horning, Chief, Coal and Nonmetallic Minerals Section 

Frank W. Roy, Chief, Metal Mining and Oil and Gas Section 

Commodity and Materials Data Branch 

William R. Gray, Chief from Feb. 1969 
Edward D. Gruen, Chief to Feb. 1969 

Industry and Commodity Classification Branch 

William Cooper, Chief 

Statistical Research and Methodology Branch 

Donald F. Clark, Chief 

Company Statistics Branch 

Joanne M. Katz, Chief 

Annual Survey of Manufactures Branch 

Robert E. Crowther, Chief 

Division Management Branch 

William D. McCarthy, Chief 
Angela R. Daly, Publications Officer 

Catherine R. Stone, Chief, Information and Correspondence 
Section 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS DIVISION 

Joseph F. Arbena, Chief from July 1967 

Robert D. Krook, Chief to Apr. 1967 

Reese P. Helmer, Assistant Chief for Processing from July 1969 

James S. Werking, Assistant Chief for Processing to Mar. 1969 

A. Reid Steele, Assistant Chief for Administrative Services 



Economic Census Operations Branch 

Margaret Rommel, Chief 
Charles L. Adams, Assistant Chief 



Statistical Methods Branch 

Kathern M. Clay, Chief 

Data Processing Systems Branch 

Jordon E. Home, Chief 

Production Control and Scheduling Branch 

C. W. Kemp, Chief 

Charles F. Blasdel, Assistant Chief 

Personnel Branch 

George M. Bowden, Chief 



KEY PERSONNEL 



91 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS 
DIVISION-Continued 

Management and Finance Branch 

Hubert A. Smith, Chief, Finance Section 
David Primack, Chief, Management Section 

Office Services Branch 

Leonard Wilhelmus, Chief 

Reproduction and Materials Distribution Branch 

William L. Pangburn, Chief 

MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION DIVISION 

Samuel 0. Maslak, Chief 
Charles M. Huff, Staff Assistant 
George E. Pierce, Staff Assistant 

Economic Program Analysis Branch 

Don W. LeCrone, Chief from Nov. 1967 

Joseph C. Aubele, Acting Chief to Oct. 1967 

Theresa A. Brelsford, Management Analyst from Apr. 1967 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

James P. Taff, Chief 

Classification Branch 

Gregory T. Diaz, Chief from Apr. 1970 

Paul A. Katz, Chief from July 1967 to Mar. 1970 

Walter J. Beller, Chief to June 1967 

Employee Development 

Paul A. Katz, Chief from Apr. 1970 to Aug. 1970 
James E. Vawter, Chief to Mar. 1970 

Employment Branch 

Walter J. Beller, Chief from July 1967 
Donald L. Fay, Chief to June 1967 

Personnel Services Branch 

William N. Turanin, Chief from July 1970 

Russell L. Valentine, Chief from May 1969 to June 1970 

Gregory T. Diaz, Chief to Apr. 1969 

PROCESSING DIVISION 

M. Douglas Fahey, Chief 

Rudolph M. Micoly, Assistant Chief (Administration) 

James W. Shores, Assistant Chief (EDP Operations) 

William M. Gaines, Assistant Chief (Engineering) 

E. Richard Bourdon, Assistant Chief (Clerical Processing) 



PROCESSING DIVISION-Continued 
Clerical Processing Branch 

Reese P. Helmer, Chief 

Computer Operations Branch 

Joseph F. Pewterbaugh, Chief 

Control and Coordination Branch 

Denver C. Pitts, Chief 



Directory Branch 

Martin G. Snellings, Chief from July 1968 
Jerry S. Cooper, Chief to July 1968 



Engineering Development Laboratory 

Anthony A. Berlinsky, Chief 

Martin J. Brennan, Electronic Design Engineer 

Ben E. Kappes, Electronic Design Engineer 



Engineering Research Branch 

McRae Anderson, Chief 

Engineering Maintenance Branch 

Joseph V. Marean, Chief 

Input Preparation Branch 

Joseph M. Wiesinger, Chief from Mar. 1969 
Dorothy L. Brown, Chief to Mar. 1969 

Management Control Branch 

Walter H. Phillips, Chief 

Production Branch 

Willie E. Clark, Chief from Aug. 1968 
William R. Buettner, Chief to Aug. 1968 

Special Services Branch 
Elizabeth T. North, Chief 

Tape Management Branch 

Francis A. Oleksak, Chief 

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 

A. Whitney Shoemaker, Chief from Nov. 1969 to Oct. 1970 

John C. Baker, Chief to Oct. 1969 

Arthur E. Mielke, Public Information Specialist 



92 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



STATISTICAL RESEARCH DIVISION 

Thomas B. Jabine, Chief from Jan. 1969 

William N. Hurwitz, Chief to Jan. 1969 

James P. Corbett, Mathematical Statistician (Disclosure 

Analysis) 
Robert W. Reynolds, Programer (Disclosure Analysis), detailed 

from Systems Division 
George Minton, Mathematical Statistician (Geographic Coding, 

SIC Coding by Computer) 
Thomas R. O'Reagan, Mathematical Statistician (Geographic 
Coding, SIC Coding by Computer) 

SYSTEMS DIVISION 

Sol Dolleck, Chief 

Jack Margolis, Special Assistant 

Francis Boucher, Assistant Chief for Administration 

Eugene L. Wendt, Assistant Chief for Periodic Censuses 

Glenn H. Goetz, Fiscal Officer, Economic Censuses from Dec. 

1967 
Walter H. Phillips, Fiscal Officers of Economic Censuses to 
June 1967 

Processing Coordination Branch 

James R. Pepal, Chief 

Caromel Wooton, Assistant Chief 

William R. Buettner, Supervisory Computer Production 

Coordinator from Jan. 1970 
Jesse Verdeja, Supervisory Computer Production Coordinator 

to Dec. 1969 
Gerald Churgin, Computer Production Coordinator 
Irene Burgess, Processing Operations Coordinator 
Edna Pavol, Processing Operations Coordinator to Aug. 1969 
Eugene P. Pencofski, Computer Production Coordinator 
Naomi J. McKethan, Computer Production Coordinator 
Percy Moore, Computer Production Coordinator 
Roderick C. Quainton, Computer Production Coordinator 



Transportation and Construction Programing Branch 

Desmond Carron, Chief 

Edna J. Foust, Computer Programer (Transportation Census) 
Alfred Hawkins, Computer Programer (Construction Census) 
Joseph Finn, Computer Programer (Construction Census) 



Methods, Procedures, and Quality Control Branch 

Samuel Schweid, Chief from July 1968; Special Assistant to 

July 1968 
Morris Gorinson, Chief to July 1968 
Maxwell Jeane, Chief, Quality Control 
Alvin H. Barten, Business Census Procedures Specialist 
Carl W. Mueller, Geographic Area Coding Procedures Specialist 
Evelyn V. Williams, Industry Census Procedures Specialist 
Leonard M. Tauber, Data Processing Procedures Specialist 
Alfred R. Brand , Jr., Multiunit Procedures Specialist 
Thomas W. Lowenstein, Directory Procedures Specialist 
Geraldine G. Manuel, Check-in and Collection Procedures 

Specialist 
Carmen D. Taylor, Annual Survey of Manufactures Procedures 

Specialist 
John F. Powell, Quality Control Specialist 
Carl D. Jablin, Quality Control Specialist 



SYSTEMS DIVISION-Continued 

Current Industry and Business Programing Branch 

Heyward D. Glisson, Chief 

Paul E. Poissant, Miscellaneous Edits Specialist 

Industry Census and ASM Program Branch 

Mary H. Johnson, Chief 

James W. Moyers, Computer Programer (Manufactures and 

Minerals) 
Stephan H. Potemkin, Computer Programer (Annual Survey 

of Manufactures) 
Robert S. Taylor, Computer Programer (General Statistics 

Edit) 
Gene Haggy, Computer Programer (Manufactures) 

Business Census Programing Branch 

William J. Lorenz, Chief from Dec. 1968; 

Computer Programer (Retail and Service) to 
Dec. 1968 
John S. Lannan, Chief to Dec. 1968 

Jordan L. Harding, Computer Systems Analyst to Mar. 1969 
Robert T. Janshego, Computer Programer (Retail) from July 

1969 
Barbara M. Barton, Computer Programer (Retail) from July 

1969 to June 1970 
Katherine A. Fresher, Computer Programer (Wholesale) from 

July 1970 
Martha I. Sullivan, Computer Programer (Wholesale) to June 

1970 
Mary Lynn Parsons, Computer Programer (Service) from Sept. 

1970 
Robert G. Willner, Computer Programer (Service) from Sept. 

1969 to Nov. 1970 
C. Vaughn Paddock, Computer Programer (Construction) 
Herberts. Isham, Jr., Computer Programer (Enterprise 
Statistics) 

Cross Area Projects Branch 

Andrew Grieco, Chief from Nov. 1968; Assistant Chief to Nov. 

1968 
Zigmund Decker, Chief to Nov. 1968 
Terence D. McDowell, Geographic Area Coding Specialist 
Wilbur L. Shipp, Multiunit Specialist 
Charles A. Venters, Mailing and Collection Specialist 

TRANSPORTATION DIVISION 

Donald E. Church, Chief 
Walter F. Buhl, Assistant Chief 

Max VanHorn, Coordinator of Data Processing to Feb. 1970 
Kathleen E. Sier, Supervisor of Tabulation Review to May 1970 
Evelyn S. Davis, Publication Program Specialist 
Donald Wright, Sampling and Statistical Specialist from Feb. 
1970 

Survey Programs Branch 

Jerry Litzky, Chief 

Operations and Management Branch 

Kathryn C. Farmer, Chief to Apr. 1970 



Appendix B 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON THE CENSUS INQUIRIES 

1967 Census of Business: Consultation and Meetings 
on the Census Inquiries 



This part of appendix B presents a list of the trade associations consulted about the content of the 1967 Census of Business 
questionnaires. At some meetings, several associations were represented. The association meetings were frequently quite informal 
affairs at which only one Census Bureau representative and one or two members of the association were present. In some cases, 
however, associations were represented by a number of members. 



Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Wholesalers Association 
Allied States Association of Motion Picture Exhibitors 
American Association of Advertising Agencies 
American Association of Aluminum Importers & Warehouse 

Distributors 
American Association of Credit Counselors 
American Association of Film Producers 
American Automotive Leasing Association 
American Booksellers Association 
American Bottled Water Association 
American Certified Morticians Association 
American Collectors Association, Inc. 
American Cotton Linter Association 
American Cotton Waste Exchange 
American Council of Independent Laboratories 
American Dental Trade Association 
American Fur Merchants Association 
American Greyhound Track Operators Association 
American Hotel & Motel Association 
American Institute of Food Distribution, Inc. 
American Institute of Interior Designers 
American Institute of Laundering 
American Institute of Supply Associations, Inc. 
American Machine Tool Distributors Association 
American Motel Association 
American National Theatre & Academy 
American Petroleum Institute 
American Rental Association 
American Research Merchandising Institute 
American Retail Coal Association 
American Science Film Association 
American Seafood Distributors Association 
American Society for Testing & Materials 
American Spice Trade Association 
American Surgical Trade Association 
Appliance Parts Distributors Association 
Associated Credit Bureaus of America 
Associated Equipment Distributors 
Associated Master Barbers & Beauticians of America 
Associated Retail Bakers of America 
Associated Retail Confectioners of North America 
Associated Telephone Answering Exchanges 



Association of Cinema Laboratories, Inc. 

Association of Data Processing Service Organizations 

Association of Equipment Lessors 

Association of Executive Recruiting Consultants 

Association of Food Distributors 

Association of Institutional Distributors 

Association of Management Consultants, Inc. 

Association of Motion Picture & Television Producers 

Association of Private Camps 

Association of Publishers' Representatives 

Association of Steel Distributors 

Automotive Service Industry Association 

Automotive Warehouse Distributors Association 

Beauty & Barber Supply Institute 

Billiard & Bowling Institute of America 

Biscuit & Cracker Distributors Association 

Bowling Proprietors Association of America, Inc. 

Burley Leaf Tobacco Dealers Association 

Car & Truck Renting & Leasing Association 

Central Supply Association 

Certified Livestock Markets Association 

Commercial Laundry Council 

Cooperative Food Distributors of America 

Cooperative League of the U.S.A. 

Copper Brass Warehouse Association 

Council for Periodical Distributors Association 

Dairy & Food Industries Supply Association, Inc. 

Diaper Service Industry Association 

Direct Mail Advertising Association 

Dude Ranchers Association 

Electrical Apparatus Service Association, Inc. 

Farm Equipment Wholesalers Association 

Federal Wholesale Druggists Association of the U.S.A. & 

Canada, Inc. 
Flat Glass Marketing Association 
Food Service Equipment Industry 
Guild of American Funeral Directors 
Hosiery Wholesalers National Association 
Horticultural Dealers Association, Inc. 
Independent Film Importers & Distributors of America, Inc. 
Independent Garage Owners of America, Inc. 
Independent Livestock Marketing Association 



93 



94 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Independent Motion Picture Producers Association 

Independent Shoemen, Inc. 

Industrial Designers Society of America, Inc. 

Industrial Photographers Association of America 

Institute of Distribution 

Institute of Industrial Launderers 

Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel 

Institutional & Service Textile Distributors Association 

International Advertising Association, Inc. 

International Association of Amusement Parks 

International Association of Blue Print & Allied Industries, Inc. 

International Association of Fairs & Expositions 

International Association of Independent Producers 

International Consumer Credit Association 

International Sanitary Supply Association 

Laundry & Cleaners Allied Trades Association 

Linen Supply Association of America 

Machinery Dealers National Association 

Mail Advertising Service Association International 

Mail Order Association of America 

Mailing List Brokers Professional Association 

Manufacturers Agents National Association 

Marketing Research Trade Association 

Master Furriers Guild of America 

Master Photo Dealers' & Finishers' Association 

Menswear Retailers of America 

Mobile Housing Association of America 

Motel Association of America 

Motion Picture Association of America 

Music Operators of America 

Mutual Protective Association, Inc. 



Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Inc. 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 
Nationa 



Alliance of Television & Electronic Service Associations 
American Wholesale Grocers Association 
-American Wholesale Lumber Association 
Appliance & Radio TV Dealers Association 
Appliance Service Association 
Armored Car Association 
Association of Building Service Contractors 
Association of Chain Drug Stores 
Association of Coin Laundry Equipment Operators, 

Association of Certified Dentai Laboratories 
Association of Cosmetology Schools, Inc. 
Association of Credit Management 
Association of Discount Merchants 
Association of Electrical Distributors 
Association of Engine and Boat Manufacturers, Inc. 
Association of Flour Distributors 
Association of Food Chains 
Association of Greeting Card Publishers 
Association of Independent Food Retailers 
Association of Mass Merchandisers 
Association of Meat Purveyors 
Association of Music Merchants, Inc. 
Association of Musical Merchandist Wholesalers 
Association of Purchasing Management 
Association of Record Merchandisers 
Association of Retail Druggists 
Association of Retail Grocers of the United States 
Association of Secondary Material Industries 
Association of Sporting Goods Wholesalers 
Association of Textile & Apparel Wholesalers 
Association of Theatre Owners, Inc. 



National Association of Tobacco Distributors 

National Association of Wholesalers 

National Association of Wiping Cloth Manufacturers 

National Auto Auction Association 

National Automatic Laundry & Cleaning Council 

National Automobile Dealers Association 

National Automotive Radiator Service Association 

National Barrel & Drum Association 

National Beer Wholesalers' Association of America, Inc. 

National Building Material Distributors Association 

National Candy Wholesalers Association 

National Coal Association 

National Coffee Association of the U.S.A. 

National Coin Machine Distributors Association 

National Congress of Petroleum Retailers 

National Electronic Distributors Association 

National Employment Association 

National Farm & Power Equipment Dealers Association 

National Federation of Independent Scrap Yard Dealers 

National Food Brokers Association 

National Food Distributors Association 

National Frozen Food Association 

National Funeral Directors & Morticians Association 

National Funeral Directors Association 

National Glass Dealers Association 

National Grain Trade Council 

National Hairdressers & Cosmetologists Association 

National Hardwood Lumber Association 

National Home Service Association 

National Independent Automobile Dealers Association 

National Institute of Diaper Services 

National Institute of Drycleaning 

National Institute of Rug Cleaning, Inc. 

National Licensed Beverage Association 

National Liquor Stores Association, Inc. 

National Luggage Dealers Association 

National Lumber & Building Material Dealers Association 

National Microfilm Association 

National Office Machine Dealers Association 

National Office Products Association 

National Paint, Varnish & Lacquer Association 

National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 

National Parking Association 

National Pest Control Association 

National Plywood Distributors Association 

National Poultry, Butter & Egg Association 

National Restaurant Association 

National Retail Furniture Association 

National Retail Hardware Association 

National Retail Merchants Association 

National Sash & Door Jobbers Association 

National School Supply & Equipment Association 

National Selected Morticians 

National Shoe Retailers Association 

National Society of Interior Designers, Inc. 

National Sporting Goods Association 

National Sugar Brokers Association 

National Tire Dealers & Retreaders Association, Inc. 

National Trailer Rental Association 

National Welding Supply Association 

National Wheel & Rim Association 

National Wholesale Druggists Association 

National Wholesale Furniture Association 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



95 



National Wholesale Hardware Association 

National Wholesale Lumber Distributing Yard Association, Inc. 

National Wholesaler Jewelers Association 

National Wool Growers Association 

Nationwide Hotel Association 

National American Heating & Air Conditioning Wholesalers 

Association 
Optical Wholesalers Association 
Outdoor Advertising Association of America, Inc. 
Paint and Wallpaper Association of America, Inc. 
Petroleum Equipment Institute 
Petroleum Equipment Suppliers Association 
Photographic Society of America 
Power Transmission Distributors Association 
Premium Advertising Association of America, Inc. 
Professional Photographers of America, Inc. 
Public Relations Society of America 
Radio Advertising Bureau 
Rental Service Association 
Retail Jewelers of America, Inc. 
Retail Tobacco Dealers of America 
Roller Skating Rink Operators Association of America 
Shoe Service Institute of America 



Society of American Florists 

Steel Service Center Institute 

Supermarket Institute, Inc. 

Television Bureau of Advertising 

Textile Distributors Association, Inc. 

Textile Fibers & By-Products Association 

Thoroughbred Racing Associations of the United States 

Tobacco Merchants Association of the U.S. 

Toiletry Merchandisers Association, Inc. 

Trading Stamp Institute of America, Inc. 

Truck Equipment & Body Distributors Association, Inc. 

United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association 

United Rink Operators 

U.S. Wholesale Grocers' Association, Inc. 

Variety Stores Association 

Volume Footwear Retailers Association, Inc. 

Wallcovering Wholesalers Association 

Watch Material Distributors Association of America, Inc. 

Wholesale Florists & Florist Suppliers of America 

Wholesale School, Art & Stationery Suppliers of America 

Wholesale Stationers' Association, Inc. 

Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America, Inc. 

Women's Apparel Chains Association 



1967 Census of Construction Industries: Consultation 
and Meetings on the Census Inquiries 



Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute 

American Boiler Manufacturers Association 

American Ceramic Society, Inc. 

American Concrete Institute 

American Concrete Pipe Association 

American Gas Association, Inc. 

American Hardware Manufacturers Association 

American Institute of Architects 

American Institute of Consulting Engineers 

American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 

American Iron & Steel Institute 

American Pipe Fittings Association 

American Road Builders Association 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

American Society of Concrete Constructors 

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air Conditioning 

Engineers, Inc. 
American Society of Landscape Architects 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
American Water Works Association, Inc. 
Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association 

Asbestos-Cement Products Association 

Asphalt and Vinyl Asbestos Tile Institute 

Asphalt Roofing Industry Bureau 

Associated General Contractors of America 

Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association 

Building Owners & Managers Association International 

Building Research Institute 

Building Stone Institute 

Building Waterproofers Association 

Cast Iron Soil Pipe Institute 

Chamber of Commerce of the U.S. 



Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute 

Construction Industry Manufacturers Association 

Consulting Engineers Council of the U.S.A. 

Contracting Plasterers and Lathers International Association 

Contractors Pump Bureau 

Conveyor Equipment Manufacturers Association 

Council of Mechanical Specialty Contracting Industries, Inc. 

Expanded Shale, Clay and Slate Institute 

Facing Tile Institute 

Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

General Building Contractors Association, Inc. 

Gypsum Association 

Hollow Metal Door and Buck Association 

Home Improvement Dealers Association of America 

Home Manufacturers Association 

Incinerator Institute of America 

Institute of Boiler and Radiator Manufacturers 

Institute of Life Insurance 

Insulation Board Institute 

Marble Institute of America 

Mason Contractors Association of America 

Mechanical Contractors Association of America, Inc. 

Metal Lath Association 

Mortgage Bankers Association of America 

National Acoustical Contractors Association 

National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers 

National Association of Home Builders of the U.S. 

National Association of Manufacturers 

National Association of Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors 

National Association of Real Estate Boards 

National Association of River and Harbor Contractors 

National Automatic Sprinkler and Fire Control Association 



96 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



National Builders Hardware Association 
National Building Products Association 
National Cinder Concrete Products Association 
National Clay Pipe Institute 
National Concrete Masonry Association 
National Constructors Association 
National Electrical Contractors Association, Inc. 
National Elevator Manufacturing Industry, Inc. 
National Established Repair Service and Improvement 
Contractors Association, Inc. 



Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 
Nat 



onal Forest Products Association 

onal Home Improvement Council, Inc. 

onal Kitchen Cabinet Association 

onal Paint, Varnish and Lacquer Association 

onal Ready-Mixed Concrete Association 

onal Roofing Contractors Association 

onal Society of Professional Engineers 

onal Terrazzo and Mosaic Association, Inc. 

onal Warm Air Heating and Air Conditioning Association 

onal Water Well Association, Inc. 



Painting and Decorating Contractors of America 

Pipe Line Contractors Association 

Plumbing Brass Institute 

Plumbing Fixture Manufacturers Association 

Portland Cement Association 

Prestressed Concrete Institute 

Producers Council, Inc., The 

Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National 
Association, Inc. 

Steel Door Institute 
Steel Plate Fabricators Association 
Steel Window Institute 
Structural Clay Products Institute 

Tile Contractors Association of America, Inc. 

Tile Council of America, Inc. 

Truck Mixer Manufacturers Bureau 

U.S. Savings and Loan League 

Wallpaper Council, Inc. 

Wallpaper Institute 



1967 Census of Manufactures: Federal Agencies and Trade Associations 
Consulted for Clearance of Product, Material, and Special Inquiries 



This part of appendix B comprises a list of trade associations consulted by mail for the purpose of clearing pertinent inquiries on the 
census questionnaires. In addition, a number of government agencies were consulted. 



All questionnaires were cleared by the following agencies: 

Resource Program Staff, Office of the Secretary, U.S. 

Department of the Interior 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor 
Tariff Commission 

Office of Business Economics, U.S. Department of Commerce 

Business and Defense Services Administration, U.S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce 

Office of Statistical Standards, U.S. Bureau of the Buoget 

Directorate for Statistical Services, Office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), U.S. Department of 
Defense 

National Resource Evaluation Center, Office of Emergency 
Planning 

Office of Assistant to the Secretary for Program Analysis, 
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 

Board of Governors, Federal Reserve System 

Many of the questionnaires were also cleared by these agencies: 

Statistical Reporting Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior 
Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of the Interior 
Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Treasury Department 
Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare 

Particular questionnaires or groups of questionnaires for 
manufacturing activities in specific Standard Industrial 
Classification (SIC) categories were reviewed by appropriate 
trade associations as follows: 



MAJOR GROUP 19 (Ordnance and Accessories) 

(Industries 1911, 1929, 1931, 1951, 1961, and 1999) 

Air Filter Institute, Inc. 
Aluminum Association, The 
American Ordnance Association 

MAJOR GROUP 20 (Food and Kindred Products) 
(Industries 2011, 2013, and 2015) 

American Meat Institute 
Institute of American Poultry Industries 
National Independent Meat Packers Association 
National Poultry, Butter and Egg Association 

(Industries 2021 to 2024, and 2026) 

American Butter Institute 

American Dry Milk Institute 

Evaporated Milk Association 

International Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers 

National Cheese Institute 

(Industries 2032, 2033, 2035, and 2037) 

American Institute of Food Distribution, Inc. 

Mayonnaise & Salad Dressing Institute 

National Association of Frozen Food Packers 

National Canners Association 

National Prepared Frozen Food Processors Association 

National Preservers Association 

Pickle Packers International 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRES 



97 



MAJOR GROUP 20 (Food and Kindred Products)-Con. 



MAJOR GROUP 20 (Food and Kindred Products)-Con. 



(Industries 2034, 2095, and 2099) 

American Institute of Food Distribution, Inc. 
Mayonnaise & Salad Dressing Institute 
National Preservers Association 

(Industries 2041, 2044, and 2045) 

American Corn Millers Federation 
Millers National Federation 
Rice Millers Association 



(Industry 2045) 

National Renderers Association, Inc. 

(Industries 2042, 2043, and 2045) 

American Feed Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Association of Operative Millers 

Cereal Institute 

Grain and Feed Dealers National Association 

(Industry 2051) 

American Bakers Association 
Associated Retail Bakers of America 

(Industry 2052) 

American Bakers Association 

Associated Retail Bakers of America 

Biscuit and Crackers Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 2061 to 2063) 

U.S. Beet Sugar Association 

U.S. Cane Sugar Refiners Association 

(Industry 2073) 

National Confectioners Association of the U.S.,, Inc. 

(Industries 2082 and 2083) 

Barley and Malt Institute 
Distilled Spirits Institute, Inc. 
National Soft Drink Association 
U.S. Brewers Association, Inc. 
Wine Institute 



(Industries 2091 to 2093, and 2096) 

American Meat Institute 

Institute of Shortening and Edible Oils, Inc. 

National Association of Margarine Manufacturers 

National Cottonseed Products Association 

National Flaxseed Processors 

National Institute of Oilseed Products 

National Renderers Association, Inc. 

Soap and Detergent Association 

Soybean Processors Association 



(Industry 2097) 

National Coffee Association of the U.S.A. 
National Macaroni Manufacturers Association 
National Renderers Association, Inc. 
Peanut Butter Manufacturers Association 
Soap and Detergent Association 



MAJOR GROUP 22 (Textile Mill Products) 

(Industries 2211, 2221, 2231, 2241, 2261, 2262, 2271, 
2272, 2279, 2281, 2283, and 2296) 

American Carpet Institute, Inc. 

American Silk Council, Inc. 

Man-Made Fiber Producers Association, Inc. 

Narrow Fabrics Institute 

Silk & Rayon Printers & Dyers Association of America 

(Industries 2251 and 2252) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
National Association of Hosiery Manufacturers 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
National Knitted Outerwear Association 
Northern Textile Association 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2256 and 2259) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
Association of Knitted Fabrics Manufacturers 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
National Knitted Outerwear Association 
Northern Textile Association 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2269) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

American Silk Council, Inc. 

Man-Made Fiber Producers Association, Inc. 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Papermakers Woven Felt Association 

Silk & Rayon Printers & Dyers Association of America 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 



(Industries 2281 and 2283) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

American Yarn Spinners Association 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Wool Associates of the New York Cotton Exchange, Inc. 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 



98 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



MAJOR GROUP 22 (Textile Mill Products) -Con. 

(Industries 2282 and 2284) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
American Yarn Spinners Association 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
Northern Textile Association 
Thread Institute, Inc. 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2291 and 2299) 

American Carpet Institute, Inc. 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2292) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Leavers Lace Manufacturers of America, Inc. 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Schiffli Lace & Embroidery Manufacturers Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2293 and 2294) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
Northern Textile Association 
Textile Fibres & By-Products Association 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2295) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
Northern Textile Association 
Vinyl Fabrics Institute 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2297) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
Northern Textile Association 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2298) 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Cordage Institute 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Thread Institute, Inc. 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 



MAJOR GROUP 23 (Apparel and Other Finished Products 
Made From Fabrics and Similar Materials) 

(Industries 2323, 2384, 2386, and 2387) 

American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Belt Association, Inc. 

Boys' & Young Men's Apparel Manufacturers Association 

Clothing Manufacturers Association of the U.S.A. 

Manufacturers Association of Robes, Leisurewear, Shirts and 
Rainwear 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

National Neckwear Association 

Northern Textile Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2351 and 2352) 

Allied Hat Manufacturers Association 

American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Hat Institute 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cap and Cloth Hat Institute 

National Cotton Council of America 

National Millinery Planning Board 

Northern Textile Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2371, 2389, 2391, and 2393) 

American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Burlap and Jute Association 

Corset and Brassiere Association of America 

Handkerchief Industry Association 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industry 2392) 

American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

American Textile Manufacturers 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 

National Cotton Council of America 

Northern Textile Association 

Textile Bag Manufacturers Association 

Wool Bureau, Inc. 

(Industries 2394 to 2397, and 2399) 

American Apparel Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
American Textile Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 
Automobile Seat Cover Association of America 
Canvas Products Association International 
National Association of Wool Manufacturers 
National Cotton Council of America 
Northern Textile Association 

Schiffli Lace & Embroidery Manufacturers Association 
Wool Bureau, Inc. 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



99 



MAJOR GROUP 24 (Lumber and Wood Products, Except 
Furniture) 



MAJOR GROUP 24 (Lumber and Wood Products, 
Except Furniture)— Con. 



(Industries 2411, 2421, and 2426) 

American Forest Institute 

American Pulpwood Association 

American Walnut Manufacturers Association 

California Redwood Association 

Hardwood Dimension Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Hickory Handle Association 

Mahogany Association, Inc. 

Maple Flooring Manufacturers Association 

National Forest Products Association 

National Hardwood Lumber Association 

National Oak Flooring Manufacturers Association 

National Particleboard Association 

Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Northern Hardwood and Pine Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Northwestern Lumbermen's Association 

Pacific Logging Congress 

Railway Tie Association 

Southern Cypress Manufacturers Association 

Southern Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association 

Southern Pine Association 

Western Forest Industries Association 

Western Lumber Manufacturers, Inc. 

Western Red Cedar Lumber Association 

Western Wood Products Association 

(Industries 2429, 2431, and 2432) 

American Plywood Association 

Architectural Woodwork Institute 

Fine Hardwoods Association 

Flat Veneer Products Association 

Hardwood Plywood Manufacturers Association 

Mobile Homes Manufacturers Association 

National Hardwood Lumber Association 

National Kitchen Cabinet Association 

National Particleboard Association 

National Sash and Door Jobbers Association 

National Woodwork Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Philippine Mahogany Association 

Ponderosa Pine Woodwork Association 

Red Cedar Shingle and Handsplit Shake Bureau 

Wood Kitchen Cabinet Institute 

Wood Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 2433) 

American Institute of Timber Construction 

American Plywood Association 

Architectural Woodwork Institute 

Home Manufacturers Association 

National Association of Home Builders of the U.S. 

(Industries 2441 to 2443 and 2445) 

American Veneer Package Association 

Associated Cooperage Industries of America, Inc. 

Cigar Box Manufacturers, Inc. 

National Wooden Pallet and Container Association 

Western Wooden Box Association 

Wirebound Box Manufacturers Association 



(Industries 2491 and 2499) 

American Hardboard Association 

American Ladder Institute 

American Wood-Preservers Institute 

Hickory Handle Association 

National Particleboard Association 

National Wood Tank Institute 

National Wooden Pallet and Container Association 

Vacuum Wood Preservers Institute 

Wood-Turners and Shapers Association 

MAJOR GROUP 25 (Furniture and Fixtures) 
(Industries 2511, 2512, 2514, 2515, and 2519) 

Aluminum Association 

Association of Innerspring Manufacturers 

National Association of Furniture Manufacturers 

National Kitchen Cabinet Association 

National Particleboard Association 

Southern Furniture Manufacturers' Association 

Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers' Association 

Wood Kitchen Cabinet Institute 

(Industries 2521, 2522, 2531 , 2541 , 2542, and 2599) 

Business Equipment Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Food Service Equipment Industries 

National Association of Store Fixture Manufacturers 

National Office Products Association 

National Particleboard Association 

Upholstered Furniture Manufacturers Association 

Vinyl Fabrics Institute 

(Industry 2591) 

National Particleboard Association 



MAJOR GROUP 26 (Paper and Allied Products) 

(Industries 2611, 2621, 2631, and 2661) 

Acoustical Materials & Insulation Board Manufacturers 

Association 
American Pulpwood Association 
Bleached Converting & Packaging Paper Manufacturers 

Association 
Fibre Box Association 

Glassine and Greaseproof Manufacturers Association 
Kraft Paper Association, Inc. 
National Paperboard Association 
National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 
Printing Paper Manufacturers Association 
Soda Pulp Manufacturers Association 
Specialty Paper & Board Affiliates 
Technical Association of the Pulp & Paper Industry 
Tissue Association 

Vegetable Parchment Manufacturers Association 
Writing Paper Manufacturers Association 



100 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



MAJOR GROUP 26 (Paper and Allied Products)-Con. 

(Industries 2641, 2647, and 2649) 

Drinking Straw Institute 

Envelope Manufacturers Association 

Fibre Box Association 

Food Tray & Board Association, Inc. 

Gummed Industries Association, Inc. 

National Flexible Packaging Association 

National Office Products Association 

National Paper Box Suppliers Association 

National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 

National Paperboard Association 

Packaging Institute, Inc. 

Paper Bag Institute 

Paper Pail Association 

Paper Shipping Sack Manufacturers Association 

Paper Stationery & Tablet Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Pressure Sensitive Tape Council 

Tag & Labei Manufacturers Institute 

Technical Association of the Pulp & Paper Industry 

Tissue Association 



(Industry 2642) 

Envelope Manufacturers Association 

National Flexible Packaging Association 

National Office Products Association 

Packaging Institute, Inc. 

Paper Bag Institute 

Paper Stationery & Tablet Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Specialty Paper & Board Affiliates 

(Industry 2643) 

National Flexible Packaging Association 
Packaging Institute, Inc. 
Paper Bag Institute 

(Industries 2645 and 2646) 

Data Processing Supplies Association 

National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 

Paper Stationery & Tablet Manufacturers Association, Inc. 



(Industries 2651 and 2655) 

Fibre Box Association 

National Association of Sanitary Milk Bottle Closure 

Manufacturers 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
National Fibre Can & Tube Association 
National Paper Box Manufacturers Association 
National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 
Paperboard & Packaging Council 
Specialty Paper & Board Affiliates 
Technical Association of the Pulp & Paper Industry 



(Industry 2664) 

National Paper Trade Association, Inc. 
Wallpaper Institute 



MAJOR GROUP 27 (Printing, Publishing, and Allied Industries) 

(Industry 2711) 

American Association of Newspaper Representatives 

American Newspaper Publishers Association 

Association of Newspaper Classified Advertising Managers 

National Advertising Newspaper Association 

National Newspaper Association 

National Newspaper Publishers Association 

(Industry 2721) 

Agricultural Publishers Association 

Classroom Periodical Publishers Association 

Comics Magazine Association of America 

Magazine Publishers Association, Inc. 

National Newspaper Association 

Periodical Publishers Association of America 

Poultry Publishers Association 

Printing Paper Manufacturers Association 

Vinyl Fabrics Institute 

Writing Paper Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 2731) 

American Book Publishers Council, Inc. 
American Educational Publishers Institute 
Association of North American Directory Publishers 
Book Manufacturers Institute 
Music Publishers Association of the United States 
Printing Industries of America, Inc. 
Religious Publishers Group 
Vinyl Fabrics Institute 

(Industries 2732, 2751 to 2753, and 2761 ) 

Book Manufacturers Institute, Inc. 

Data Processing Supplies Association 

Direct Mail Advertising Association 

Mail Advertising Service Association International 

National Association of Photo-Lithographers 

National Association of Printing Ink Makers 

Printing Industries of America, Inc. 

Printing Paper Manufacturers Association 

Screen Printing Association International 

Tag & Label Manufacturers Institute 

(Industry 2741) 

Music Publishers Association of the United States 
Printing Industries of America, Inc. 
Vinyl Fabrics Institute 

(Industry 2771) 

National Association of Greeting Card Publishers 

(Industries 2782 and 2789) 

Book Manufacturers Institute 

Paper Stationery & Tablet Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 2791, 2793, and 2794) 

Advertising Typographers Association of America 

American Photoplatemakers Association 

International Association of Electrotypers and Stereotypers, Inc. 

International Typographic Composition Association, Inc. 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



101 



MAJOR GROUP 28 (Chemicals and Allied Products) 

(Industry 2816) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

(Industry 2821) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

Rubber Manufacturers Association 

Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association 

Toilet Goods Association 

(Industries 2823 and 2824) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

Rubber Manufacturers Association 

Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 2831 and 2833) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 
National Wholesale Druggist Association 
Parenteral Drug Association 
Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association 
Proprietary Association 

(Industry 2834) 

Compressed Gas Association 
Manufacturing Chemists Association 
Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association 
Proprietary Association 

(Industries 2841 to 2843) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

Soap and Detergent Association 

Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 2844) 

Beauty & Barber Supply Institute 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

National Beauty & Barber Manufacturers Association 

Toilet Goods Association 

(Industry 2851) 

American Bleached Shellac Manufacturers Association 
Manufacturing Chemists Association 
National Paint, Varnish & Lacquer Association 

(Industry 2861) 

American Turpentine Farmers Association Co-op. 
Barbeque Briquet Institute 
Manufacturing Chemists Association 
Water Soluble Gum Association 

(Industries 2871 and 2872) 

Cotton Producers Institute 
Manufacturing Chemists Association 
National Agricultural Chemicals Association 
National Plant Food Institute 
National Renderers Association, Inc. 



MAJOR GROUP 28 (Chemicals and Allied Products)-Con. 

(Industry 2879) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 
National Agricultural Chemicals Association 
Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 2891) 

Adhesive & Sealant Council Inc. 

Adhesives Manufacturers Association of America 

Gelatin Manufacturers Institute of America 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

National Association of Glue Manufacturers, Inc. 

National Renderers Association 

(Industry 2892) 

Institute of Makers of Explosives 
Manufacturing Chemists Association 

(Industry 2893) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 

National Association of Printing Ink Manufacturers 

National Printing Ink Research Institute 

(Industry 2899) 

Chemical Specialties Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Essential Oil Association of the U.S.A. 

National Association of Printing Ink Manufacturers 

Salt Institute 

Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 29 (Petroleum Refining and Related 
Industries) 

(Industries 2911 and 2992) 

American Petroleum Institute 

Asphalt Institute 

Association of Petroleum Re-Refiners 

Independent Oil Compounders Association 

Independent Petroleum Association of America 

Independent Refiners Association of America 

National LP-Gas Association 

National Petroleum Council 

National Petroleum Refiners Association 

Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association 

(Industries 2951, 2952, and 2999) 

American Petroleum Institute 
Asphalt Institute 
Asphalt Roofing Industry Bureau 
Barbeque Briquet Institute 
Independent Oil Compounders Institute 
National Lubricating Grease Institute 
Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Association 

MAJOR GROUP 30 (Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics 
Products) 

(Industries 3011, 3021, 3031, and 3069) 

Adhesive & Sealant Council Inc. 
Rubber Heel and Sole Institute 
Rubber Manufacturers Association 



102 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



MAJOR GROUP 30 (Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics 
Products)— Continued 

(Industry 3079) 

Manufacturing Chemists Association 
National Association of Plastic Fabricators 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
National Insulation Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
Plastic Products Manufacturers Association 
Rubber Manufacturers Association 
Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc. 
Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturers 



MAJOR GROUP 31 (Leather and Leather Products) 

(Industries 3111, 3121, and 3131) 

National Footwear Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
National Industrial Leather Association 
Rubber Heel and Sole Institute 
Shoe Service Institute of America 
Tanners' Council of America 

(Industries 3141 and 3142) 

National Association of Slipper & Playshoe Manufacturers 
National Footwear Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
Tanners' Council of America 

(Industries 3161, 3171, 3172, and 3199) 

Luggage and Leather Goods Manufacturers of 

America, Inc. 
National Handbag Association 
Tanners' Council of America 



MAJOR GROUP 32 (Stone, Clay, Glass, and Concrete Products) 
(Industries 3221 and 3229) 

Glass Container Manufacturers Institute 

(Industry 3231) 

American Glassware Association 

Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association 

Glass Tempering Association 

National Association of Manufacturers of Pressed & Blown 

Glassware 
National Association of Mirror Manufacturers 
Stained and Leaded Glass Association 
Stained Glass Association of America 
Sun Glass Institute of America 



MAJOR GROUP 32 (Stone, Clay, Glass, and 
Concrete Products)— Continued 

(Industries 3251, 3253, and 3259) 

Facing Tile Institute 
National Clay Pipe Institute 
Structural Clay Products Institute 
Tile Council of America, Inc. 
Tile Manufacturers Association 



(Industries 3255 and 3297) 

Refractories Institute 

Special Refractories Association 



(Industry 3261) 

Plumbing Fixture Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3262, 3263, and 3269) 

National Clay Pot Manufacturers Association 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
Plumbing Fixture Manufacturers Association 
Steatite Manufacturers Association 
United States Potters Association 

(Industry 3264) 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
Steatite Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3272) 

American Concrete Institute 
American Concrete Pipe Association 
American Society of Concrete Constructors 
Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute 
National Cinder Concrete Products Association 
National Concrete Burial Vault Association 
National Concrete Masonry Association 
National Ready-Mixed Concrete Association 
National Terrazzo & Mosaic Association, Inc. 
Portland Cement Association 
Prestressed Concrete Institute 
Structural Clay Products Institute 

(Industry 3281) 

American Monument Association 
Barre Granite Association 
Indiana Limestone Institute of America 
Marble Institute of America 
National Slate Association 



(Industries 3241, 3271, and 3273 to 3275) 

American Concrete Institute 

Gypsum Association 

National Lime Association 

National Ready-Mixed Concrete Association 

Portland Cement Association 



(Industry 3291) 

Abrasive Grain Association 
American Society for Abrasive Methods 
Coated Abrasives Manufacturers Institute 
Diamond Wheel Manufacturers Institute 
Grinding Wheel Institute 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



103 



MAJOR GROUP 32 (Stone, Clay, Glass, and Concrete 
Products)— Continued 

(Industry 3292) 

Asbestos- Cement Products Association 

Asbestos Textile Institute 

Asphalt & Vinyl Asbestos Tile Institute 

Friction Materials Standards Institute, Inc. 

National Insulation Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Rubber Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3293) 

National Insulation Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

(Industry 3295) 

National Slag Association 

(Industries 3296 and 3299) 

National Insulation Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
National Mineral Wool Insulation Association 
Vermiculite Institute 



MAJOR GROUP 33 (Primary Metal Industries) 
(Industries 3312, 3313, and 3315) 

American Coke & Coal Chemicals Institute 
American Iron & Steel Institute 
Welded Steel Tube Institute 

(Industries 331 6 and 3317) 

American Iron & Steel Institute 

(Industries 3321 to 3323) 

Alloy Casting Institute 

Aluminum Association, 

Cast Iron Soil Pipe Institute 

Gray & Ductile Iron Founders' Society, Inc. 

Investment Casting Institute 

Malleable Founders Society 

Railway Signal & Communications Suppliers Association 

Steel Founders Society of America 



MAJOR GROUP 33 (Primar Metal lndustries)-Continued 



(Industry 3352) 

Aluminum Association, 
Aluminum Extruders Council 
Aluminum Smelters Research Institute 
National Association of Aluminum Distributors 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 



(Industry 3356) 

Lead Industries Association, Inc. 
Magnesium Association 
Zinc Institute, Inc. 



(Industry 3357) 

Aluminum Association, 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

Welded Steel Tube Institute 



(Industries 3361, 3362, 3369, and 3392) 

Aluminum Association, 

Aluminum Smelters Research Institute 

American Die Casting Institute 

Copper Development Association, Inc. 

Copper Institute 

Forging Industry Association 

Investment Casting Institute 

Lead Industries Association, Inc. 

Magnesium Association 

Non-Ferrous Founders' Society 

Open Die Forging Institute 

Zinc Institute, Inc. 

(Industry 3391 ) 

Forging Industry Association 
Open Die Forging Institute 

(Industries 3399, 3471, and 3479) 

Aluminum Association 

Metal Powder Industries Federation 



(Industries 3331 to 3334, 3339, and 3341 ) 

Aluminum Association 

Aluminum Smelters Research Institute 

Copper Development Association, Inc. 

Copper Institute 

Lead Industries Association, Inc. 

Magnesium Association 

Zinc Institute, Inc. 



(Industry 3351) 

Copper Development Association, Inc. 

Copper Institute 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 34 (Fabricated Metal Products, Except 
Ordnance, Machinery, and Transportation Equipment) 

(Industry 3421) 

Aluminum Association 

American Cutlery Manufacturers Association 



(Industries 3423 and 3425) 

Aluminum Association 

American Hardware Manufacturers Association 

Hack and Band Saw Manufacturers Association of America 

National Builders Hardware Association 



104 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



MAJOR GROUP 34 (Fabricated Metal Products, Except 
Ordnance, Machinery, and Transportation Equipment)— Con. 



MAJOR GROUP 34 (Fabricated Metal Products, Except 
Ordnance, Machinery, and Transportation Equipment)— Con. 



(Industry 3429) 

Aluminum Association 

American Hardward Manufacturers Association 
Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association 
National Builders Hardware Association 

(Industry 3431) 

Plumbing Fixture Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3432) 

Plumbing Brass Institute 

Plumbing Fixture Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3433) 

Aluminum Association 

American Boiler Manufacturers Association 

Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Institute of Boiler & Radiator Manufacturers 

National Oil Fuel Institute, Inc. 

National Warm Air Heating & Air Conditioning Association 

Plumbing Fixtures Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3441 and 3442) 

Aluminum Association 

Aluminum Extruders Council 

American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 

Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association 

Hollow Metal Door & Buck Association 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

(Industry 3443) 

Aluminum Association 

American Boiler Manufacturers Association 

Institute of Boiler & Radiator Manufacturers 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

National LP-Gas Association 

Steel Plate Fabricators Association 

Steel Tank Institute 

Welded Steel Tube Institute 

(Industries 3444, 3446, and 3449) 

Aluminum Association, 

Aluminum Siding Association 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

Metal Building Manufacturers Association 

Metal Lath Association 

National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers 

National Association of Sheet Metal Distributors 

Steel Door Institute 

(Industries 3451 and 3452) 

Industrial Fasteners Institute 

National Screw Machine Products Association 

Socket Screw Products Bureau 

U.S. Wood Screw Service Bureau 



(Industry 3461 ) 

Aluminum Association 

Galvanized Ware Manufacturers Council 

Metal Cookware Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3481) 

Aluminum Association 

American Wire Rope Manufacturers Association 

Bright Wire Goods Manufacturers Service Bureau 

Industrial Wire Cloth Institute 

Insect Wire Screening Bureau 

National Association of Chain Manufacturers 

Spring Manufacturers Institute 

Wire Association, Inc. 

Wire Reinforcement Institute 

(Industries 3492 and 3499) 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

Metal Ladder Manufacturers Association 

Safe Manufacturers National Association 

(Industry 3493) 

Spring Manufacturers Institute 

(Industry 3494) 

Aluminum Association 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

National Gas Association 

Scientific Apparatus Makers Association 

Valve Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3496 and 3497) 

Aluminum Association 

Aluminum Foil Container Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3498) 

Aluminum Association 

American Pipe Fittings Association 

Pipe Fabrication Institute 

MAJOR GROUP 35 (Machinery, Except Electrical) 
(Industry 3511) 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3513) 

Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers 
Laundry & Cleaners Allied Trades Association 
National Automatic Laundry & Cleaning Council 
National Automatic Merchandising Association 

(Industry 3514) 

Commercial Refrigerator Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3516) 

National Tool, Die, & Precision Machining Association 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



105 



MAJOR GROUP 35 (Machinery, Except Electrical)-Con. 

(Industry 3519) 

Automobile Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
Diesel Engine Manufacturers Association 
Machinery & Allied Products Institute 

(Industry 3522) 

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute, Inc. 

(Industry 3531) 

Construction Industry Manufacturers Association 
Farm & Industrial Equipment Institute 

(Industry 3532) 

American Mining Congress 
Machinery & Allied Products Institute 

(Industry 3533) 

Aluminum Association 

American Petroleum Institute 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3534) 

Aluminum Association 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3535 to 3537) 

Conveyor Equipment Manufacturers Association 

Electric Overhead Crane Institute, Inc. 

Hoist Manufacturers Institute 

Material Handling Institute, Inc. 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3541 and 3542) 

Machinery & Allied Products Institute 

Metal Cutting Tool Institute 

National Machine Tool Builders' Association 

(Industries 3544, 3545, and 3548) 

Aluminum Association 

Cemented Carbide Producers Association 

Cutting Tool Manufacturers Association 

Metal Cutting Tool Institute 

National Machine Tool Builders Association 

National Tool, Die, Precision Machinery Association 

National Welding Supply Association 

(Industries 3551 to 3553) 

American Textile Machinery Association 

Bakery Equipment Manufacturers Association 

Knitting Machine Manufacturers Association of the U.S.A. 

National Association of Dairy Equipment Manufacturers 

Packaging Institute, Inc. 

Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 35 (Machinery, Except Electrical)-Con. 

(Industries 3554 and 3555) 

Aluminum Association 

International Typographic Composition Association 
National Printing Equipment Association, Inc. 
Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 
Rubber Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3559 and 3576) 

Foundry Equipment Manufacturers Association 
Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 
Scale Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3561) 

Hydraulic Institute 

Machinery & Allied Products Institute 

Water Systems Council 

(Industry 3562) 

Anti-Friction Bearing Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Cast Bronze Bearing Institute 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3564) 

Air-Conditioning & Refrigeration Institute 
Air Moving & Conditioning Association, Inc. 

(Industry 3566) 

Aluminum Association 

American Gear Manufacturers Association 

American Sprocket Chain Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3567) 

Aluminum Association 

Industrial Heating Equipment Association 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3569) 

Aluminum Association 

Packaging Institute, Inc. 

Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute 

Process Equipment Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3571, 3572, and 3579) 

Business Equipment Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

(Industry 3586) 

Gasoline Pump Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 36 (Electrical Machinery, Equipment, and 
Supplies) 

(Industry 3612) 

Aluminum Association 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 



106 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



MAJOR GROUP 36 (Electrical Machinery, Equipment, 
and Supplies)— Continued 

(Industries 3623 and 3624) 

Aluminum Association 
Machinery & Allied Products Institute 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
National Welding Supply Association 
Resistance Welder Manufacturers Association 



(Industry 3629) 

Aluminum Association 

Edison Electric Institute 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 



(Industries 3631 and 3632) 

Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 37 (Transportation Equipment)-Continued 

(Industry 3717) 

Aluminum Association 

American Safety Belt Council, Inc. 

Automobile Seat Cover Association of America 

Automotive Accessories Manufacturers of America 

Automotive Affiliated Representatives 

Automotive Air Conditioning Association 

Automotive Electric Association ' 

Automotive Engine Rebuilders 

Automotive Exhaust Research Institute 

Automotive Lift Institute 

Automotive Parts Rebuilders Association 

Automotive Service Industry Association 

Automotive Trade Association Managers 

Automotive Warehouse Distributors Association 

Equipment and Tool Institute 

Ignition Manufacturers Institute 

Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association 



(Industries 3633, 3635, 3636, and 3639) 

Aluminum Association 
Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association 
Laundry & Cleaners Allied Trades Association 
Machinery & Allied Products Institute 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 
Sewing Machine Trade Association 
Vacuum Cleaner Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3634) 

Aluminum Association 

(Industry 3652) 

Record Industry Association of America 

(Industry 3661) 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3691 and 3692) 

Association of American Battery Manufacturers 
National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3694 and 3699) 

Aluminum Association 

Automobile Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

Automotive Electric Association 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

MAJOR GROUP 37 (Transportation Equipment) 
(Industries 3713 and 3717) 

American Trucking Associations, Inc. 
Automobile Manufacturers Association, Inc. 
Truck Body and Equipment Association, Inc. 



(Industries 3731 and 3732) 

Aluminum Association 

American Bureau of Shipping 

National Association of Engine and Boat Manufacturers, Inc. 

Outboard Motor Manufacturers Association 

Shipbuilders Council of America 

(Industries 3741 and 3742) 

Association of American Railroads 

(Industries 3751 and 3799) 

Aluminum Association 

Bicycle Institute of America 

Mobile Homes Manufacturers Association 

Motorcycle, Scooter, and Allied Trades Association 

(Industry 3791) 

Aluminum Association 

Mobile Homes Manufacturers Association 



MAJOR GROUP 38 (Professional, Scientific, and Controlling 
Instruments; Photographic and Optical Goods; Watches and 
Clocks) 

(Industry 3841) 

American Surgical Trade Association 
Medical Surgical Manufacturers Association 

(Industries 3842 and 3843) 

Aluminum Association 

American Dental Trade Association 

American Orthoptics and Prosthetics Association 

Dental Manufacturers of America 

Industrial Safety Equipment Association, Inc. 

Medical Surgical Manufacturers Association 

National Electrical Manufacturers Association 

Optical Manufacturers Association 

Scientific Apparatus Makers Association 



CONSULTATION AND MEETINGS ON CENSUS INQUIRIES 



107 



MAJOR GROUP 38 (Professional Scientific, and Controlling 
Instruments; Photographic and Optical Goods, Watches 
and Clocks)— Continued 

(Industry 3851) 

Aluminum Association 

Optical Manufacturers Association 

(Industry 3861) 

International Association of Blueprint and Allied Industries 
National Association of Blueprint and Diazotype Coaters 
National Association of Photographic Manufacturers, Inc. 

(Industries 3871 and 3872) 

Aluminum Association 
American Watch Association, Inc. 



MAJOR GROUP 39 (Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries) 

(Industries 3911 to 391 3, and 3961) 

Aluminum Association 

Jewelry Industry Council 

Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths of America, Inc. 

(Industry 3914) 

Aluminum Association 
Jewelry Industry Council 

(Industries 3941 to 3943) 

National Association of Doll Manufacturers 
Toy Manufacturers of America, Inc. 



MAJOR GROUP 39 (Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries) 
—Continued 

(Industry 3949) 

Aluminum Association 

Athletic Goods Manufacturers Association 

Toy Manufacturers of America, Inc. 

(Industries 3951 to 3953, and 3955) 

Marking Device Association 

Pencil Makers Association 

Writing Instrument Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

(Industries 3963 and 3964) 

Aluminum Association 
Slide Fastener Association 

(Industries 3981 to 3984, 3987, 3988, 3992, and 3995) 

American Brush Manufacturers Association 
Casket Manufacturers Association of America 
National Concrete Burial Vault Association 
Rubber Manufacturers Association, Inc. 

(Industry 3993) 

Aluminum Association 

National Electric Sign Association 

(Industry 3999) 

Aluminum Association 

Beauty & Barber Supply Institute 

Fire Equipment Manufacturers Association 

National Beauty & Barber Manufacturers Association 



Appendix C 



CHRONOLOGY OF MAJOR EVENTS 



1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, Mineral 
Industries, and Construction Industries 



Operation 



PREPARATION OF MAILING 
LIST 

Multiunit precanvass mailing list 

Mailing list for censuses 

Address reference file (for 

geographic coding) 

PUBLIC-USE FORMS 

Forms design and printing . . . . 



PREMAILING OPERATIONS 

Imprinting labels, preparation of 
packages, and labeling 
operation 

Geographic area coding 

DATA COLLECTION 

Questionnaire mailing 

Mail receipt and check-in 

Correspondence 

Receipt of administrative records 



DATA PROCESSING 

Prepunch screening 

Geographic area coding 

Administrative records processing. 
Multiunit coverage processing . . . 



Beginning 
date 



Mar. 1967 
Aug. 1967 

Apr. 1965 



Nov. 1966 



Jan. 1968 
Feb. 1968 



Jan. 1968 

Jan. 1968 

Dec. 1967 

May 1968 



Mar. 1968 

Nov. 1968 

May 1968 

Mar. 1968 



Completion 
date 



Feb. 1968 
Apr. 1968 

Mar. 1968 



May 1968 



Apr. 1968 
Apr. 1968 



Apr. 1968 

Nov. 1968 

Jan. 1969 

Nov. 1968 



Oct. 1968 

Jan. 1969 

Jan. 1969 

Feb. 1969 



Operation 


Beginning 
date 


Completion 
date 


DATA PROCESSING-Continued 

Punching: 

Business 


June 
July 

July 

Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 

Oct. 
Dec. 

Jan. 

Mar. 
Mar. 

July 

Mar. 
Sept. 

May 


1968 
1968 

1968 

1968 
1968 

1968 

1968 
1968 

1969 

1969 
1969 

1969 

1969 
1969 

1969 


Jan. 
Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 
Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 
Mar. 

June 

Dec. 
Aug. 

Dec. 

Feb. 
Dec. 


1969 


Construction 


1969 


Manufactures and mineral 

industries 


1969 


Computer editing: 

Business 


1969 


Construction 

Manufactures and mineral 

industries 

Reject review and correction: 


1969 
1969 

1969 


Manufactures and mineral 

Computer tabulations: 

Business 


1969 
1969 
1970 


Construction 


1970 


Manufactures and mineral 

industries 

PUBLICATION OF MAJOR 
CENSUS REPORTS 

Business 


1970 
1971 


Construction 

Manufactures and mineral 

industries 


1970 
) 



Some business and manufactures and many mineral industries re- 
ports were still in preparation as of May 1971. For specific publication 
dates of all reports, see Appendix H, "Published Census Reports." 



108 



Appendix D 



DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE 1967 AND 1963 STANDARD 
INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION 



1967 Industry 



Equivalent 1963 Industry 



Code 



Short title 



Code 



Short title 



01 1 

0114 

0119 

0133 

0134 

0135 

0136 

0141 



1422 
1423 
1429 
1442 
1446 



2815 

3399 
3573 
3574 

399 

3991 2 
3994 2 
3996 2 



3999 



AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND FISHERIES 

Agricultural Production 

Tobacco 

Field crops, nee 

Broiler chickens 

Poultry, except broiler chickens 

Beef cattle 

Hogs 

General farms 

MINING 

Crushed and broken limestone 

Crushed and broken granite 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 

Construction sand and gravel 

Industrial sand 

MANUFACTURING 

Cyclic intermediates and crudes 

Primary metal products, nee 

Electronic computing equipment 

Calculating and accounting machines 

Miscellaneous manufacturers 

Brooms and brushes 

Morticians' goods 

Hard surface floor coverings 

Manufactures, nee 



01 
02 
0119 

0133 

0139 

0142 
0143 
0144 



1421 
1441 



2814 
2815 

3399 
3571 

398 

399 

3981 

3988 

3982 

3983 
3984 
3987 
3992 
3995 
3999 



Commercial farms. 
Noncommercial farms. 

Field crop farms, nee. 
Poultry farms. 

Livestock farms, nee. 

General farms— primarily crop. 
General farms— primarily livestock. 
General crop and livestock farms. 



Crushed and broken stone, including riprap. 



Sand and gravel. 



Cyclic (coal tar) crudes. 

Dyes, dye (cyclic) intermediates, and organic 

pigments. 
Primary metal industries, nee 
Computing and accounting machines, including cash 

registers. 
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries. 
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries. 
Brooms and brushes. 
Morticians' goods. 
Linoleum, asphalted-felt-base, and other hard 

surface floor coverings, nee. 
Matches. 
Candles. 
Lamp shades. 
Furs, dressed and dyed. 
Umbrellas, parasols, and canes. 
Manufacturing industries, nee. 



1 Major Groups 01 and 02 are combined for 1 967. Each industry in 01 for that year may thus include establishments formerly in 02. 

2 Industry is identical in both years but with a different code. 



109 



110 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



1967 Industry 



Equivalent 1963 Industry 



Code 



Short title 



Code 



Short title 



5033 

5034 

5036 

5037 

504 1 2 

5042 

5049 

5052 

5053 

5054 

5059 

5081 

5082 

5084 

5085 

5092 



5099 

5591 
5592 
5599 
5995 

5999 



6112 
6113 
6552 
6553 



7213 
7218 

7271 

7313 
7319 
7391 
7397 
7398 
7399 
7512 
7513 
7519 
7523 
7525 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE 

Piece goods 

Notions and other dry goods 

Men's clothing and furnishings 

Women's and children's clothing 

Groceries, general line 

Frozen foods 

Groceries and related products, nee 

Cotton 

Grain 

Livestock 

Farm product raw materials, nee 

Commercial machines and equipment 

Construction and mining machinery 

Industrial machinery and equipment 

Industrial supplies 

Petroleum and petroleum products 

Wholesalers, nee 

Boat dealers 

Household trailer dealers 

Automotive dealers, nee 

Hobby, toy, and game shops 

Miscellaneous retail stores, nee 



[ 5032 

f 5035 

5042 

j 5049 

} 5051 

> 5082 

5092 

5099pt. 

5099pt. 

5599 

5999pt. 
5998pt. 

5999pt. 



FINANCE, INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

Rediscounting, not for agriculture 

Rediscounting, for agriculture 

Subdividers and developers, nee 

Cemetery subdividers and developers 



SERVICES 

Linen supply 

Industrial launderers 

Garment pressing, alteration, repair . 

Radio, TV, publisher representatives. 

Miscellaneous advertising 

Research & development laboratories 
Commercial testing laboratories 

Temporary help supply service 

Business services, nee 

Passenger car rental and leasing 

Truck rental and leasing 

Utility and house trailer rental 

Parking lots 

Parking structures 



6111 
| 6551 



7213 



Dry goods, piece goods, and notions. 

Apparel and accessories, hosiery, and lingerie. 

Groceries, general line. 

Groceries and related products, nee. 

Farm products— raw materials. 



Commercial and industrial machinery, equipment 
and supplies 

Petroleum bulk stations and terminals. 
Wholesalers, nee (petroleum products other than 

bulk station). 
Wholesalers, nee (except petroleum products other 

than bulk station). 
Miscellaneous aircraft, marine, and automotive 

dealers. 
Miscellaneous retail stores, nee. 
Optical goods stores (optical goods stores, exc. 

registered optometrists selling glasses). 
Miscellaneous retail stores, nee (exc. hobby, toy, and 

game shops). 



Rediscount and financing institutions for credit 
agencies, other banks. 

Subdividers and developers. 



Linen supply and industrial launderers. 

Pressing, alteration, and garment repair. 
Fur repair and storage. 

Miscellaneous advertising. 

Research, development, and testing laboratories. 

Business services, nee. 

Automobile rentals, without drivers. 

Automobile parking. 



DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 1967 AND 1963 STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION 



111 



Code 



7530 



7542 
7549 
7623 
7629 

7692 
7813 
7814 
7815 
7816 
7817 
7818 
7832 
7833 
7922 
7929 
7932 
7933 
7943 
7946 
7949 

8099 



1967 Industry 



Short title 



SERVICES-Continued 



Automobile repair shops, nee 

Automobile laundries 

Automobile services, nee 

Refrigerator service and repair 

Electrical repair shops, nee 

Welding repair 

Motion picture production, except TV . 
Motion picture production for TV 

Production of still, slide films 

Motion picture film exchanges 

Film or tape distribution for TV 

Motion picture distribution services . . 
Motion picture theaters, except drive-in 

Drive-in motion picture theaters 

Theatrical producers and services 

Entertainers & entertainment groups . . 

Billiard and pool establishments 

Bowling alleys 

Coin-operated amusement devices 

Amusement parks 

Amusement and recreation, nee 

Health and allied services, nee 




Equivalent 1963 Industry 



Short title 



Battery and ignition repair and service shops. 
Radiator repair shops. 
Glass replacement and repair shops. 
Automobile repair shops, nee. 

Automobile services, except repair. 

Electrical repair shops. 

Repair shops and related services, nee. 

Motion picture production. 

Motion picture distribution. 

Motion picture theaters. 

Theatrical producers (except motion pictures), 

bands, orchestras, and entertainers. 
Bowling, billiards, and pool. 

Amusement and recreation services, nee. 

Optical goods stores (optometrists selling glasses) 
Health and allied services, nee. 



Appendix E 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 



REGIONS AND DIVISIONS 

Regions and divisions are large geographic areas which have been 
used for many decades for the purpose of providing summary 
figures at levels intermediate between those for the United 
States and those for individual States. The divisions are group- 
ings of contiguous States. The regions are composed of groups 
of divisions. (See page 1 14 for map showing regions and 
divisions.) 

The following outline identifies the regions and divisions and 
the States which they comprise. 



NORTHEAST REGION 

New England Division 
Maine 

New Hampshire 
Vermont 
Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Division 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

SOUTH REGION 

South Atlantic Division 
Delaware 
Maryland 

District of Columbia 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 

East South Central Division 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 
Mississippi 

West South Central Division 
Arkansas 
Louisiana 
Oklahoma 
Texas 



NORTH CENTRAL REGION 

East North Central Division 
Ohio 
Indiana 
Illinois 
Michigan 
Wisconsin 

West North Central Division 
Minnesota 
Iowa 
Missouri 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 
Kansas 



WEST REGION 

Mountain Division 
Montana 
Idaho 
Wyoming 
Colorado 
New Mexico 
Arizona 
Utah 
Nevada 



Pacific Division 
Washington 
Oregon 
California 
Alaska 
Hawaii 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL 
AREAS (SMSA's) 

The concept of standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSA's) 
has been developed to meet the need for the presentation of 
general-purpose statistics by agencies of the Federal Govern- 
ment, in accordance with specific criteria for defining such 
areas. On the basis of these criteria, the geographical boundaries 
of the areas are established by the Office of Statistical Standards 
in the Office of Management and Budget, with the advice of 
representatives of the major Federal statistical agencies. 

An SMSA consists of a county or group of counties contain- 
ing at least one city (or twin cities) having 50,000 inhabitants or 
more, plus adjacent counties that are metropolitan in character 
and are economically and socially integrated with the central 
city. (In New England, towns and cities rather than counties are 
the units used in defining an SMSA.) The name of the central 
city is used as the name of the SMSA. There is no limit to the 
number of adjacent counties included in the SMSA as long as 
the counties are integrated with the central city, nor is an SMSA 
limited to one State; its boundaries can cross State lines, as do 
the boundaries of the Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va. SMSA. (See list 
of SMSA's as of January 15, 1968, p. 116) 



Standard consolidated areas (SCA's)— In view of the special 
importance of the metropolitan complexes around the Nation's 
two largest cities. New York and Chicago, several contiguous 
SMSA's and additional counties that do not appear to meet the 
formal integration criteria but do have strong interrelationships 
of other kinds, have been combined into (1) the New York- 
Northeastern New Jersey and (2) the Chicago-Northwestern 
Indiana Standard Consolidated Areas, respectively. 



COUNTIES 

The primary political administrative divisions of the States are 
counties, except in Louisiana and Alaska. In Louisiana these 
divisions are called parishes. In Alaska there are no counties; for 
this State, census statistics are shown for its census divisions and 
organized boroughs, which are the nearest equivalent to 
counties. In Maryland, Missouri, and Virginia there are a number 
of cities which are independent of any county organization and 
thus constitute primary divisions of their States (namely, 
Baltimore City in Maryland, St. Louis in Missouri, and 37 cities 
in Virginia). 



112 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 



113 



PLACES (CITIES AND OTHER INCORPORATED AND 
UNINCORPORATED PLACES) 

The term "place" refers to a concentration of population, 
regardless of the existence of legally prescribed units, powers, or 
functions. However, most of the places identified in the census 
are incorporated as cities, towns, villages, or boroughs. In ad- 
dition, the larger unincorporated places were delineated. 

Incorporated places— Statistics for most cities and some other 
incorporated places are provided in the reports of about half of 
the major censuses. Statistics for incorporated places of all types 
and sizes are given in the population and housing census reports, 
and the figures for larger cities are quite detailed. The other 
censuses have provided information for incorporated places of 
larger than a specified size— 2,500 inhabitants in the census of 
governments and the retail trade and selected services segments 
of the census of business, 5,000 in the wholesale trade segment 
of the census of business, and 10,000 in the census of manufac- 
turers. In the business census reports, statistics are shown for 
certain towns and townships which are not usually classified as 
incorporated places: Towns in the New England States which 
had an urban population of 2,500 or more inhabitants (5,000 
for the wholesale trade segment) or a total population of 10,000 
or more; and townships in New Jersey and Pennsylvania which 
had 10,000 or more inhabitants. 



It was recognized that the tract basis for CBD's might lead to 
the inclusion of area segments not consistent with the first 
criterion or to the exclusion of small segments which clearly 
belonged within the first criterion. It was believed that these 
shortcomings generally would not prove to be serious and that 
the differences would not significantly affect the totals for the 
items being measured. Provision, however, was made for split- 
ting tracts where a serious problem was encountered. 

MAJOR RETAIL CENTERS (MRC's) 

Major retail centers (MRC's) are concentrations of retail stores 
located in an SMSA but not in the central business district of 
the chief city of the SMSA. To be considered an MRC, a shop- 
ping area has to contain at least one major general merchandise 
store— usually a department store. MRC's include not only the 
planned suburban shopping centers but also the older "string" 
street and neighborhood developments which meet the pre- 
requisites. Frequently the boundaries of a single MRC include 
stores located within a planned shopping center as well as 
adjacent stores outside the planned portion. In general the 
boundaries of the MRC's have been established to include all the 
adjacent blocks containing at least one store in the general 
merchandise, apparel, or furniture-appliance groups of stores. In 
some cases, MRC's are defined as census tracts. The business 
census is the only source of statistics for major retail centers. 



Unincorporated places— An unincorporated place is a densely 
settled population center which is not incorporated. 



CENSUS TRACTS 

Census tracts are small relatively permanent areas into which 
large cities and adjacent areas have been divided for the purpose 
of showing comparable small-area statistics. Census tract 
boundaries are selected by a local committee and approved by 
the Bureau of the Census. Census tracts are designed to be 
relatively homogeneous in population characteristics, economic 
status, and living conditions; the average tract has about 4,000 
residents. Because they are relatively permanent areas, census 
tracts are also used extensively by local agencies in tabulating 
their own statistics. Census tract statistics can be tabulated from 
the information collected in the business census, but no tract 
statistics were published for the 1967 Economic Censuses. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICTS (CBD's) 

The central business district (CBD) is usually the downtown 
retail trade area. The purpose of defining the CBD is to provide 
a basis for comparing changes in business activity in the CBD 
with changes in the remainder of the metropolitan area or of the 
central city. 

Since there were no generally accepted rules for determining 
what a CBD area should include or exclude, the Census Bureau 
(1 ) provided a general characterization of the CBD as an area of 
very high land valuation; an area characterized by a high con- 
centration of retail businesses, offices, theaters, hotels, and 
service businesses; and an area of high traffic flow; and (2) 
usually required that the CBD should be defined to follow 
existing tract lines, that is, to consist of one or more census 
tracts. Generally, CBD's have been defined only in cities with a 
population of 100,000 inhabitants or more. 



OTHER SPECIAL-PURPOSE DISTRICTS 

Some Census Bureau publications show statistics for areas 
defined for special purposes. Examples of such areas follow. 
Detailed descriptions of these areas can usually be found in the 
publication showing the statistics for these areas. 

Production areas (25) are used in some of the reports from 
the census of transportation. They are essentially single SMSA's 
or clusters of SMSA's selected to represent relatively large but 
geographically compact concentrations of industrial activity. Oil 
and gas districts in California, Louisiana, Texas, and New 
Mexico are made up of counties. Statistics for the 17 districts in 
these States have been shown in the reports on petroleum and 
natural gas industries from the census of mineral industries. 

Special-purpose areas defined by other Federal agencies are 
used in appropriate Census Bureau reports. Statistics for 10 
fishing regions (as defined by the Department of Interior) are 
given in the report from the 1967 Census of Commercial 
Fisheries. Statistics for eight petroleum regions (as defined by 
the Departments of Defense and Interior and by the 
Executive Office of the President) are given in a report from the 
census of business on one of the wholesale trade businesses, 
Petroleum Bulk Stations and Terminals. Statistics for 20 
industrial water-use regions (defined by a Federal interagency 
committee) are given in a subject report from the census of 
manufactures, Water Use in Manufacturing. 



PUERTO RICO AND OTHER OUTLYING AREAS 

Information for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, and Guam is published in the 
reports of the censuses of agriculture, population, housing, 
business, manufactures, and mineral industries. 



114 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



CO 

■D 
o 



Q 
u 

I 

(0 

9 

O 

^D 
C 






a 




3 
U 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 



115 



c 
a 

O 

a. 
o 



35 



LU 

a 
C9 




M^ 


i 

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116 1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 

(Area titles and definitions of the two Standard Consolidated Areas and the 230 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United 
States as of January 15, 1968) 

Chicago, III.— Northwestern Indiana Consists of Chicago, III., and Gary— Hammond— East Chicago, Ind., Standard 

Standard Consolidated Area Metropolitan Statistical Areas 

New York, N.Y. -Northeastern New Jersey Consists of the following Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas: New York, 

Standard Consolidated Area N.Y.; Newark, N.J.; Jersey City, N.J.; Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, N.J.; and 

of Middlesex and Somerset Counties, N.J. 

Abilene, Tex Consists of Jones and Taylor Counties, Tex. 

Akron, Ohio Consists of Portage and Summit Counties, Ohio 

Albany, Ga Coextensive with Dougherty County, Ga. 

Albany— Schenectady-Troy, N.Y Consists of Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady Counties, N.Y. 

Albuquerque, N. Mex Coextensive with Bernalillo County, N. Mex. 

Allentown— Bethlehem— Easton, Pa.— N.J Consists of Lehigh and Northampton Counties, Pa.; and Warren County, N.J. 

Altoona, Pa Coextensive with Blair County, Pa. 

Amarillo, Tex Consists of Potter and Randall Counties, Tex. 

Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif Coextensive with Orange County, Calif. 

Anderson, Ind Coextensive with Madison County, Ind. 

Ann Arbor, Mich Coextensive with Washtenaw County, Mich. 

Asheville, N.C Coextensive with Buncombe County, N.C. 

Atlanta, Ga Consists of Clayton, Cobb, De Kalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties, Ga. 

Atlantic City, N.J Coextensive with Atlantic County, N.J. 

Augusta, Ga.-S.C Consists of Richmond County, Ga., and Aiken County, S.C. 

Austin, Tex Coextensive with Travis County, Tex. 

Bakersfield, Calif Coextensive with Kern County, Calif. 

Baltimore, Md Consists of Baltimore city and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, 

and Howard Counties, Md. 

Baton Rouge, La Coextensive with East Baton Rouge Parish, La. 

Bay City, Mich Coextensive with Bay County, Mich. 

Beaumont— Port Arthur— Orange, Tex Consists of Jefferson and Orange Counties, Tex. 

Billings, Mont Coextensive with Yellowstone County, Mont. 

Biloxi— Gulfport, Miss Coextensive with Harrison County, Miss. 

Binghamton, N.Y. —Pa Consists of Broome and Tioga Counties, N.Y., and Susquehanna County, Pa. 

Birmingham, Ala Consists of Jefferson, Shelby, and Walker Counties, Ala. 

Bloomington— Normal, III Coextensive with McLean County, III. 

Boise City, Idaho Coextensive with Ada County, Idaho 

Boston, Mass Consists of all of Suffolk County; Beverly, Lynn, Peabody,and Salem cities, 

and Danvers, Hamilton, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Middleton, 
Nahant, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, and Wenham towns in Essex 
County; Cambridge, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, Somer- 
ville, Waltham, and Woburn cities, and Arlington, Ashland, Bedford, 
Belmont, Burlington, Concord, Framingham, Lexington, Lincoln, Natick, 
North Reading, Reading, Sherbom, Stoneham, Sudbury, Wakefield, Water- 
town, Wayland, Weston, Wilmington, and Winchester towns in Middlesex 
County; Quincy city, and Braintree, Brookline, Canton, Cohasset, 
Dedham, Dover, Holbrook, Medfield, Millis, Milton, Needham, Norfolk, 
Norwood, Randolph, Sharon, Walpole, Wellesley, Westwood, and Wey- 
mouth towns in Norfolk County; and Duxbury, Hanover, Hingham, Hull, 
Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Rockland, and Scituate towns in 
Plymouth County, Mass. 

Bridgeport, Conn Consists of Bridgeport and Shelton cities, and Easton, Fairfield, Monroe, 

Stratford, and Trumbull towns in Fairfield County; and Milford city in 
New Haven County, Conn. 

Brockton, Mass Consists of Easton town in Bristol County; Avon and Stoughton towns in 

Norfolk County; and Brockton city, and Abington, Bridgewater, East 
Bridgewater, Hanson, West Bridgewater, and Whitman towns in Plymouth 
County, Mass. 

Brownsville— Harlingen— San Benito, Tex Coextensive with Cameron County, Tex. 

Buffalo, N.Y Consists of Erie and Niagara Counties, N.Y. 

Canton, Ohio Coextensive with Stark County, Ohio 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa Coextensive with Linn County, Iowa 

Champaign— Urbana, III Coextensive with Champaign County, III. 

Charleston, S.C Consists of Berkeley and Charleston Counties, S.C. 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 117 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS-Continued 

Charleston, W. Va Coextensive with Kanawha County, W.Va. 

Charlotte, N.C Consists of Mecklenburg and Union Counties, N.C. 

Chattanooga, Tenn.— Ga Consists of Hamilton County, Tenn., and Walker County, Ga. 

Chicago, III Consists of Cook, Du Page, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and Will Counties, III. 

Cincinnati, Ohio— Ky.— Ind Consists of Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Boone, 

Campbell, and Kenton Counties, Ky.;and Dearborn County, Ind. 

Cleveland, Ohio Consists of Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, and Medina Counties, Ohio 

Colorado Springs, Colo Coextensive with El Paso County, Colo. 

Columbia, S.C Consists of Lexington and Richland Counties, S.C. 

Columbus Ga —Ala Consists of Chattahoochee and Muscogee Counties, Ga., and Russell County, 

Ala. 

Columbus, Ohio Consists of Delaware, Franklin, and Pickaway Counties, Ohio 

Corpus Christi, Tex Consists of Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Tex. 

Dallas Tex Consists of Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties, 

Tex. 

Davenport— Rock Island— Moline, Iowa— III Consists of Scott County, Iowa, and Henry and Rock Island Counties, III. 

Dayton, Ohio Consists of Greene, Miami, Montgomery, and Preble Counties, Ohio 

Decatur, III Coextensive with Macon County, III. 

Denver, Colo Consists of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, and Jefferson Counties, Colo. 

Des Moines, Iowa Coextensive with Polk County, Iowa 

Detroit, Mich Consists of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne Counties, Mich. 

Dubuque, Iowa Coextensive with Dubuque County, Iowa 

Duluth— Superior, Minn.— Wis Consists of St. Louis County, Minn., and Douglas County, Wis. 

Durham, N.C Consists of Durham and Orange Counties, N.C. 

El Paso, Tex Coextensive with El Paso County, Tex. 

Erie, Pa Coextensive with Erie County, Pa. 

Eugene, Oreg Coextensive with Lane County, Oreg. 

Evansville, Ind.— Ky Consists of Vanderburgh and Warrick Counties, Ind., and Henderson County, 

Ky. 

Fall River, Mass.— R.I Consists of Fall River city, and Somerset, Swansea, and Westport towns in 

Bristol County, Mass.; and Tiverton town in Newport County, R.I. 

Fargo— Moorhead, N. Dak.— Minn Consists of Cass County, N. Dak., and Clay County, Minn. 

Fayetteville, N.C Coextensive with Cumberland County, N.C. 

Fitchburg— Leominster, Mass Consists of Shirley and Townsend towns in Middlesex County; and Fitchburg 

and Leominster cities, and Lunenburg and Westminster towns in Worcester 
County, Mass. 

Flint, Mich Consists of Genesee and Lapeer Counties, Mich. 

Fort Lauderdale— Hollywood, Fla Coextensive with Broward County, Fla. 

Fort Smith, Ark.— Okla Consists of Crawford and Sebastian Counties, Ark.; and LeFlore and 

Sequoyah Counties, Okla. 

Fort Wayne, Ind Coextensive with Allen County, Ind. 

Fort Worth, Tex Consists of Johnson and Tarrant Counties, Tex. 

Fresno, Calif Coextensive with Fresno County, Calif. 

Gadsden, Ala Coextensive with Etowah County, Ala. 

Galveston— Texas City, Tex Coextensive with Galveston County, Tex. 

Gary— Hammond— East Chicago, Ind Consists of Lake and Porter Counties, Ind. 

Grand Rapids, Mich Consists of Kent and Ottawa Counties, Mich. 

Great Falls, Mont Coextensive with Cascade County, Mont. 

Green Bay, Wis Coextensive with Brown County, Wis. 

Greensboro— Winston-Salem— High Point, N.C. Consists of Forsyth, Guilford, Randolph, and Yadkin Counties, N.C. 

Greenville, S.C Consists of Greenville and Pickens Counties, S.C. 

Hamilton— Middletown, Ohio Coextensive with Butler County, Ohio 

Harrisburg, Pa Consists of Cumberland, Dauphin, and Perry Counties, Pa. 

Hartford, Conn Consists of Hartford city, and Avon, Bloomfield, Canton, East Granby, East 

Hartford, East Windsor, Enfield, Farmington, Glastonbury, Granby, 
Manchester, Newington, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, Suffield, 
West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, and Windsor Locks towns in Hart- 
ford County; Cromwell town in Middlesex County; and Andover, Bolton, 
Coventry, Ellington, and Vernon towns in Tolland County, Conn. 

Honolulu, Hawaii Coextensive with Honolulu County, Hawaii 

Houston, Tex Consists of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Harris, Liberty, and Montgomery Counties, Tex. 

Huntington— Ashland, W. Va.— Ky.— Ohio Consists of Cabell and Wayne Counties, W. Va.; Boyd County, Ky.; and 

Lawrence County, Ohio 



118 1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS-Continued 

Huntsville, Ala Consists of Limestone and Madison Counties, Ala. 

Indianapolis, Ind Consists of Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, Morgan, 

and Shelby Counties, Ind. 

Jackson, Mich Coextensive with Jackson County, Mich. 

Jackson, Miss Consists of Hinds and Rankin Counties, Miss. 

Jacksonville, Fla Coextensive with Duval County, Fla. 

Jersey City, N.J Coextensive with Hudson County, N.J. 

Johnstown, Pa Consists of Cambria and Somerset Counties, Pa. 

Kalamazoo, Mich Coextensive with Kalamazoo County, Mich. 

Kansas City, Mo.— Kans Consists of Cass, Clay, Jackson, and Platte Counties, Mo.; and Johnson and 

Wyandotte Counties, Kans. 

Kenosha, Wis Coextensive with Kenosha County, Wis. 

Knoxville, Tenn Consists of Anderson, Blount, and Knox Counties, Tenn. 

Lafayette, La Coextensive with Lafayette Parish, La. 

Lafayette— West Lafayette, Ind Coextensive with Tippecanoe County, Ind. 

Lake Charles, La Coextensive with Calcasieu Parish, La. 

Lancaster, Pa Coextensive with Lancaster County, Pa. 

Lansing, Mich Consists of Clinton, Eaton, and Ingham Counties, Mich. 

Laredo, Tex Coextensive with Webb County, Tex. 

Las Vegas, Nev Coextensive with Clark County, Nev. 

Lawrence— Haverhill, Mass.— N.H Consists of Lawrence and Haverhill cities, and Andover, Georgetown, Grove- 
land, Merrimac, Methuen, North Andover, and West Newbury towns in 
Essex County, Mass.; and Newton, Plaistow, and Salem towns in Rocking- 
ham County, N.H. 

Lawton, Okla Coextensive with Comanche County, Okla. 

Lewiston— Auburn, Maine Consists of Auburn and Lewiston cities, and Lisbon town in Androscoggin 

County, Maine 

Lexington, Ky Coextensive with Fayette County, Ky. 

Lima, Ohio Consists of Allen, Putnam, and Van Wert Counties, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr Coextensive with Lancaster County, Nebr. 

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark Consists of Pulaski and Saline Counties, Ark. 

Lorain— Elyria, Ohio Coextensive with Lorain County, Ohio 

Los Angeles— Long Beach, Calif Coextensive with Los Angeles County, Calif. 

Louisville, Ky.-lnd Consists of Jefferson County, Ky.;and Clark and Floyd Counties, Ind. 

Lowell, Mass Consists of Lowell city, and Billerica, Chelmsford, Dracut, Tewksbury, 

Tyngsborough, and Westford towns in Middlesex County, Mass. 

Lubbock, Tex Coextensive with Lubbock County, Tex. 

Lynchburg, Va Consists of Lynchburg city, and Amherst and Campbell Counties, Va. 

Macon, Ga Consists of Bibb and Houston Counties, Ga. 

Madison, Wis Coextensive with Dane County, Wis. 

Manchester, N.H Consists of Manchester city, and Bedford and Goffstown towns in Hills- 
borough County; and Hooksett town in Merrimack County, N.H. 

Mansfield, Ohio Coextensive with Richland County, Ohio 

McAllen— Pharr— Edinburg, Tex Coextensive with Hidalgo County, Tex. 

Memphis, Tenn.— Ark Consists of Shelby County, Tenn., and Crittenden County, Ark. 

Meriden, Conn Coextensive with Meriden city in New Haven County, Conn. 

Miami, Fla Coextensive with Dade County, Fla. 

Midland, Tex Coextensive with Midland County, Tex. 

Milwaukee, Wis Consists of Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Washington, and Waukesha Counties, Wis. 

Minneapolis— St. Paul, Minn Consists of Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, and Washington Counties, 

Minn. 

Mobile, Ala Consists of Baldwin and Mobile Counties, Ala. 

Monroe, La Coextensive with Ouachita Parish, La. 

Montgomery, Ala Consists of Elmore and Montgomery Counties, Ala. 

Muncie, Ind Coextensive with Delaware County, Ind. 

Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Mich Coextensive with Muskegon County, Mich. 

Nashville, Tenn Consists of Davidson, Sumner, and Wilson Counties, Tenn. 

New Bedford, Mass Consists of New Bedford city, and Acushnet, Dartmouth, and Fairhaven 

towns in Bristol County; and Marion and Mattapoisett towns in Plymouth 
County, Mass. 

New Britain, Conn Consists of New Britain city, and Berlin, Plainville, and Southington towns in 

Hartford County, Conn. 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 119 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS-Continued 

New Haven, Conn Consists of New Haven city, and Bethany, Branford, East Haven, Guilford, 

Hamden, North Branford, North Haven, Orange, West Haven, and Wood- 
bridge towns in New Haven County, Conn. 

New London— Groton— Norwich, Conn Consists of New London and Norwich cities, and East Lyme, Griswold, 

Groton, Ledyard, Lisbon, Montville, Old Lyme, Preston, Sprague, Stoning- 
ton, and Waterford towns in New London County, Conn. 

New Orleans, La Consists of Jefferson, Orleans, St. Bernard, and St. Tammany Parishes, La. 

New York, N.Y Consists of New York City, and Nassau, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester 

Counties, N.Y. 

Newark, N.J Consists of Essex, Morris, and Union Counties, N.J. 

Newport News— Hampton, Va Consists of Newport News and Hampton cities, and York County, Va. 

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va Consists of Chesapeake, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Virginia Beach cities, Va. 

Norwalk, Conn Consists of Norwalk city, and Westport and Wilton towns in Fairfield County, 

Conn. 

Odessa, Tex Coextensive with Ector County, Tex. 

Ogden, Utah Coextensive with Weber County, Utah 

Oklahoma City, Okla Consists of Canadian, Cleveland, and Oklahoma Counties, Okla. 

Omaha, Nebr.— Iowa Consists of Douglas and Sarpy Counties, Nebr., and Pottawattamie County, 

Iowa. 

Orlando, Fla Consists of Orange and Seminole Counties, Fla. 

Oxnard-Ventura, Calif Coextensive with Ventura County, Calif. 

Paterson-Clifton-Passaic, N.J Consists of Bergen and Passaic Counties, N.J. 

Pensacola, Fla Consists of Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Fla. 

Peoria, III Consists of Peoria. Tazewell, and Woodford Counties, III. 

Philadelphia, Pa.— N.J Consists of Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia 

Counties, Pa., and Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties, N.J. 

Phoenix, Ariz Coextensive with Maricopa County, Ariz. 

Pine Bluff, Ark Coextensive with Jefferson County, Ark. 

Pittsburgh, Pa Consists of Allegheny, Beaver, Washington, and Westmoreland Counties, Pa. 

Pittsfield, Mass Consists of Pittsfield city, and Dalton, Lanesborough, Lee, and Lenox towns 

in Berkshire County, Mass. 

Portland Maine Consists of Portland, South Portland, and Westbrook cities, and Cape 

Elizabeth, Cumberland, Falmouth, Gorham, Scarborough, and Yarmouth 
towns in Cumberland County, Maine 

Portland, Oreg.— Wash Consists of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties, Oreg., and 

Clark County, Wash. 

Providence— Pawtucket— Warwick, R.I. —Mass Consists of all of Bristol County; Warwick city, and Coventry, East Green- 
wich, and West Warwick towns in Kent County; Jamestown town in New- 
port County; Central Falls, Cranston, East Providence, Pawtucket, 
Providence, and Woonsocket cities, and Burrillville, Cumberland, Johns- 
ton, Lincoln, North Providence, North Smithfield, and Smithfield towns 
in Providence County; and Narragansett and North Kingstown towns in 
Washington County, R.I. Also, Attleboro city and North Attleborough, 
Rehoboth, and Seekonk towns in Bristol County, Mass.; Bellingham, 
Franklin, Plainville, and Wrentham towns in Norfolk County, Mass.; and 
Blackstone and Millville towns in Worcester County, Mass. 

Provo-Orem, Utah Coextensive with Utah County, Utah 

Pueblo, Colo Coextensive with Pueblo County, Colo. 

Racine, Wis Coextensive with Racine County, Wis. 

Raleigh, N.C Coextensive with Wake County, N.C. 

Reading, Pa Coextensive with Berks County, Pa. 

Reno, Nev Coextensive with Washoe County, Nev. 

Richmond, Va Consists of Richmond city, and Chesterfield, Hanover, and Henrico Counties, 

Va. 

Roanoke, Va Consists of Roanoke and Salem cities and Roanoke County, Va. 

Rochester, N.Y Consists of Livingston, Monroe, Orleans, and Wayne Counties, N.Y. 

Rockford, III Consists of Boone and Winnebago Counties, III. 

Sacramento, Calif Consists of Placer, Sacramento, and Yolo Counties, Calif. 

Saginaw, Mich Coextensive with Saginaw County, Mich. 

St. Joseph, Mo Coextensive with Buchanan County, Mo. 

St. Louis, Mo.— Ill Consists of St. Louis city, and Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles, and St. Louis 

Counties, Mo.; and Madison and St. Clair Counties, III. 

Salem, Oreg Consists of Marion and Polk Counties, Oreg. 



120 1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS-Continued 

Salinas— Monterey, Calif Coextensive with Monterey County, Calif. 

Salt Lake City, Utah Consists of Davis and Salt Lake Counties, Utah 

San Angelo, Tex Coextensive with Tom Green County, Tex. 

San Antonio, Tex Consists of Bexar and Guadalupe Counties, Tex. 

San Bernardino— Riverside— Ontario, Calif Consists of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, Calif. 

San Diego, Calif Coextensive with San Diego County, Calif. 

San Francisco— Oakland, Calif Consists of Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, and San Mateo 

Counties, Calif. 

San Jose, Calif Coextensive with Santa Clara County, Calif. 

Santa Barbara, Calif Coextensive with Santa Barbara County, Calif. 

Savannah, Ga Coextensive with Chatham County, Ga. 

Scranton, Pa Coextensive with Lackawanna County, Pa. 

Seattle— Everett, Wash Consists of King and Snohomish Counties, Wash. 

Sherman— Denison, Tex Coextensive with Grayson County, Tex. 

Shreveport, La Consists of Bossier and Caddo Parishes, La. 

Sioux City, Iowa— Nebr Consists of Woodbury County, Iowa, and Dakota County, Nebr. 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak Coextensive with Minnehaha County, S. Dak. 

South Bend, Ind Consists of Marshall and St. Joseph Counties, Ind. 

Spokane, Wash Coextensive with Spokane County, Wash. 

Springfield, III Coextensive with Sangamon County, III. 

Springfield, Mo Coextensive with Greene County, Mo. 

Springfield, Ohio Coextensive with Clark County, Ohio 

Springfield-Chicopee-Holyoke, Mass. -Conn Consists of Chicopee, Holyoke, Springfield, and Westfield cities, and 

Agawam, East Longmeadow, Hampden, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, 
Palmer, Southwick, West Springfield, and Wilbraham towns in Hampden 
County; Northampton city and Easthampton, Granby, Hadley, and South 
Hadley towns in Hampshire County; and Warren town in Worcester 
County, Mass.; and Somers town in Tolland County, Conn. 

Stamford, Conn Consists of Stamford city, and Darien, Greenwich, and New Canaan towns in 

Fairfield County, Conn. 

Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W. Va Consists of Jefferson County, Ohio, and Brooke and Hancock Counties, W. 

Va. 

Stockton, Calif Coextensive with San Joaquin County, Calif. 

Syracuse, N.Y f Consists of Madison, Onondaga, and Oswego Counties, N.Y. 

Tacoma, Wash Coextensive with Pierce County, Wash. 

Tallahassee, Fla Coextensive with Leon County, Fla. 

Tampa— St. Petersburg, Fla Consists of Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties, Fla. 

Terre Haute, Ind Consists of Clay, Sullivan, Vermillion, and Vigo Counties, Ind. 

Texarkana, Tex.— Ark Consists of Bowie County, Tex., and Miller County, Ark. 

Toledo, Ohio— Mich Consists of Lucas and Wood Counties, Ohio, and Monroe County, Mich. 

Topeka, Kans Coextensive with Shawnee County, Kans. 

Trenton, N.J Coextensive with Mercer County, N.J. 

Tucson, Ariz Coextensive with Pima County, Ariz. 

Tulsa, Okla Consists of Creek, Osage, and Tulsa Counties, Okla. 

Tuscaloosa, Ala Coextensive with Tuscaloosa County, Ala. 

Tyler, Tex Coextensive with Smith County, Tex. 

Utica— Rome, N.Y Consists of Herkimer and Oneida Counties, N.Y. 

Vallejo— Napa, Calif Consists of Napa and Solano Counties, Calif. 

Vineland— Millville— Bridgeton, N.J Coextensive with Cumberland County, N.J. 

Waco, Tex Coextensive with McLennan County, Tex. 

Washington, D.C.— Md.— Va Consists of Washington, D.C.; Montgomery and Prince Georges Counties, Md.; 

and Alexandria, Fairfax, and Falls Church cities, and Arlington, Fairfax, 
Loudoun, and Prince William Counties, Va. 

Waterbury, Conn Consists of Thomaston, Watertown, and Woodbury towns in Litchfield 

County; and Waterbury city, Naugatuck borough, and Beacon Falls, 
Cheshire, Middlebury, Prospect, and Wolcott towns in New Haven County, 
Conn. 

Waterloo, Iowa Coextensive with Black Hawk County, Iowa 

West Palm Beach, Fla Coextensive with Palm Beach County, Fla. 

Wheeling, W. Va.— Ohio Consists of Marshall and Ohio Counties, W.Va., and Belmont County, Ohio 

Wichita, Kans Consists of Butler and Sedgwick Counties, Kans. 

Wichita Falls, Tex Consists of Archer and Wichita Counties, Tex. 



DEFINITIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREAS COVERED 121 

LIST OF STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS-Continued 

Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pa Coextensive with Luzerne County, Pa. 

Wilmington Del.— N.J. —Md Consists of New Castle County, Del., Salem County, N.J. , and Cecil County, 

Md. 

Wilmington, N.C Consists of Brunswick and New Hanover Counties, N.C. 

Worcester, Mass Consists of Worcester city, and Auburn, Berlin, Boylston, Brookfield, East 

Brookfield, Grafton, Holden, Leicester, Millbury, Northborough, North- 
bridge, North Brookfield, Oxford, Paxton, Shrewsbury, Spencer, Sterling, 
Sutton, Upton, Westborough, and West Boylston towns in Worcester 
County, Mass. 

York, Pa Consists of Adams and York Counties, Pa. 

Youngstown— Warren, Ohio Consists of Mahoning and Trumbull Counties, Ohio 



Appendix F 



LIST OF QUESTIONNAIRE FORMS 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 


NC-K1 




Company Summary Report 


NC-X1-A 




Report of Company Organization 


NC-X1-B 




Do 


NC-X1-C 




(Form letter for special out-of-scope survey) 


NC-X2 




Listing of Additional Establishments En- 
gaged in Census-Covered Activities 


NC-X3 




General Schedule 


NC-X6 




Central Administrative Offices and 
Auxiliary Establishments 


NC-K4M 




Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer 
(Multiunit) 


NC-K4S 




Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer 
(Single Unit) 


NC-K13 




Company Exploration Expenditures 

CENSUS OF BUSINESS 
QUESTIONNAIRES 

Retail (SIC Major Groups 52 to 59) 


CB-52A 


SU 


Lumber, Building Materials, Hardware 


CB-52A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-52B 


SU 


Paint, Hardware, Lumber, Building 
Materials 


CB-52B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-52C 


SU 


Hardware, Lumber, Building Materials 


CB-52C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-52D 


SU 


Lumber, Building Materials, Hardware 


CB-52D-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-53A 


SU 


Department, General Merchandise 


CB-53A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-53B 


SU 


General Merchandise 


CB-53B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-54 


SU 


Food 


CB-54-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-54B 


SU 


Bakeries 


CB-54B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-56A 


SU 


Apparel 


CB-56A-1 


MU 


Do 



SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 

122 



Form 
number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF BUSINESS 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 


CB-56B 


SU 


Shoe 


CB-56B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-57A 


SU 


Furniture, Home Furnishings, Appliances 


CB-57A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-57B 


SU 


Appliances, Furniture, Home Furnishings 


CB-57B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-57C 


SU 


Musical Instruments, Home Furnishings, 
Appliances 


CB-57C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-57D 


SU 


Home Furnishings, Furniture, Appliances 


CB-57D-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-58 


SU 


Eating and Drinking 


CB-58-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59A 


SU 


Drug Stores 


CB-59A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59B 


SU 


Book, Stationery, Miscellaneous Retailing 


CB-59B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59C 


SU 


Sporting Goods, Miscellaneous Retailing 


CB-59C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59D 


SU 


Jewelry, Miscellaneous Retailing 


CB-59D-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59E 


SU 


Miscellaneous Retailing 


CB-59E-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59F 


SU 


Cooperatives 


CB-59F-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-59G 


SU 


Optometrists, Medical, Other Health 
Services 


CB-XA 


SU 


Passenger Car, Other Automotive 


CB-XA-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-XB 


SU 


Tires, Battery, Accessory, Other 
Automotive 


CB-XB-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-XC 


SU 


Mobile Homes, Boat, Automotive 


CB-XC-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-XD 


SU 


Gasoline Service Stations, Other 
Automotive 


CB-XD-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-XE 


SU 


Automotive Repair, Other Automotive 


CB-XE-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-XF 


SU 


Tire Retreading, Other Automotive 


CB-XF-1 


MU 


Do 



LIST OF QUESTIONNAIRE FORMS 



123 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF BUSINESS 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






Wholesale (SIC Major Group 50) 






Merchant Wholesalers and Merchandise 






Agents and Brokers 


CB-50A 


SU 


Motor Vehicles, Automotive Equipment, 
and Related Trades 


CB-50A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50B 


SU 


Drugs, Chemicals, Paints, and Related 
Trades 


CB-50B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50C 


SU 


Piece Goods, Apparel, and Related Trades 


CB-50C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50D 


SU 


Food, Beverages, Tobacco, and Related 
Trades 


CB-50D-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50E 


SU 


Farm Products, Related Trades 


CB-50E-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50F 


SU 


Electrical, Electronic Goods, and Related 
Trades 


CB-50F-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50G 


SU 


Hardware, Plumbing, Heating, Air Condi- 
tioning, and Related Trades 


CB-50G-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50H 


SU 


Commercial Industrial, Farm Machinery, 
Equipment, and Related Trades 


CB-50H-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-"50J 


SU 


Professional, Service Establishment, Trans- 
portation Equipment, Farm-Garden Ma- 
chinery, Supplies, and Related Trades 


CB-50J-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50K 


SU 


Coal, Metals, Minerals, and Related Trades 


CB-50K-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50L 


SU 


Petroleum Business; Bulk Stations, 
Terminals 


CB-50L-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50M 


SU 


Scrap, Waste Materials, and Related Trades 


CB-50M-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50N 


SU 


Lumber, Construction Materials, and 
Related Trades 


CB-50N-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-50P 


SU 


Wholesalers and Distributors 


CB-50P-1 


MU 


Do 

Manufactures' Sales Branches and 
Sales Offices 


CB-51A-1 


MU 


Food, Tobacco, and Kindred Products 


CB-51B-1 


MU 


Apparel, Textiles, Textile Products 


CB51C-1 


MU 


Lumber, Wood Products, Furniture, and 
Related Products 


CB-51D-1 


MU 


Paper, Publications, and Related Products 


CB-51E-1 


MU 


Chemicals, Petroleum, and Allied Products 


CB-51F-1 


MU 


Rubber, Plastics, Leather, Stone, Glass, and 
Allied Products 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF BUSINESS 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






Wholesale (SIC Major Group 50)-Continue 






Manufactures' Sales Branches and 






Sales Off ices— Continued 


CB-51G-1 


MU 


Fabricated Metals Products 


CB-51H-1 


MU 


Machinery (except Electrical) and Allied 
Products 


CB-51J-1 


MU 


Electrical Machinery, Equipment, and 
Supplies 


CB-51K-1 


MU 


Transportation Equipment 


CB-51L-1 


MU 


Instruments, Photographic Goods, Jewelry, 
Coal, and Miscellaneous Products 

Services (SIC Major Groups 70 to 79, 
Except 702 and 704) 


CB-70 


SU 


Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, Trailer 
Parks, Camps 


CB-70-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-72-A 


SU 


Laundry, Cleaning, and Related Services 


CB-72A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-72B 


SU 


Funeral Services 


CB-72B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-72C 


SU 


Personal Services 


CB-72C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-73A 


SU 


Advertising 


CB-73A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-73B 


SU 


Miscellaneous Business Services 


CB-73B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-73C 


SU 


Commercial Research, Development and 
Testing Laboratories 


CB-73C-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-75A 


SU 


Automobile Parking 


CB-75A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-75B 


SU 


Automobile and Truck Rental and Leasing, 
Without Drivers 


CB-75B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-76 


SU 


Repair Services 


CB-76-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-78A 


SU 


Motion Picture Production, Distribution, 
Service 


CB-78A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-78B 


SU 


Motion Picture Theaters 


CB-78B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-79A 


SU 


Theaters and Other Establishments in 
Which Live Theatrical Shows Are 
Presented; Theatrical Producers; Bands, 
Orchestras, Entertainers; Dance Halls, 
Dance Schools, and Studios 


CB-79A-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-79B 


SU 


Amusement and Recreation Services 


CB-79B-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-80 


SU 


Dental Laboratories 


CB-81 


SU 


Law Firms 


CB-81-1 


MU 


Do 


CB-89 


SU 


Architectural and Engineering Firms 


CB-89-1 


MU 


Do 



124 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF BUSINESS 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






Public Warehousing (SIC 4214 to 4226) 


CB-42A 


SU 


Public Warehousing, Except Furniture 


CB-42A-1 


MU 


Do 
Other Census of Business Forms 


CB-47 




Travel Agencies 


CB-47-1 




Do 


CB-40 




Truck Carriers 


CB-41 




Bus Carrier Survey 


CB-AR(1-14) 




Business Classification Report 
(card form) 


CB-AS (13-16) 




Do 


CBC-1 




Do 


CBC-2 




Do 

CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 
QUESTIONNAIRES 

SIC Major Group 19— Ordnance and 
Accessories 


MC-19A 




Ordnance and Accessories (Except Guided 
Missiles and Fire Control Equipment) 

SIC Major Group 20- Food and Kindred 
Products 


MC-20A 




Slaughtering and Meat Packing Plants 


MC-20B 




Meat Processing Plants 


MC-20C 




Poultry and Small Game Products 


MC-20D 




Dairy Products 


MC-20E 




Fish and Other Seafood 


MC-20F 




Canned Foods 


MC-20G 




Dried Foods, Pickles, Coffee, Ice, and 
Macaroni 


MC-20H 




Frozen Foods 


MC-20I 




Feed, Cereal Preparations, and Blended and 
Prepared Flour 


MC-20J 




Starch, Corn Products, and Rice Milling 


MC-20K 




Bakery Products 


MC-20L 




Sugar 


MC-20M 




Confectionery 


MC-20N 




Malt and Malt Beverages 


MC-20P 




Wines and Liquors 


MC-20Q 




Distilled, Rectified and Blended Liquors 


MC-20R 




Soft Drinks and Flavorings 


MC-20S 




Miscellaneous Food Products 


MC-20T 




Fats and Oils 


MC-20U 




Flour and Other Grain Mill Products 

SIC Major Group 21 -Tobacco 
Manufactures 


MC-21A 




Tobacco Manufactures 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






SIC Major Group 22-Textile Mill Products 


MC-22A 




Weaving Mills (Broadwoven Fabrics) and 
Tire Cord 


MC-22C 




Hosiery 


MC-22D 




Knitting Mill Products (Except Hosiery) 


MC-22E 




Textile Finishing Plants 


MC-22G 




Combing Mill Products, Throwing and 
Spinning of Yarn and Thread 


MC-22H 




Nonwoven Felts, Paddings, Jute Goods, 
and Miscellaneous Textile Products 


MC-221 




Lace Goods, Impregnated and Coated 
Fabrics (Except Rubberized), Cordage 
and Twine 

SIC Major Group 23- Apparel and Related 
Products 


MC-23A 




Apparel 


MC-23B 




Miscellaneous Apparel and Accessories 


MC-23D 




Gloves and Mittens 


MC-23E 




Miscellaneous Fabricated Textile Products 

SIC Major Group 24-Lumber and Wood 
Products, Except Furniture 


MC-24A 




Logs, Lumber, Hardwood Dimension and 
Flooring 


MC-24B 




Miscellaneous Sawmill Products 


MC-24C 




Fabricated Millwork 


MC-24D 




Veneer and Plywood 


MC-24E 




Prefabricated Wood Products 


MC-24F 




Wooden Containers (Except Cooperage) 


MC-24H 




Wood Preserving 


MC-241 




Pa rt i c 1 e boa rd , Hardboard, and 
Miscellaneous Wood Products 

SIC Major Group 25— Furniture and 
Fixtures 


MC-25A 




Wood Household Furniture (Except 
Upholstered) 


MC-25B 




Wood Household Furniture, Upholstered 


MC-25C 




Metal Household Furniture 


MC-25D 




Mattresses and Bedsprings 


MC-25E 




Office, Public Buildings, and Miscellaneous 
Furniture and Fixtures 


MC-25F 




Venetian Blinds and Shades 

SIC Major Group 26-Paper and Allied 
Products 


MC-26A 




Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard 


MC-26B 




Coated Paper, Bags, Sanitary Paper 
Products, and Miscellaneous Converted 
Paper and Board Products 


MC-26C 




Envelopes and Die-Cut Paper and Board 


MC-26D 




Wallpaper and Pressed and Molded Pulp 
Goods 


MC-26E 




Paperboard Containers and Boxes 



LIST OF QUESTIONNAIRE FORMS 



125 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






SIC Major Group 27 — Printing and 






Publishing, and Allied Industries 


MC-27A 




Newspaper Publishing 


MC-27B 




Periodical, Book, and Miscellaneous Pub- 
lishing 


MC-27C 




Book and Commercial Printing, and Mani- 
fold Business Forms 


MC-27D 




Greeting Card Publishing 


MC-27E 




Bookbinding, Blankbooks and Looseleaf 
Binders 

SIC Major Group 28— Chemicals and Allied 
Products 


MC-28A 




Industrial Inorganic and Organic Chemicals 
(Except Industrial Gases) 


MC-28C 




Plastics Materials and Synthetic Rubber 


MC-28D 




Synthetic Organic Fibers 


MC-28E 




Drugs and Medicines 


MC-28F 




Soaps, Polishes, and Related Products 
(Except Toilet Preparations) 


MC-28G 




Toilet Preparations 


MC-28H 




Paints, Putties, and Allied Products 


MC-28J 




Fertilizers 


MC-28M 




Explosives and Carbon Black 

SIC Major Group 29— Petroleum Refining 
and Related Industries 


MC-29A 




Petroleum Products 


MC-29B 




Asphalt and Tar Roofing, Siding and 
Paving Products 

SIC Major Group 30-Rubber and 
Miscellaneous Plastic Products 


MC-30A 




Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastic Products 


MC-30B 




Miscellaneous Plastics Products 

SIC Major Group 31— Leather and Leather 
Products 


MC-31A 




Leather Tanning; Leather Belting and 
Packing, and Footwear Cut Stock 


MC-31C 




Footwear, Except Rubber 


MC-31D 




Luggage, Personal and Other Leather 
Goods, and Leather Novelties 

SIC Major Group 32-Stone, Clay, and 
Glass Products 


MC-32A 




Glass and Glass Products (Except 
Containers) 


MC-32B 




Glass Containers 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); ML) indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






SIC Major Group 32-Stone, Clay, and 






Glass Products— Continued 


MC-32C 




Cement, Lime and Gypsum Products 


MC-32G 




Concrete Products 


MC-32H 




Ready-Mixed Concrete 


MC-321 




Cut Stone and Stone Products 


MC-32K 




Asbestos Products; Gaskets, and Packing; 
Hard Surface Floor Coverings 

SIC Major Group 33-Primary Metal 
Industries 


MC-33A 




Coke Oven, Blast Furnace, Steel Mill and 
Electrometallurgical Products 


MC-33B 




Foundry Products 


MC-33C 




Primary Smelting and Refining of 
Nonferrous Metals 


MC-33D 




Secondary Smelting and Refining of 
Nonferrous Metals 


MC-33E 




Rolling, Drawing, and Extruding of 
Nonferrous Metals 


MC-33F 




Nonferrous Wire Drawing and Insulating 


MC-33G 




Metal Forgings 

SIC Major Group 34-Fabricated Metal 
Products 


MC-34A 




Metal Cans and Shipping Containers 


MC-34B 




Cutlery, Hand Tools, Files, and Saws 


MC-34C 




Hardware 


MC-34D 




Valves and Fittings, Metal Plumbing 
Fixtures and Fittings 


MC-34E 




Heating Equipment (Except Electric); 
Exhaust and Ventilating Fans 


MC-34F 




Fabricated Structural Metal Products 


MC-34G 




Screw Machine Products; Bolts, Nuts, 
Screws, Washers; and Rivets 


MC-34H 




Metal Stampings 


MC-341 




Fabricated Wire Products 


MC-34J 




Safes and Vaults; Steel Springs 


MC-34K 




Collapsible Tubes and Metal Foil 


MC-34L 




Fabricated Pipe and Fittings and Miscellane- 
ous Fabricated Metal Products 

SIC Major Group 35-Machinery, Except 
Electric 


MC-35A 




Steam Engines and Turbines; Internal 
Combustion Engines; Generator Set 
Units 


MC-35B 




Farm Machinery and Equipment 


MC-35C 




Construction and Mining Machinery and 
Equipment; Hoists, Cranes, and 
Monorails 


MC-35D 




Oil and Gas Field Machinery and 
Equipment 



126 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






SIC Major Group 35— Machinery, Except 






Electric— Continued 


MC-35E 




Conveying and Elevating Equipment, 
Industrial Trucks, Tractors, Trailers, and 
Stackers 


MC-35F 




Metalworking Machinery and Equipment 


MC-35G 




Food Products Machinery and Equipment 


MC-34H 




Textile Machinery 


MC-35I 




Woodworking Machinery and Equipment 


MC-35J 




Pulp- and Paper-Industries Machinery 


MC-35K 




Printing Trades Machinery and Equipment 


MC-35L 




Special Industries Machinery and General 
Industry Machinery, n.e.c. 


MC-35M 




Pumps and Compressors; Measuring and 
Dispensing Pumps 


MC-35N 




Mechanical Power Transmission 
Equipment; Ball and Roller Bearings 


MC-35P 




Industrial Patterns and Molds; 
Miscellaneous Machinery; Machine Job 
Shopwork 


MC-35Q 




Industrial Furnaces and Ovens 


MC-35R 




Office, Computing and Accounting 
Machines 


MC-35S 




Service-Industry and Household Machines 


MC-35T 




Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 
Equipment 

SIC Major Group 36— Electrical 
Machinery 


MC-36A 




Power, Distribution, and Specialty 
Transformers 


MC-36B 




Switchgear and Switchboard Apparatus, 
and Industrial Controls 


MC-36C 




Motors, Generators, and Motor-Generator 
Sets 


MC-36D 




Welding Apparatus 


MC-36E 




Carbon and Graphite Products; 
Miscellaneous Electrical Equipment 


MC-36F 




Electrical Household Appliances (Except 
Refrigerators and Freezers) 


MC-36G 




Electric Lamps 


MC-36H 




Lighting Fixtures 


MC-36I 




Wiring Devices 


MC-36J 




Home Radio and Television Sets, and 
Phonographs 


MC-36L 




Telephone and Telegraph Apparatus 


MC-36M 




Radio and Television Communication 
Equipment and Electronic Components 
and Accessories 


MC-36N 




Storage Batteries; Primary Batteries 


MC-36Q 




Electrical Equipment for Internal 
Combustion Engines 


MC-36R 




Miscellaneous Electric Products 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 






QUESTIONNAIRES-Continued 






SIC Major Group 37— Transportation 






Equipment 


MC-37A 




Motor Vehicles, Bodies and Parts, and 
Accessories 


MC-37B 




Complete Aircraft and Missiles 


MC-37C 




Aircraft Propellers; Aircraft and Missile 
Parts 


MC-37D 




Ship and Boat Building and Repairing 


MC-37E 




Rail Transportation Equipment, Including 
Trackless Trolley Buses 


MC-37F 




Motorcycles, Bicycles, and Miscellaneous 
Transportation Equipment 


MC-37G 




Trailer Coaches (House Trailers) 

CONSUMPTION OF MATERIALS, PARTS, 
CONTAINERS, AND SUPPLIES (SPECIAL 
QUESTIONNAIRES) 

Mineral Industries 


MA-131.1011 




Iron Ores 


MA-131.1021 




Copper Ores 


MA-131.1211 




Coal 


MA-131.1300 




Oil and Gas Field Operations 


MA-131.1321 




Natural Gas Liquids 


MA-131.1400 




Stone, Sand, and Gravel 


MA-131.1470 




Chemical and Fertilizer Minerals 
Manufacturing Industries 


MA-131.1900 




Guns, Howitzers, Mortars, and Other Ord- 
nance and Accessories, n.e.c. 


MA-131.1925 




Guided Missiles and Space Vehicles, Com- 
pletely Assembled 


MA-131.1929 




Ammunition, Except for Small Arms, n.e.c. 


MA-131.1931 




Tanks and Tank Components 


MA-131.1941 




Sighting and Fire Control Equipment 


MA-131.1951 




Small Arms 


MA-131.1961 




Small Arms Ammunition 


MA-131.2810 




Industrial Organic and Inorganic Chemicals 


MA-131.2820 




Synthetic Organic Fibers 


MA-131.2821 




Plastics Materials and Resins 


MA-131.2830 




Medicinal Chemicals, Pharmaceutical Prep- 
arations 


MA-131.2840 




Soaps, Detergents, and Specialty Cleaners 


MA-131.2844 




Toiler Preparations 


MA-131.2879 




Agricultural Chemicals, Pesticides 


MA-131.2890 




Miscellaneous Chemicals, n.e.c. 


MA-131.2893 




Printing Ink 


MA-131.3429 




Hardware, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3433 




Nonelectric Heating Equipment 


MA-131.3443 




Boiler Shop Products 


MA-131.3444 




Sheet Metalwork 


MA-131.3461 




Metal Stampings 


MA- 13 1.3494 




Valves and Fittings 



LIST OF QUESTIONNAIRE FORMS 



127 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CONSUMPTION OF MATERIALS, 






PARTS, CONTAINERS, AND SUPPLIES 






(SPECIAL QUESTIONNAIRES)-Con. 






Manufacturing Industries— Con. 


MA-131.3511 




Steam Engines and Turbines 


MA- 13 1.35 19 




Internal Combustion Engines 


MA-131.3522 




Farm Machinery and Equipment 


MA-131.3531 




Construction Machinery 


MA-131.3532 




Mining Machinery and Equipment 


MA-131.3533 




Oilfield Machinery 


MA-131.3535 




Conveyors 


MA-131.3537 




Industrial Trucks and Tractors 


MA-131.3541 




Metal-Cutting Machine Tools 


MA-131.3542 




Metal-Forming Machine Tools 


MA-131.3545 




Machine Tool Accessories 


MA-131.3548 




Metalworking Machinery, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3551 




Food Products Machinery 


MA-131.3552 




Textile Machinery 


MA-131.3554 




Paper Industries Machinery 


MA-131.3555 




Printing Trades Machinery 


MA-131.3559 




Special Industry Machinery, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3561 




Pumps and Compressors 


MA-131.3562 




Ball and Roller Bearings 


MA-131.3566 




Power Transmission Equipment 


MA-131.3567 




Industrial Process Furnaces and Ovens 


MA-131.3569 




General Industrial Machinery, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3570 




Computing and Related Machines 


MA-131.3579 




Office Machines, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3581 




Automatic Vending Machines 


MA-131.3585 




Refrigeration Machinery 


MA-131.3589 




Service Industry Machines, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3599 




Miscellaneous Machinery, Except Electrical 


MA-131.3611 




Electrical Measuring Instruments 


MA-131.3612 




Transformers 


MA-131.3613 




Switchgear and Switchboards 


MA-131.3621 




Motors and Generators 


MA-131.3622 




Industrial Controls 


MA-131.3624 




Carbon and Graphite Products 


MA-131.3629 




Electrical Industrial Goods, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3631 




Household Cooking Equipment 


MA-131.3632 




Household Refrigerators 


MA-131.3633 




Household Laundry Equipment 


MA-131.3634 




Electrical Housewares and Fans 


MA-131.3639 




Household Appliances, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3641 




Electric Lamps 


MA-131.3642 




Lighting Fixtures 


MA-131.3643 




Current Carrying Devices 


MA- 13 1.3644 




Noncurrent Carrying Devices 


MA-131.3651 




Radios and TV Receiving Sets 


MA-131.3661 




Telephone, Telegraph Apparatus 


MA-131.3662 




Radio, TV Communication Equipment 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CONSUMPTION OF MATERIALS, 






PARTS, CONTAINERS, AND SUPPLIES 






(SPECIAL QUESTIONNAIRES)-Con. 






Manufacturing Industries— Con. 


MA-131.3670 




Electronic Components, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3691 




Storage Batteries 


MA-131.3694 




Engine Electrical Equipment 


MA-131.3699 




Electrical Products, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3710 




Motor Vehicles and Passenger Car Bodies 


MA-131.3713 




Truck and Bus Bodies 


MA-131.3714 




Motor Vehicles, Parts and Accessories 


MA-131.3715 




Truck Trailers 


MA-131.3721 




Aircraft 


MA-131.3722 




Aircraft Engines and Parts 


MA-131.3729 




Aircraft Equipment, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3741 




Locomotives and Parts 


MA-131.3742 




Railroad and Street Cars 


MA-131.3791 




Trailer Coaches 


MA-131.3811 




Scientific Instruments 


MA-131.3821 




Mechanical Measuring Devices 


MA-131.3822 




Automatic Temperature Controls 


MA-131.3842 




Surgical Appliances 


MA-131.3851 




Ophthalmic Goods 


MA-131.3861 




Photographic Equipment 


MA-131.3871 




Watches and Clocks 


MA-131.3911 




Jewelry, Precious Metal 


MA-131.3931 




Musical Instruments 


MA-131.3941 




Games and Toys, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3949 




Sporting and Athletic Goods, n.e.c. 


MA-131.3964 




Needles, Pins, and Fasteners 


MA-131.3991 




Brooms and Brushes 


MA-131.3993 




Signs and Advertising Displays 


MA-131.3994 




Morticians' Goods 

CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION 
INDUSTRIES QUESTIONNAIRES 


CBC-1T 




Advance Report— Census of Construction 
Industries 


CBC-2T 




Do 


CC-1 




1967 Census of Construction Industries 

QUESTIONNAIRES FOR CENSUSES IN 
OUTLYING AREAS 

Economic Census of Puerto Rico 


EC-PR-10 




Wholesale Trade (Multiunits) 


EC-PR-11 




Wholesale Trade (Single Units) 


EC-PR-H(Sp) 




Comercio Por Mayor 


EC-PR-20 




Retail Trade (Multiunits) 


EC-PR-20(Sp) 




Comercio Por Menor 


EC-PR-21 




Retail Trade (Single Units) 


EC-PR-21(Sp) 




Comercio Por Menor 


EC-PR-22 




Retail Trade (Field Enumeration) 



128 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






QUESTIONNAIRES FOR CENSUSES IN 






OUTLYING AREAS-Continued 






Economic Census of Puerto Rico— Con. 


EC-PR-30 


MU 


Selected Services 


EC-PR-31 


SU 


Selected Services 


EC-PR-31(Sp) 




Servicios Seleccionados 


EC-PR-32 




Selected Services (Field Enumeration) 


EC-PR-32(Sp) 




Servicios Seleccionados 


EC-PR-50 




Manufactures (Long Form) 


EC-PR-50(Sp) 




Manufactura 


EC-PR-60 




Manufactures (Short Form) 


EC-PR-60(Sp) 




Manufactura 


EC-PR-99 




Construction Industry 


EC-PR-99(Sp) 




Industria de la Construccion 
Economic Census of Guam 


NC-X3G 




Guam— General Schedule 
Economic Census of Virgin Islands 


NC-X3V 




Virgin Islands— General Schedule 


NC-X3V(Sp) 




Islas Virgenes Cuestionario General 



1 SU indicates form sent to single-unit companies (companies with one 
establishment); MU indicates forms sent to multiunit companies (com- 
panies with two or more establishments). 



Form 






number 


Type 1 


Title 






CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 






QUESTIONNAIRES 






National Travel Survey 


TC-100 




National Travel Survey 

Truck Inventory and Use Survey 


TC-200B 




Truck Inventory and Use Survey 
Commodity Transportation Survey 


TC-400 




Interview Record 


TC-400A 




Plant Control List 


TC-400B 




Plant Transfer Record 


TC-401 




Transcription Record for Shipments From 
Plants 


TC-403 




Instructions for Selecting Shipping 
Documents 


TC-410 




Periodic Progress Report 


TC-410A 




Summary of Progress Reports from 
Regional Offices 


TC-420 




Commodity Transportation Survey 

CENSUS OF COMMERCIAL 
FISHERIES QUESTIONNAIRE 


FC-09A 




1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries 



Appendix G 



FASCIMILES OF SELECTED QUESTIONNAIRES 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



Page 



NC-K1. Company Summary Report 131 

NC-X1 A. 1967 Report of Company Organization (for known multiunit firms) 133 

NC-X1B. 1967 Report of Company Organization (for potential multiunit firms) 134 

NC-X1C. (Form letter for special out-of-scope survey) 135 

NC-X2. Listing of Additional Establishments Engaged in Census-Covered Activities 137 

NC-X3. General Schedule 138 

NC-X6. Central Administrative Office or Auxiliary Establishment 141 

NC-K13. Company Exploration Expenditures and Assets for Oil and Gas Field Operations 143 

CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

CB-AS-1. Business Classification Report 145 

CB-40. Truck Carriers 146 

CB-41. Bus Carrier Survey 149 

CB-42A. Public Warehousing 152 

CB-47. Travel Agencies 155 

CB-50L. Petroleum Business, Bulk Stations, Terminals 157 

CB-51A-1. Food, Tobacco, and Kindred Products 160 

CB-54B. Bakeries 164 

CB-59F. Cooperatives 167 

CB-70. Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, Trailer Parks, Camps 170 

CB-80. Dental Laboratories 173 

CB-81 . Law Firms 175 

CB-89. Architectural and Engineering Firms 177 

CB-XD. Gasoline Service Stations, Other Automotive 180 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 

CBC-1T. Advance Report— Census of Business— Construction Industry (for all firms with 100 or more employees and 

some firms with 4-99 employees) 183 

CBC-2T. Advance Report— Census of Business— Construction Industry (for all firms with 1-3 employees and some 

firms with 4-99 employees) 187 

CC-1. 1967 Census of Business— Construction Industry igi 

CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 

MC-20B. Meat Processing Plants 195 

MC-20C. Poultry and Small Game Products 201 

MA-100. Annual Survey of Manufactures 206 

MA-101. Expenditures for Plant and Equipment for Manufacturing Establishments Under Construction 208 

MA-131.1900. Guns, Howitzers, Mortars, and Other Ordnances and Accessories, n.e.c 209 

NC-K4M. Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer (for multiunit firms) 211 

NC-K4S. Distribution of Sales by Class of Customer (for single-unit firms) 212 

129 



130 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Page 



CM-1. Mining Classification Report 214 

MC-10A. Iron and Manganese Ores 215 

MC-10K. Mineral Contract Services 221 

MC-13A. Oil and Gas Field Operations 225 

MC-13B. Natural Gas Liquids 231 

MA-131.1011. Iron Ores 233 



CENSUS OF TRANSPORTATION 



TC-100. 


National 


TC-200B. 


Truck ln\ 


TC-400. 


Commod 


TC-400A. 


Commod 


TC-400B. 


Commod 


TC-401. 


Commod 


TC-403. 


Commod 


TC-410. 


Commod 


TC-410A. 


Commod 


TC-420. 


Commod 



National Travel Survey 235 

Truck Inventory and Use Survey 237 

ty Transportation Survey— Interview Record 239 

ty Transportation Survey— Plant Control List 241 

ty Transportation Survey— Plant Transfer Record 242 

ty Transportation Survey— Transcription Record for Shipments From Plants 243 

ty Transportation Survey— Instructions for Selecting Shipping Documents 244 

ty Transportation Survey— Periodic Progress Report 246 

ty Transportation Survey— Summary of Progress Reports from Regional Offices 247 

ty Transportation Survey 248 



CENSUS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 

FC-09A. 1967 Census of Commercial Fisheries 



249 



ECONOMIC CENSUSES OF PUERTO RICO 

EC-PR-1 1 . Wholesale Trade 251 

EC-PR-1 1 (Sp). Comercio Por Mayor 254 

EC-PR-20. Retail Trade 257 

EC-PR-20(Sp). Comercio Por Menor 260 

EC-PR-31 . Selected Services 264 

EC-PR-31(Sp). Servicios Seleccionados 267 

EC-PR-50. Manufactures (for firms with 10 employees or more) 270 

EC-PR-50(Sp). Manufactura 274 

EC-PR-60. Manufactures (for firms with fewer than 10 employees) 279 

EC-PR-60(Sp). Manufactura 282 

EC-PR-99. Construction Industry 285 

EC-PR-99(Sp). Industria de la Construccion 289 

ECONOMIC CENSUSES OF GUAM AND VIRGIN ISLANDS 

NC-X3G. Guam— General Schedule 293 

NC-X3V. Virgin Islands— General Schedule 296 

NC-X3V(Sp). Islas Virgenes-Cuestionario General 298 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



131 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE-APRIL 30, 1968 



Form approved; Budget Bureau No. 41-S6710O 



NC-K1 



(9991) 



1967 CENSUSES OF 

BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, 

AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

COMPANY SUMMARY REPORT 



r7> 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



Please read instructions before completing report 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same law. 
your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census employee* 
and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies retained in 
your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this 
report please refer to 



CENSUS FILE NO. 



Name and address (Please correct any errors) 



INSTRUCTIONS 



This form will provide you and the Bureau of the Census with a systematic means for 
assuring that ALL DOMESTIC ACTIVITIES of your company and its subsidiaries have 
been accounted for in the 1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Indus- 
tries. For the purposes of this report, "domestic" activities should include all 50 States 
and the District of Columbia. It should not include activities of your firm in foreign 
countries. (Note — Your Puerto Rico activities, if any, will be covered separately in the 
1967 Census of Puerto Rico conducted jointly by the Commonwealth government and the 
U.S. Bureau of the Census.) 



Please complete Form NC-K1, "Company Summary Report," after you have prepared all 
required 1967 Census establishment reports for your company and its subsidiaries, but 
before you return these completed reports to the Bureau of the Census. Preparing this 
Company Summary Report prior to returning the completed establishment reports may help 
you to discover more readily and to correct promptly any omission or duplication of reports 
for those establishments which should be covered in the 1967 Censuses of Business, Manu- 
factures and Mineral Industries. In turn, this will speed up the Census Bureau's processing 
of your company report forms and will minimize any correspondence regarding coverage. 



ITEM 1. GENERAL INFORMATION 



A. NAME OF COMPANY 



COMPANY ORGANIZATION 
Is the above-named company owned or controlled by * es 

another company? {_ 

(If "Yes," please give name and address of owning or 
controlling company.) 



No 

□ 



C. LEGAL FORM OF OWNERSHIP OF COMPANY - Mark one 



1 [ | Individual proprietor 

2 Q Partnership 

| | Corporation (Do not 
mark if any form of 
cooperative association.) 



8 | ] Co-op (Cooperative association), 

corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



ITEM 2. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY OF YOUR COMPANY AND ITS SUBSIDIARIES DURING 1967 - Column (a) lists the Employer Identification '(E.I.) 
Numbers assigned to your company, based on information you reported on the 1967 Census Form NC-X1, "Report of Company Organization." If your 
company was assigned any other E.I. Numbers during any part of 1967, please add these numbers to the list. Then, complete ALL columns for EACH 
E.I. Number listed. (USE ITEM 2 Continuation Sheet if necessary.) 



NOTE: All employment figures (Columns b through f) are for the pay period including MARCH 12, 1967 



Employer 
Identification 

Numbers 

used by 

your company 

during 1967 



(°) 



1-1 



Number of 
employees 

(as of 

March 12, 1967) 

reported on 

Treasury 

Payroll Tax 

Forms 941, 

943, or CT-1 



(b? | 1-2 



Employees in domestic establishments, 
as REPORTED on your 1967 Censuses 
of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral 
Industries forms: 



Census Form 

MA- or MC- 

Serles 

Production 
workers plus 

all others 

(Manufactures 

and Mineral 

Industries) 



Census Form. 

C^- or CC- 

Serles 

(Wholesale, 

Retail, 
Service, and 
Construction) 



(d) 



Census Form 
NC-X6 

(Central 

adminstrative 

offices and 

auxiliaries) 



(e) 



Employees and payroll of domestic business activities, NOT REPORTED 
on your 1967 Censuses of Business, Manufactures, and Mineral Industries 
forms (i.e., agriculture; railroads; pipelines; radio and TV stations; insur- 
ance agencies; banks; etc.): 



Employees 

in domestic 

activities 

NOT 

REPORTED 

on your Census 

forms 



Description of these activities 

NOT REPORTED on 

your Census forms 



(9) 



Total payroll 

for the year 1967 

for these activities 

NOT REPORTED 

on your Census forms 

THOUSANDS ot 
dollars ($000) 



(h> 



1-4 



For 

Census 

Use 

Only 



Key 



1-5' 




10 



Subtotal from 

Item 2 Continuation 

Sheet, if any 



TOTAL, 
All Employer 
Identification 
Numbers 



NUMBER OF ITEM 2 CONTINUATION 
SHEETS ATTACHED TO THIS FORM - 



ITEM 3. COVERAGE CHECK OF COMPANY EMPLOYMENT TOTALS 



A. Comparison of COMPANY employment with ESTABLISHMENT 
employment for the pay period Including March 12, 1967 

Enter employment totals from Item 2, Line 10: 

(1) From Column (c), total 



(2) From Column (d), total 



(3) From Column (e), total 



(4) From Column (0, total 



(5) Sum of figures above- 



Number of employees 

reported in Item 2, 

line 10, above 



Key 



If the two figures in Lines (5) and (6) of Item 3A differ by more than 5 percent, 
please verify the reported figures in Item 2. (For each Employer Identification 
Number, compare the Column (b) figure with the sum of Columns (c), (d), (e), and 
(f). These totals should ordinarily be equal for each E.I. Number, if all employ- 
ment has been accounted for.) 

If, after such verification, a company-wide difference in excess of 5 percent still 
exists, please explain: 



(6) Sum of company employment reported 
on Treasury Payroll Tax Forms 
(From Column (D) in Line 10) 



2-6 



For Census 
Use Only 



2-9* 



'lease continue 



132 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM NC-K1 -Con. 



FORM NC-K1 



Page 2 



ITEMS 4-10. SELECTED COMPANY STATISTICS FOR 1967 

Please report the following items on a Consolidated basis for the DOMESTIC ACTIVITIES of your company and ALL its subsidiaries as defined in Item 2 of this report. 
Do not include foreign activities, if any, (except for reporting foreign assets in Item 10). Consolidate all domestic activities, whether ornot coveredin the 1967 Census 
by individual report forms. If calendar year records are not available, fiscal year reports for the periods ending between October 31, 1967 and February 29, 1968 are 
acceptable. If book records are not available, enter your best estimates. Before Completing these items, please read the detailed instructions. 



ITEM 4. COMPANY PAYROLL DURING 1967 

Report total wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other remuneration 

Eaid by your company and its subsidiaries at domestic establishments and 
acilities during 1967, before payroll deductions. 



Total company payroll during 1967 



Thousands of dolla 
(S000) 



ITEM 5. COMPANY SALES AND RECEIPTS DURING 1967 

Report consolidated net sales and business receipts of your company and 
its subsidiaries during 1967. 

Exclude domestic intra-company transfers; exclude sales BY foreign subsid- 
diaries; exclude non-operating income. Include sales to customers OUTSIDE 
your company; include excise taxes and sales taxes paid by your company 
directly to Federal, Slate, or local taxing agencies; include export transfers 
TO your foreign subsidiaries. 



Q. Net company sales and business receipts during 1967 



b. Does the entry in 5a above INCLUDE excise and sales taxes e ^ 
paid directly to taxing agencies? 1 1 1 



□ 2 



c. If "No," report here the amount of such taxes paid by your 
company and its subsidiaries during 1967 



ITEM 6. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES DURING 1967 (EXCLUDE LAND AND 
MINERAL RIGHTS) 

Report all capital expenditures actually made during 1967 by your company 
and its subsidiaries for all domestic establishments and facilities. "Capital 
expenditures" refer to all costs that are chargeable to fixed assets accounts 
of your company for which depreciation or amortization accounts are ordin- 
arily maintained; include major alterations, capitalized repairs and improve- 
ments; include expenditures made in 1967 for establishments under construc- 
tion but not yet in operation. 

Exclude capital expenditures made by owners of property rented or leased 
Dyvour firm and its subsidiaries; but include expenditures made by your firm 
and its subsidiaries for structures which, on completion, were cr are to be 
sold and leased back by your firm. Exclude cost of land, mineral rights, and 
cost of maintenance and repair charged as current and operating expenses; 
exclude capital expenditures by subsidiaries in foreign countries. 



Type of capital expenditures: 

a. New structure and additions to plant 



b. New machinery and new equipment 



c. Used plant, machinery, and equipment acquired from others 



d. Capitalized development and exploration of mineral properties 



e. TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES DURING 1967 
(Sum of Lines a, b, c, and d) 



ITEM 7. CHANGES IN FIXED ASSETS DURING 1967 

Report the value of fixed assets of your company and its subsidiaries for 

which depreciation and amortization accounts are ordinarily maintained, 

"Gross (book) value" represents the acquisition cost (original cost or other 

basis) to your company of such fixed assets. "Net value" represents the 

gross value of such fixed assets, less their accumulated depreciation and 

amortization. 

Include fixed assets for all domesLic establishments and facilities. 

Exclude fixed assets of your company and -its subsidiaries in foreign 
countries. These assets should be reported in Item 10c below. 

Include all depreciable assets (buildings, structures, equipment, etc.) 
and amortizablc fixed assets. 

Exc lude dcpletable assets (land, timber, and mineral rights) and non-fixed 
assets (inventories, cash, accounts receivable, etc.). These assets should 
be reported in Item 10b below. 

Include in the value of assets all improvements and new construction that 
were "in-pro^rcss" but not yet completed at the end of 1967. Also include 
the value of fixed assets (machinery, equipment, buildings, structures, etc.) 
owned by your company and its subsidiaries but leased or rented to other 
companies. 



a. Gross (book) value of fixed assets owned bv vour company, 
as of BEGINNING of 1967 



b. Net value of fixed assets, as of BEGINNING of 1967 (i.e., 
gross value, less accumulated depreciation and amortization) 



c. Total capital expenditures DURING 1967 
(copy figure from Item 6e) 



d. Other acquisitions by your company (by merger, exchange of stock, 
etc.) of fixed assets DURING 1967 (if not included in Line c above) 



e. Depreciation and amortization charges against fixed assets 
DURING 1967 (including charges against those acquired or 
completed during the year) 



f. Other deductions from fixed assets DURING 1967 (i.e., net value of 
assets sold, retired, scrapped, or destroyed; and other adjustments'! 



g. Net value of fixed assets, as of END of 196.. 

(Should equal Lines b + c + d-e-f. If not, please 
comment in "Remarks.") 



ITEM 8. RENTAL PAYMENTS MADE DURING 1967 (EXCLUDE LAND) 

Report all rental payments made or accrued during 1967 to other firms which u wn 
the plant and equipment rented or leased by your company and its subsidiaries. 
In reporting rents paid (or equivalent charges) for use of "Buildings and 
structures," exclude separately identified fees for leasing of land (such as 
ground rents). 

Under "Machinery and equipment," be sure to include rental payments (or 
equivalent charges) for use of production machinery, office equipment, com- 
puter systems, passenger cars, trucks, materials handling equipment, and 
all other types of machinery or equipment. 



Rental payments made by your company: 

a. For use of BUILDING AND STRUCTURES (excluding land) 



b. For use of MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 



c. TOTAL RENTAL PAYMENTS DURING 1967 
(Sum of Lines a ond b) 



ITEM 9. INVENTORIES, AS OF BEGINNING AND END OF 1967 

Report all inventories of your company and its subsidiaries at the beginning 
and end of 1967 on a comparable basis. 

Inventories should include: finished products; work-in-process; and mater- 
ials, supplies, fuels, etc. Exclude inventories of subsidiaries in foreign 
countries. 

In aggregatinz the inventories of your company and its subsidiaries, 
report value on a current cost basis, if feasible, otherwise at book value. 



Value of inventories: 

a. All inventories, as of BEGINNING of 1967 



b. All inventories, as of END of 1967 



ITEM 10. TOTAL COMPANY ASSETS, AS OF END OF 1967 

Report the balance sheet assets of your company and its subsidiaries on a 
consolidated basis. 



Type of company assets: 

a. Net value of fixed assets 
(From Item 7, line g) 



Lines a and b should include only domestic assets of; 
subsidiaries. 



company and its 



Line c should include all assets of. your company and its subsidiaries in 
foreign countries, regardless of type. 



b. All other domestic assets (i.e., inventories, cash, 
accounts receivable, land, etc.) 



c. All foreign assets (i.e., assets located in foreign countries) 



d. TOTAL COMPANY ASSETS, AS OF END OF 1967 
(Sum of Lines a, b, and c) - 



REMARKS 



ITEM 11. 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number and street, city, State) 



Tftlpphoiif 



Art*a iode Nuni.bc 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from. 



Signature of authorized person 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



133 



FORM NC-X1A 

(For known multiunit firms) 



DUE DATE: WITHIN 20 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT 



Budge 



i No. 4I-6614I; Approval Expires December 31, 1967 



pors.NC-X1A 



l.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1967 REPORT OF COMPANY ORGANIZATION 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law {Title 13 U.S. Code). 
By the same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may 
be seen only by sworn Census employees and may be used only for statisti- 
cal purposes. The law also provides thai copies retained in your files are 



Tespondence perloining 
s report please refer to — 



Complete this report within 20 days of receipt 



Item 1 - Name and addr. 



: correct any errors) 



„„j .„.,.„ _„ V S V Bureau of the Census 
and RETURN TO ~> , u II l J- - ,171-Jn 
y^ Jeffersonville, Indiana 4/IJU 



Please Read Instructions Before Completing Report 



Item 2A - COMPANY OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL 

Is the firm named in Item 1 owned or controlled by another domestic company? 

□ YES □ MO 

If "YES, 1 * give name and address of owning or controlling company: 



PLEASE RETURN THIS COPY 



Item 2B — Does the firm named in Item 1 own or control any subsidiaries? 

^\ YES — If "YES," be sure to include the required information 
in this report for ALL subsidiaries. 
U2 NO - If "NO," report only for firm named in Item 1. 



Item 3A - COMPANY ORGANIZATION - Listed in column (a) are the Employer Identification Numbers assigned to the firm named in Item 1 and to the sub- 
sidiaries it owns or controls, based on our records. Please BRING THIS LIST UP TO DATE by additions, corrections, and deletions. In column (b), enter 
name and address of main office or principal place of business for each Employer Identification Number. Be sure to include ALL E.I. numbers assigned, 
both active and inactive. IF MORE SPACE IS NEEDED FOR ADDITIONAL E.I. NUMBERS, USE ITEM 3B ON REVERSE SIDE. 



Employer Identification Numbe 
(a) 



Na 



jnd addres 
fFor E.l. 



> of main office or principal place of bus 
numbers you DELETE, please explain) 



Item 4A - LISTING OF YOUR DOMESTIC ESTABLISHMENTS (based on our records) - Please bring this list up to date by deleting establishments not oper- 
ated by this firm or its subsidiaries in 1967; correcting establishment names, addresses (should be PHYSICAL LOCATIONS), and E.I. numbers, as neces- 
sarv; and listing in Item 4B on the REVERSE SIDE all additional establishments now in operation or expected to be in operation at any time during 1967 



ablishment NAME, ADDRESS of physicol lo 

and Employer Identification Number (E.l.) 

(a) 



(En I 



CORRECTIONS AND RFMARKS 
• ZIP code of physical location, if k 



") 



Census 
file nur 



ablishmer 
and code 




Item 3B - COMPANY ORGANIZATION - Your listing of ALL additional Employer Identification Numbers not listed in Item 3A and currently assigned to your 
firm and its subsidiaries (both active and inactive). If additional spaces are needed, please use a sheet of paper labeled "Item 3, Continuation Sheet," 
identify with your name, address, and Census File Number, and attach to this report. 



Employe 



Identifk 
UL 



i Numbe 



Na 



nd addr, 



of r 



ain office 

iSL 



■r pn 



:i P al pla 



ITEM 4B - YOUR LISTING OF ADDITJONAL DOMESTIC ESTABLISHMENTS - List below ALL domestic establishments of your firm and its subsidiaries 
not listed in Item 4A. Include those acquired by you through purchase, lease, construction, or other methods of acquisition: include those now in operation 
or expected to be in operation at any time during 1967. (For manufacturing and minerals additions, report former owner or operator, if any.) Each additional 
establishment should be listed on a SEPARATE LINE. (For exceptions, PLEASE READ /NSTRUCTIONS.) 



ablishment NAME, (your store or plant numbt 
ADDRESS of physical location, and 
Employer Identification Number (E.l.) 



if any) 



(Enter ZIP i 



ade of physical location, if known) 
(a) 



Kind of business activity 



Major activity 
of establishment 



Mark (X) , 
(b) 



List in order of importance the principal 
products made, lines of merchandise 
sold, types of services rendered, or 
construction activity performed. 



Approxim 
number i 
employe. 

Mark (X) , 

(d) 



FOR 

CENSUS 

USE 



Enter Employer Identification 
Number (9 digits) ►- 



Z2 Manufacturing 

1 Construction 
I I Minerals extraction 

□ Retail trade 

I | Wholesale trade 
I Manufacturers sales 
branch or office 
[ | Administrative office 

□ Other - Specify — >- 



2 □ Under 10 
:>□ 10-19 
a □ 20-49 
J □ 50-99 



<□ 



100 or 



□ Manufacturing 
I ! Construction 
" Wholesale trad 
ufaclurers, 



2 □ Under 10 




134 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM NC-X1B 

(For potential multiunit firms) 

DUE DATE: 20 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT 



FORM NC-X1B 

(7-13-66) 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

1967 REPORT OF COMPANY 
ORGANIZATION 



Complete this report within 20 days of 
receipt and return to: 

Bureau of the Census 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



Item 1 — Is this name and address of 

your firm CORRECT? ► 



□ Yes □ No 

If ' No, ' please correct any errors. 



Budget Bureau No. 41-66141; Approval Expires December 31, 1967 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By 
the same law your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only 
by sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The 
law also provides that copies retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



PLEASE RETURN THIS COPY 



Item 2 - Is the Employer Identification Number printed above the SAME as that 
appearing on your latest Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Form 941? 



□ Yes 



□1 No — If "No," please enter the currently assigned 
Employer Identification Number here. 



E. I. Number 



Item 3 — Does this firm (designated by the currently 
assigned E.I. Number shown above) operate 
at MORE THAN ONE business location? 

□ Yes - If "Yes," complete Items 4A and 4B 

□ No -If "No,"skip to Item 5 



Item 4A — How many establishments 
are operated by this firm? 



Number 



Item 4B - Please LIST each of these establishments on 
the REVERSE SIDE of this report in Item 4B. 



Item 5 — Does this firm own or control any companies using any OTHER Employer Identification Numbers? 
| | Yes - If "Yes," please list below □ No 



Employer Identification Number 



Name and address of main office or principal place of business 



Item 6 - Is this firm owned or controlled by ANOTHER company? 
□ Yes - If "Yes," please identify below □ No 



Employer Identification No. (if known) Name and address of controlling company 



Item 7 - CERTIFICATION - Please COMPLETE the report, including REVERSE SIDE (if applicable), before signing. 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone 



Area code Number Ext 



This report is substantially accurate and has been prepared in accordance with instructions. 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Date 



If Item 3 is "Yes," be sure to complete REVERSE SIDE of this report- 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



135 



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136 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



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GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



137 



Form Approved; Budget Bureau No. 41-S67112 



FORM NC-X2 



1967 CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, 
AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

LISTING OF ADDITIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS 
ENGAGED IN CENSUS-COVERED ACTIVITIES 



Jeffersonville Census Operations Office 



| RETURN TO > j e ff ersonvi ||e, Indiana 47130 



NOTE: Additional copies of this form are available upon request. If 
you prefer, list additional establishments on your own paper. 
BE SURE TO ENTER THE CENSUS FILE NUMBER in the 
upper right-hand corner of each additional sheet. 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). 
By the same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may 
be seen only by sworn Census employees and maybe used only for statistical 
purposes. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report 
please refer to this Census File Numbei 



NC-X2 



> 



LISTING OF ADDITIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS ENGAGED IN CENSUS-COVERED ACTIVITIES 

List below ALL domestic establishments of your firm and its subsidiaries for which you did NOT receive a 1967 Census of Business, Manufactures, or 
Mineral Industries report form. Include those establishments acquired by you through purchase, lease, construction, or other method of acquisition; include 
those that were in operation at any time during 1967. (For manufacturing and minerals establishments listed, report the former owner or operator, if any.) 
Each additional establishment should be listed on a SEPARATE LINE. (For exceptions, PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS ON REVERSE SIDE OF FORM.) 



Establishment NAME, (your store or plant number, if any) 
ADDRESS of physical location, and 
Employer Identification Number (E.I.) 

(Enter ZIP code of physical location, i I known) 
(a) 



Kind of business activity 



Major activity 
of establishment 

Mark (X) one 

(b) 



List in order of importance the principal 
products made, lines of merchandise 
sold, types of services rendered, or 
construction activity performed. 

(c) 



Approximate 
number of 
employees 

Mark (X) one 
(d) 



FOR 

CENSUS 

USE 

(e) 



Enter Employer Identification 
Number (9 digits; »- 



[ 1 Manufacturing 

I Construction 
I I Minerals extraction 
I | Retail trade 
I I Wholesale trade 

I Manufacturers sales 
branch or office 

| Administrative office 
I | Other — Specify — >- 



2 □ Under 10 

3 □ 10-19 

4 □ 20-49 

5 □ 50-99 
r-j 100 or 

1 ' more 



Enter Employer Identification 
Number (9 digits) — »- 



I | Manufacturing 
I | Construction 

1 Minerals extraction 
^~J Retail trade 

| Wholesale trade 
I | Manufacturers sales 

branch or office 
3] Administrative office 
I I Other — Specify — ►- 



2 □ Under 10 

3 □ 10-19 

4 □ 20-49 

5 □ 50-99 

, I — | 100 or 

6 I — I m „ r . 



LISTING OF ADDITIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS ENGAGED IN CENSUS-COVERED ACTIVITIES-Continued 



Establishment NAME, (your store or plant number, if any) 
ADDRESS of physical location, and 
Employer Identification Number (E.I.) 

(Enter ZIP code of physical location, if known) 
(a) 



Kind of business activity 



Major activity 
of establishment 

Mark (X) one 

(b) 



List in order of importance the principal 
products made, lines of merchandise 
sold, types of services rendered, or 
construction activity performed. 

(c) 



Approximate 
number of 
employees 

Mark (X) one 
(d) 



FOR 

CENSUS 

USE 

(e) 



Enter Employer Identification 
Number (9 digits) »- 



I Manufacturing 

I Construction 
I I Minerals extraction 
I | Retail trade 
I | Wholesale trade 
I I Manufacturers sales 
branch or office 

I Administrative office 

I Other — Specify — >- 



2 □ Under 10 

4 □ 20-49 

5 □ 50-99 

, | 1 100 or 

' ' more 



Enter Employer Identification 
Number (9 digits) »_ 



| Manufacturing 
I Construction 
1 Minerals extraction 
| | Retail trade 
| Wholesale trade 
| Manufacturers sales 
branch or office 
Administra. 
I I Const: 

"extraction 
ail trade 
I I Wholesale trade 
(^Manufacturers sales 

branch or office 
I I Administrative office 
I I Other — Specify 



2 □ Under 10 

3 □ 10-19 

4 □ 20-49 

5 □ 50-99 
100 or 




INSTRUCTIONS - Activities for which separate line entries are NOT required. 

a. Separate line entries are NOT required for each construction site, and/or project 
(unless they are separate legal entities). Instead, list each construction main 
otticeor branch office directly responsible for such sites, projects, or work. 



_L 



b. Do NOT list any of your establ 
industries; Agriculture; Railroads; 
ations; Telephone and telegraph 
and networks; Banks and other fir 
than subdividers, land developers, 



4 □ 20-49 

5 □ 50-99 



100 or 
more 



shments primarily engaged in the following 
Airlines; Water Transportation; Pipe line oper- 
communications; Radio and television stations 
ancial agencies; Insurance; Real estate (other 
or operative builders, which should be listed). 



138 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DATE DUE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67110 



FORM NC-X3 
(0300) 



1967 CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, 
AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

GENERAL SCHEDULE 



Return to 



"\ Jeff 
-/ Jeff* 



ersonville Census Operations Office 
ersonville, Indiana 47130 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 

The Bureau of the Census is now conducting a census of 
establishments primarily engaged in the types of activities 
described in item 9 (on the reverse side). However, our 
records do not contain sufficient information on the kind of 
business or activity carried on at your establ i shment. Please 
complete item 1, Parts A and B below, to provide this infor- 
mation. Then proceed according to the instructions given in 
Part C (i.e., if you are primarily engaged in one of the busi- 
ness activities described in Part B, boxes 1-29, you are 
required to complete only item 1, sign the certification in 
item 12, and return the form in the envelope provided; other- 
wise, you ore required to complete the_ entire form). 

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

If you operated more than one establishment (or location) 
under the same Employer Identification Number shown in the 
address box, this report should include consolidated figures 
for all locations; in item 11, however, please provide infor- 
mation separately for each location. If your Employer Iden- 
tification Number was changed from that appearing in the 
address label, enter the currently assigned Employer Iden- 
tification Number for this establishment in item 3. 

Information provided by you on this report should account for 
your business activities for the entire year 1967. If book 
figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 



1. KIND OF BUSINESS 

Part A — Describe your kind of business or activity 
during 1967. 



Part B — Mark the box or boxes which best describe the 
kind of business or activity in which you were 
primarily engaged during 1967. 

Agriculture, forestry, fishery 

i 1 | Farm or ranch 

2 | | Agricultural, horticultural services (e.g., cotton 

ginning; corn shelling; contract grading fruits, 
vegetables) 

3 | | Poultry hatchery 

4 | | Veterinarian; animal hospital 

5 |~~~J Forestry (e.g., timber tracts, forest nursery) 

6 r~_~J Fishery 

Transportation (Do not mark box if business is a 
travel agency, bus line, public warehouse, or 
trucking firm.) 

.7 [~~~J Railroad 

8 | | Taxicab 

9 [~~~J Water transportation 

10 I | Air transportation 

1 1 r~~~J Pipeline 

Communication 

12 [~"_j Telephone or telegraph service 

13 [~~J Radio or television broadcasting 

14 (~~~j Electric, gas, sanitary services 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13, U.S. Code). By 
the same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen 
only by sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The 
law also provides that copies retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number^ 

NC-X3 (0300) 



Employer 
Identification No. J 



(Please correct if name or adores s has changed) 



2. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this establishment 
is known to the public? 



□ Ye 



| | No (If "No," enter trade name above the label.) 



b. Is the address in the label - 

( D Q] The mail address of your establishment but not the actual 
physical location. 

(2) H] The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

(3) [~~~J Neither of the above (e.g., accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are not shown 
in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you marked box 2, 
complete d and e below.) 



c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 



City, 



place 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street, give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 



d. Enter name of county in which 
your establishment is located 



e. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c' 



1 □ Yes 



2f"~-J No 



EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 

1 □ Yes 2 □ No (If "No," enter the 

currently assigned EI 
number here (9 digits).) 



labe 



4. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY Uk! 

OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT (Mark ONE box only) 

1 | | Individual proprietor 

2 | | Partnership 

r_~J Corporation (Do NOT mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 | ] Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 | | Other — Specify 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



139 



FORM NC-X3-Con. 



Finance, insurance, real estate 
15 [23 Finance (bank; credit agency; security dealer, 

exchange) 
t6 (23 Insurance 

17 Q~J Real estate (except hotel operation, land sub- 

dividers and developers, and operative builders) 

18 (23 Medical and other health service - doctor, dentist 

hospital, etc. (except dental laboratory) 

19 (23 Educational service (except barber, beauty, 

dancing school) 

Nonprofit membership organization 

20 [ | Trade association, board of trade, chamber 

of commerce 

21 (23 Professional membership organization 

22 [23 Labor union 

23 (23 Civic, social, fraternal association 

24 [23 Political organization 

25 | I Religious organization 

26 | | Charitable organization 

Miscellaneous services 

27 (23 Accounting, auditing, bookkeeping 

28 [23 Artist, writer, lecturer 

29 (23 Government organization 

30 (23 Other kind of business or activity 



Part C - Is the kind of business or activity in which this 
establishment was PRIMARILY ENGAGED in 
1967 described in boxes 1-29 above? 

(1) □ Yes (2>[23 No 

If "No," answer all remaining questions on 
this form. If "Yes," you need not answer the 
remaining questions, but complete the certifica- 
tion (item 12 on reverse side) and return this 
form in the envelope provided. 



PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this establishment in business at the end of 1967? 



1(23 Yes 



2(23 No 



(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive during December 
1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations answer "Yes," unless 
the establishment was not owned by you at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did you 
own this establishment? 



Months 



6. CLASS OF CUSTOMER LJLi 

Mark the box which indicates the class of customer accounting for more 
than half of your entry in item 8a. If no one class accounts for more 
than half, indicate the approximate percentage next to each box. 

1 | | % General public (household consumers, farmers, individuals) 

2 | | % Construction and building trade contractors 

3 | | % Other business firms, government, institutions 

4 (23 % Other - Specify 



7. METHOD OF SELLING 



1 X-5 
Mark only the ONE box which describes your principal method of selling 

1 (23 Selling at this establishment 

2 (23 ^ a '' ord e '' (catalog selling) 

3 I House-to-house (direct selling) 

4 | I Operating merchandise vending machines 



8. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND ANNUAL PAYROLL DURING 1967 



Line a — Sales of merchandise and other receipts from customers 
after deducting returns, allowances, and discounts. 

include all sales of merchandise (whether or not payment was 
received in 1967); all other receipts from customers for services, 
including repair, maintenance, delivery, and installation charges; 
all receipts from carrying charges or other charges for credit. 

Do not include income from investments; commissions from vend- 
ing machine operators; receipts from sale or rental of real estate, 
unless you are an operative or merchant builder (item 9, box 4 
below). 

Do not deduct trade-in allowances from sales. 

Line e — PAYROLL — Include all salaries, wages, commissions, 
bonuses, vacation allowances, andthe value of payments in kind 
such as goods, lodging, food, and clothing. Include tips, gra- 
tuities, etc., received by your employees from others. Do not in- 
clude payments to (or withdrawals by) owners or partners of un- 
incorporated businesses. 



a. Sales of merchandise and other 
receipts from customers 



Dollars 'Cents 



I 



XX 



b. Does the entry in "a" include sales and 
excise taxes collected from customers? . 



1(23 Yes 

2(23 No 



c. If "No," how much did you forward to 
Federal, State, and local taxing 
agencies for such taxes? 



d. Of the amount in line "a," what percent 
was for products manufactured by you at 
this location? 



e. Total annual payroll in 1967 before 
deductions 



Dollars 



Percent 



Dollars Cents 



XX 



X-7 



140 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM NC-X3-Con. 



9. KIND OF BUSINESS GROUP 

Part A — Mark only the ONE box for the group in which your kind of business fits best. 



1-5' 



1 | | Mining — Extracting or quarrying minerals (metallic and non- 

metallic ores; stone, sand, gravel; oil and gas; coal; etc.) 
minerals exploration and development; contract mineral 
services 

Construction 

2 3] General contractor (buildings, roads, etc.) 

3 3] Special trade contractor (painting, carpentry, 

plumbing, etc.) 

4 [ I Operative or merchant builder; land subdivider and 

developer 

5 3] Manufacturing — Fabricating, assembling, or processing 

materials into new products. Also includes such activities 
as: apparel jobbing, machine shop repair, and miscellaneous 
services "for the manufacturing trade" 

6 3] Public warehousing and storage 

Wholesale trade — Selling merchandise to retailers; to 
industrial, commercial, professional, institutional users; 
and to government 

7 3] Merchant wholesaler 

8 3] Merchandise agent or broker 

9 (31 Other type of wholesaler — Specify 



10 3] Retail trade — Selling merchandise to the general 

public; also, eating and drinking places, gasoline 
service stations 

Selected services 

1 1 3] Hotel, motel, tourist court, recreation camp 

12 3D Laundry, barber shop, or other services to individuals 

13 [31 Advertising or other services to businesses 

14 | | Repair service (autos, equipment, etc.) 

15 (31 Amusement, recreation place 

16 F3] Law firm 

17 3] Engineering and architectural firm 

18 | | Travel agency 

19 [3 Dental laboratory 

20 | | Tracking firm 

21 [3 Bus line (including charter) 

22 | | Other kind of business — Specify 



V 



Part B - Source of Receipts 
List below the principal lines of merchandise sold, types of construction activity, products manufactured or mined, or services 
performed and indicate the approximate percentage each was of your total receif 



em 8a) in 1967. 



Lines of merchandise sold, types of construction activity, types 
of services, and products manufactured or mined 



Percentage 
of total receipts 
shown in item 8a 



10. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. | | Mark this box if this business is owned or controlled by 

another company and enter the name, mailing address, and 
Employer Identification Number of owning or controlling 
company, if known. 



b. Q2] Mark this box if this business owns or controls any other 
company or companies and enter the name, mailing 
address, and Employer Identification Number of owned 
or controlled companies, if known. 



Name of company 



Mailing address — Number, street, city, State, ZIP code 



E.I. Number 



Name of company 



E.I. Number 



Mailing address — Number, street, city, State, ZIP code 



Name of company 



E.I. Number 



Mailing address — Number, street, city, State, ZIP code 



11. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate more than one establishment under the Employer Identification 

Number shown in the address label or in item 3? 1 (__] Yes 2 [__] No 

b. If "Yes," list separately below each establishment, including your main establishment and auxiliary 

facilities (such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Census 

use 
only 



Business receipts 

during 1967 



Dollars 



Number of paid 
employees 

(Pay period 
including 
March 12, 1967) 



XX 



XX 



TOTAL FOR THIS EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

(Sum of lines 1— 3 should be same as item 8a.) — — 



XX 



12 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



Telephone 



Number 



Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period fron 



Signature ot authorized person 



Title 



Use additional sheets of paper, if necessary, to complete any item or to submit any explanation. 
Identify each sheet with the Census File Number appearing in the address box. 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



141 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE - APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 4I-S67I10 



NC-X6 

1967 CENSUSES OF BUSINESS, MANUFACTURES, 
AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE 
OR AUXILIARY ESTABLISHMENT 



RETURN TO, 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 
Jeffersonville, Indiono 47130 



PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING REPORT 
If calander year rctords are not available, fiscal year reports for the periods 
ending between October 31, 1967 and February 29, 1968 are acceptable. If 
book records are not available, enter your best estimate. 



eport should c 



ablishment identified in the address label. 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be. seen only by sworn Census 
employees and maybe used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 






Employer Idenhfrt 



NC-X6 (0600) 



(PLEASE RETURN THIS COPY) 



ITEM 1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

o. Name of this establishment, if different from that appearing in the addn 



b. Is the address originally printed in the adi 
LOCATION OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT? 



□ v. 



■ Complete lines (3) and (4) 



i bos the ACTUAL PHYSICAL 

| No - Complete lines (1) through (4) 



ITEM 2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address labe 
the SAME as' that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 Em 
ployer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941' 



□ Yes | | No -(If "No." please 
enter the currently 
assigned EI Number 
here (9 digits) , 



(1) Number and sti 



City, village, or other pla 



NOTE - If location cannot be described by number and street, give name or number of 

highway and approximate distance from nearest town. 
(3) County in which your establishment is 

physically located? 



(4) Is the 



ablishment physically located within 



ITEM 3. LEGAL FORM OF OWNERSHIP OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □individual proprietor 

2 □Partnership 

1 | Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 1 | Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



the boundaries of the 



ilia 



■□Ye 



2QNo 



ITEM 4. PRINCIPAL ACTIVITY OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT IN 1967 

Mark the ONE item that best describes the principol activity of this establishment. If none applies, mark item (i) and enter a description of your 
principal activity. Mark one item only. 



a. I I 1 Centralized administration (i.e., supervisory 
functions of a central, home, general, branch, 

divisional or district office) 

b. (□ 1 Management and other supporting services (e.g 

purchasing or buying office, accounting olfice, 
legal office, public relations office, etc.) 



c. □ 3 Warehousing 

d. □ 7 Chainstore warehousing (i.e., a 

combination of administrative and 
warehousing activities described 
in a, b, and c) 

e. □ 2 Research, development, and testing 



f. ] | 4 Trading stamp redempti 

g. □ 8 Selling 

h. □ 9 Repair service 

i. □ 9 Other (Describe; 



ITEM 5. PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES OF YOUR COMPANY SERVICED BY THIS ESTABLISHMENT IN 1967 

a. Does this establishment perform the above described management, general administrative 

functions, or other supporting services primarily for establishments of your company 1 | | Yes — Comi 

(rather than for other business firms or for the general public)? 5b, c 



2QNo - Skip to 



b. Does this eslablishrr 
for ALL establishmi 
all its subsidiaries t 



'F? 



nt and adn 



t>l. 



any" refers lo the parent fii 



'□Ye 



2QNc 



. Mark the principol kind of business or industrial activity of the establishments of your 
1 \ J Minerals extraction, quarrying, production, or exploration 

2 [ | Manufacturing (fabricating, assembling, or processing materials into new 
products; also includes publishing and printing) 

3 | | Construction (including general contracting, subcontracting, home building, 
and land subdividing and developing) 



i that are managed or serviced by this central office or auxiliary. 

4 Q3 Manufacturer sales branches or other 

wholesale operations 

5 Q Retail stores 

6 □ Other (Describe; 



d. List in order of impor 
establishments that i 



(1). 
(2)_ 



, the principal products made, lines of i 
anaged or serviced by this central offict 



chandise sold, ty 



ces rendered, or construction activities performed by the 



ITEM 6. PAYROLL AND EMPLOYMENT AT THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 



Report the payroll and number of persons employed at this 
personnel. Do not include employees working in or from i 
however, even though paid from this location. (The n urn be 



stablishmenl, including 
ler establishments of y< 
nd payroll of such 



be included in the 1967 Census reports for the establishments at which they 



iuch employees should 
were actually employed.) 



Payroll during 1967. (Enter the total 
wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions 
ana other remuneration paid to employe 
of this establishment during 1967, befo 
payroll deductions) 



b. Number of employees at this establishment 
duringthepay period including March 12, 1967 



THOUSANDS of 

dollars IJOOQ) 



flere the employees and payroll reported in items 6a and 6b above also reported in any other 1967 Census 
establishment report form of your company (i.e., in the Census Forms MA-, MC-, CB-, or CC- series)? 

1 [ | Yes - If "Yes; 1 please give the ll-digit CENSUS FILE NUMBER of that report . 



2 0.No 



ITEM 7. EMPLOYMENT BY FUNCTION DURING THE PAY PERIOD INCLUDING 
MARCH 12, 1967 



Distribute the number of employees reporte 
at this establishment during the pay period 



n item 6b according lo the 
eluding March 12, 1967. 



fthere establishment records do not provide actual employee counts in terms of the functio 
listed, estimates of the approximate number in each are acceptable. Those persons perform r 
a variety of functions should be reported in their primary activity during that pay period, 
allocated on some other reasonable and consistent basis (e.g., by converting the total numl 
of man-hours or man-days expended during the pay period into the average number of employe 
in earh activity). 



Type of function perfo 



. Centralized administration (e.g., various maiiagei 
functions of a general, home, or district office) 



b. Research, development, and testing 



d. Sales to customers directly from thi 



e. Trading stamp redempti 



f. Other (Describe) 



TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 
(Sum of lines o through f; 
should equal item 6b) 



number of 
employees 



page 2 



142 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM NC-X6-Con. 



FORM NC-X6 



Pa **2 



Report all figures in THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ($000), except Item 15. If none applies, enter "0" or "NONE." 



ITEM 8. SALES MADE BY THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 TO CUSTOMERS 
OUTSIDE YOUR COMPANY 

. Report all sales made by this establishment during 1967 (merchandise sales, receipts for services, 
and other business receipts) to customers outside your company. 

Include excise taxes and sales taxes paid directly to taxing agencies. 

Exclude intracompany transfers to other domestic establishments of your company; however, include 
export transfers to your foreign subsidiaries. Exclude sales to outside customers made by OTHER 
establishments of your company, even though billed centrally by this establishment. (Report such 
sales on the 1967 Census forms of these other establishments.) 



, Sales mode by this establishment 
during 1967 to customers outside 
your company 



THOUSANDS 
of dollars 
(1000) 



b. List principal products sold or services rendered by this establishment to customers outside your company, in order of importance of sales and receipts 



in. 

(2). 



(3). 

(4) 



ITEM 9. BILLINGS BY THIS ESTABLISHMENT IN 1967 TO RETAIL STORES OF 
YOUR COMPANY 

Report at cost value all merchandise billed by this establishment in 1967 to retail stores of your 
company. Include all billings, whether or not the merchandise was shipped directly by the supplier 
to your retail stores or shipped from this establishment. 

Exclude purchases made directly by your individual stores. Exclude billings to establishments 
other than your retail stores. Exclude sales to retail stores of other companies, and franchise sales 
(which should be reported in item 8a above). 



Total billings by this establishment in 
1967 to retail stores of your company 



THOUSANDS 
of dollars 
(8000) 



Key 



ITEM 10. INVENTORIES AT BEGINNING AND END OF 1967 

Report all inventories of this establishment al current cost (if feasible), rather than sales price. 
Exclude inventories reported by other establishments of your company on their 1967 Census estab- 
lishment forms. 



Value of inventories of this establishment: 
a. BEGINNING of 1967 



b. END of 1967 



ITEM 11. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES FOR THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 
(EXCLUDE LAND AND MINERAL RIGHTS) 

Report all capital expenditures actually made during 1967 for this establishment, inclu 
alterations, capitalized repairs and improvements. ^'Capital expenditures'* refer to oil 
are chargeable to fixed assets accounts for which depreciation or amortization account 
narily maintained. 

Include the cost of all improvements and new construction at this establishment which w 

gress but had not been completed at the end of 1967. 

Include expenditures made by your company (or any of its subsidiaries) for structures ■ 

completion, were or are to be sold and leased back, to this establishment. 

Exclude the cost of land and mineral rights. 

Exclude the cost of maintenance and repairs charged as current operating expense. 

Exclude capital expenditures made by outside owners of property rented or leased to this i 

ment. Exclude capital expenditures made by this establishment for other locations of your 



ding major 
costs that 
; are ordi- 

ere in pro- 

hich, upon 



stablish- 
rompany. 



Type of capital expenditures: 
a. New structures and additions 
to plant 



achinery and new equipment 



. Used plant and used equipment 
acquired from others 



TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 

DURING 1967 

(Sum of lines a, b, and c) 



ITEM 12. CHANGES IN GROSS (BOOK) VALUE OF FIXED ASSETS OF THIS 
ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 

Report the changes in gross (book) value of fixed assets of this estoblishment for which deprecia- 
tion and amortization accounts are ordinarily maintained. "Gross (book) value" represents the ac- 
quisition cost (original cost or other basis) to your company of such fixed assets. 
Include all depreciable fixed assets (buildings, structures, machinery, equipment, etc.), and all 
amortizable fixed assets. 

Include all improvements and new construction "in progress" during 1967 but not yet completed at 
the end of 1967. Also include the value of fixed assets owned by this establishment dui leased or 
rented to other companies. 

Include the valueof fixed assets owned by your company or any of its subsidiaries but "leased" to 
this establishment. 



. Cross (book) value of fixed assets 
at BEGINNING of 1967 



. Total capital expenditures during 1967 
(Copy figure from item lid) 



. Gross (book) value of fixed assets 
sold, retired, scrapped, or destroyed 
during 1967 



Exclude the value or fixed assets of other loc 
for which this establishment maintains records 



of your company (or any of its subsidi; 



. Gross (book) value of fixed assets, 
at END of 1967. (Should equal 
lines a + b - c. If not, please 
comment in "Remarks.") 



ITEM 13. RENTAL PAYMENTS MADE FOR THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 
(EXCLUDE LAND) 

Report all rental payments made or accrued during 1967 to OUTSIDE firms which own llie plant and 
equipment rented or leased by this establishment. Exclude rental payments made by this establish- 
ment lo vour parent i ompany or any of its subsidiaries. (The value of such company-owned assets 
should be reported in item 12, however, as if actually owned by this establishment.) Exclude rent- 
al payments made by this establishment for plant and equipment located at other establishments of 
your company. 

In reporting rents paid (or equivalent charges) for use of "Buildings and structures," exclude sep- 
arately identified fees for leasing of land (such as ground rents). 

Under "Machinery and equipment," be sure to include rental payments, (or equivalent charges), for 
use of transportation equipment, office equipment, computer systems, passenger cars, and all other 
types of machinery or equipment. 



Rental payments made fo 



, For use of BUILDINGS AND 
STRUCTURES (excluding land) 



b. For use of MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT 



TOTAL RENTAL PAYMENTS 
(Sum of lines a and b) 



ITEM 14. COST OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PERFORMED AT THIS 
ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 

"Cost" should include all costs incurred at this establishment during 1967 to support research and 
development activities (i.e. wages and salaries; direct materials costs; services and supporting 
costs; and an appropriate share of depreciation and overhead). If this establishment performed re- 
search and development for other companies on contract during 1967, include the total amount charged 
for such work performed. {Also, report such receipts in item 8 above.) 



Type of reseorch and development perfo 
a. Federal contracts and subcontracts 



b. Other research and development 

initiated with funds of your company 
or other (non-Federal) sources 



TOTAL COST OF RESEARCH AND 
DEVELOPMENT DURING 1967 
(Sum of lines o ond b) 



ITEM 15. WAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE, AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1967 

If you reported any employees in item 7, line c, "Warehousing," complete this item. 
Line a. Exclude floor space occupied by interior walls, permanent aisles, elevator shafts 
riving and shipping platforms, etc. 



cupiable floor 
"upied and uno 
ablishment 



pace (under roof) ■ 
cupied - of this 



Square fe 



Line b. Nel piling 
wall and from floor 



e is space for storing commodities — inside space measured from wall lo 
iling, less space for ventilation (outside of the pilings), coils, aisles, posts 



b. Refrigerated (nel piling) space, 50 
degrees Fahrenheit or below, in this 



REMARKS 



ITEM 16. 



CERTIFICATION 



Vddrcss (Number and street, .-ify, St.ire) 



u-i.s lit.- i.muil li 



GENERAL QUESTIONNAIRES 



143 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DATE DUE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budgel Bureau No. 41-567067 



FORM NC-K13 



1967 CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



COMPANY EXPLORATION EXPENDITURES AND ASSETS FOR 
OIL AND GAS FIELD OPERATIONS 



RETURN TO 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 

Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



CENSUS USE ONLY 



NOTICE - Response lo this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the 
same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by 



sworn Census employ 
lso provides that co 



ay be used only for 
ned in your files a: 



ical purposes. The law 
from legal process. 



In correspondence ptrtalnlng to this report 
rofer to this Ctnsus File Number^/ 



NC-K13 (9913) 



KEEP THIS COPY FOR YOUR FILES 

PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN THE FORM WHICH 
SHOWS YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS 

(Please correct if mailing address has changed) 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



As part of the 1967 Census of Mineral Industries, the Bureau of the 
Census is conducting this survey of domestic oil and gas field explo- 
ration expenditures and company assets on a net working interest 
basis. This form is designed to summarize company figures for items 
which are inappropriate for respondents to report onan operator basis. 

All figures reported on this form should be on a net working interest 
basis. By contrast, figures reported on form MC-13A for oil and gas 
field operations represent a company operated basis and include data 
for properties operated both for own account and for others but ex- 
clude data forproperties ownedby your company but operated by others. 

Include on a consolidated basis in this report data for domestic 
oil and gas field properties owned by all subsidiaries and divisions 
of your company. 

If you have also received form NC-Kl, "Company Summary Report," 
figures on that form should represent your entire company activities, whereas 
figures on this form (NC-K13) should represent only your oil and 
gas field activities. In addition, since the NC-Kl form was designed 
to apply to all large manufacturing, minerals, and business com- 
panies there are some differences in the definitions included on that 
form as compared to this one. Your report on NC-K13, of course, 
should exclude all data for natural gas liquids plants, pipelines, 
natural gas distribution systems, petroleum refineries, bulk tank 
stations, filling stations, or other activities of your company which 
should, however, be included on your form NC-Kl report. 

ESTIMATES ARE ACCEPTABLE - We recognize that there is no 
uniform system of account-ng for all companies and that reporting on 
this form may require that some companies use estimates. If you do 
not have records showing the items requested, approximate figures 
will be acceptable. 



Section I - EXPLORATION EXPENDITURES DURING 1967 - Report 
charges to both the current expense and capital accounts for 1967. 

Column (B) — Report expenditures for acquiringnonproducing acreage, 
including lease bonuses and any other outlays necessary to acquire 
leases, mineral rights, and fee lands incident to oil and gas explo- 
ration except land department, leasing, and scouting expenditures. 

Column (C) — Report expenditures for lease rents and other expendi- 
tures for carrying leases, such as shut-in royalties and annual payments. 

Column (D) — Report all land department, scouting, and lease acqui- 
sition expenditures except the actual outlays for purchase or land 
leasing reported under columns (B) and (C). 

Column (E) — Report all geological and geophysical expenditures, 
including core drilling and other drilling where the intention is not 
to complete the well as a producing well. 



Columns (G),(H), and (I) — Report all expenditures for 1967 (reduced 
by amount of outside contributions) for drilling exploratory wells 
including wells still drilling at the end of the year. Report payments 
to contractors and direct expenditures for labor, supplies, water, 
fuel, and power used. Include expenditures for casing, tubing, and 
wellhead fittings associated with exploratory wells; expenditures for 
roads, grading, etc.; and all other expenditures incident to exploratory 
drilling. Exclude material salvaged after use, but include the cost 
of salvaging. Exclude all expenditures for equipment beyond the 
Christmas tree and expenditures for all down-hole pumping and arti- 
ficial lift equipment. 

Column (J) — Report all contributions paid toward test wells. 

Column (K) — Report all other expenditures which relate to explora- 
tion for oil and gas, including direct overhead. 



Section II - GROSS BOOK VALUE OF OIL AND GAS FIELD ASSETS 

AT THE END OF 1967 - Report your own net working interest value 
before depreciation and amortization of all oil and gas assets owned, 
as per your books, whether operated or nonoperated, excluding the 
value of any assets belonging to others on property which you report. 
Enter the original or acquisition cost of the fixed assets on the books 
of this company such as mineral properties, buildings, structures, 
machinery, and equipment; capitalized drilling and completion costs; 
and other fixed assets for which depreciation, depletion, or amortiza- 
tion reserves are ordinarily maintained. 

Under mineral properties (leasehold investment) report acquisition 
and capitalized development costs. 

Column (B) - Report data for properties being held for later explo- 
ration and properties shut-in at the end of 1967. 



Column (C) — Report data for properties 
end of 1967. 



rvhich 



at the 



Column (D) - Report data for properties on which work is being done 
at the end of 1967 and which has been capitalized, but for which it 
is not yet possible to determine whether the properties will be 
productive. 

Column (E) — Under buildings, other structures, and machinery, in- 
clude lease tanks, lines up to delivery end of lease tanks and de- 
livery gas meter, oil and gas field rail and other roads, and power 
plants. Include drilling rigs, lease equipment, motors, as well as 
furniture andfixtures for offices, cafeterias, change rooms, and trans- 
portation equipment. Report value of assets for all types of equipment 
for which capital expenditures are reported on form MC-13A under 
items 7b, 7c, and 7d. 



Please 

comp/efe 

poge 2 

before 

signing 

here 



of person to < 



-egarding this report 



Address (Number and street, city, State) 



Telepho 



CERTIFICATION - Th.( 






Signature of authorized persoa 



144 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM NC-K13-Con. 



Form NC-K13 




























Page 2 


COMPANY EXPLORATION EXPENDITURES AND ASSETS - OIL AND GAS FIELD OPERATIONS 

Report net workinq interest in thousands of dollars 


Section I - EXPLORATtON EXPENDITURES DURING 1967 


Li 


2-1 


2-2 


2-3 


2-4 


2-5 


2-6* 


2 | 2-1 


2-2 [ 2-3 2-4 


2-5 


2-6 


Geographic 
area 


Key 


Total 

(Sum of 
columns 
(B)-(E) 

and 
(G)-(K)) 

(A) 


Lease and 

land 

acquisitions 

of 

non producing 

acreage 

(B) 


Lease 
rents 

(C) 


Land 

department, 

leasing, 

and 
scouting 

(D) 


Geological 

and 
geophysical 

<E) 


Key 
(F) 


Drilling and equipping wells 


Contributions 
paid 


Other 
(K) 


Dry 
(G) 


Successful 
(H) 


In 
progress 

(1) 


Northeast 1 


1000 


1 


t 


s 


s 


t 


1001 


s 


S 


! 


t 


f 


East North Central 2 


2300 












2301 












West North Central^ 


2400 












2401 












South Atlantic 4 


3500 












3501 












East South Central 5 


3600 












3601 












West South Central 
Arkansas 


3710 












3711 












Lousiana 


3720 












3721 












Oklahoma 


3730 












3731 












Texas 


3740 












3741 












Mountain 
New Mexico 


4850 












4851 












Other 6 


4890 












4891 












Pacific 
California 


4930 












4931 












Other 7 


4990 












4991 












United States, total 


5550 












5551 












Section II - GROSS BOOK VALUE OF OIL AND GAS FIELD ASSETS AT END OF 1967 


Li 


2-1 


2-2 


2-3 2-4 2-5 


2-6 


Geographic 
area 


Key 


Total 

(Sum of columns 
(B)-(E» 

(A) 


Mineral properties (leasehold investment) 


Buildings, 

structures 

machine 

(exclude 

(E) 


other 
and 

•y 

and) 


Nonproducing 

properties 

(B) 


Producing 

properties 

(CI 


Work in 
progress 
(Dl 


Northeast 1 


1002 


t 


t 


t 


s 


t 


East North Central 2 


2302 












West North Central 3 


2402 












South Atlantic'' 


3502 












East South Central 5 


3602 












West South Central 
Arkansas 


3712 












Lousiana 


3722 












Oklahoma 


3732 












Texas 


3742 












Mountain 
New Mexico 


4852 












Other* 


4892 












Pacific 
California 


4932 












Other 1 


4992 












United Stotes, total 


5552 












^Northeast — Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. 

^East North Central — Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin. 

-*West North Central — Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. 

4 South Atlantic — Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. 

^East South Central — Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi. 

^Mountain, Other — Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada. 

Pacific, Other — Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and Hawaii. 


Remarks 





CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



145 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: April 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41— S670I7 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required 
by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same law, 
your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. 
It may be seen only by sworn Census employees 
and may be used only for statistical purposes, 
The law also provides that copies retained in 
your files are immune from legal process. 



FORM CB-AS-1 (7319) 

19- 12-67) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 
BUSINESS CLASSIFICATION REPORT 



Please complete and return this form in the envelope provided. 



1. Check the ONE box which best 
describes the business of this 
establ i shment in 1967. 



A-21 



form CB-AS-1 (7319) 



731310-9 

73 1320-8 
73 1900-7 



Radio and Television 
Representative 

Publisher's Representative 

Miscellaneous Advertising 

Other — Describe- y 



Please complete inquiries and sign certification on reverse side 



2. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 



a. Is ihe name shown in the label the name by which this 5-2 
establishment is known to the puhlic? 



□ Ye 



D No (If "No." enter trade 
name above the label.) 



h. Is the address in the label — 

1. □ The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. □ The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street I which also is its actual physical location. 

3. □ Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3. or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e. If you 
marked box 2. complete d and e. ► 



c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 


City, village, or other place 


State 


ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located __ 



e. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "e"? 

1 D Yes 2D No 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact 



Address (No., St., City, State, ZIP code) 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Telephone (Area code, No., Ext.) 



Date 



146 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67115 



FORM CB-40 

(4000) 



US. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES 



TRUCK CARRIERS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Please complete and return this form in the envelope provided. 

Each carrier that renders services authorized by certificates or permits 
issued (or pending) by the Interstate Commerce Commission should 
answer only items 1-3 and 18. All other carriers should complete the 
entire report. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967, submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are main- 
tained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Numbers 



CB-40 (4000) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



KEEP THIS COPY FOR YOUR FILES 



PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN THE FORM WHICH 
SHOWS YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS 



1. NAME AND LOCATION OF HOME OFFICE 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this firm is 
known to the public? 

D Yes □ No (If "No," enter firm name above the label.) 

b. Is the address shown the actual physical location of the home 
office of this company? 



□ Ye 



□ No 



If "No," enter below the number, street, city. State, and ZIP code of 
this firm's main office. 



Number and street 



State 



City, village, or other place 



ZIP code 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this firm on your latest 1967 Employer's Quar- 
terly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes 



□ No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 




3, INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION DOCKET NO. 

If the carrier (individual or company) in 1967 was engaged in a service 
under an Interstate Commerce Commission authorization (either 
pending or granted), enter the docket number in the space below and 
skip to item 18. 



MC 



4. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

□ Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



X-.t 



5. PRINCIPAL TYPE OF SERVICE 

Mark the box pertaining to the principal type of service 
covered by this report. (Mark one box only) 

1. □ Local 

2. □ Intercity 



MT 



Local service means transportation performed within city or town 
including the adjoining suburban area, whether or not a State line 
is crossed. 

Intercity means all other regular route service. 



6. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this firm in operation 
at the end of 1967? 



X-2 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



(NOTE: For firms which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations 

answer "Yes," unless the firm was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months' operation are 
covered by this report? 



Months 



X-3 



7. PRINCIPAL TYPE OF OPERATION (Mark one box only) 

1. □ Common Carrier 

2. □ Contract Carrier 

3. □ Other -Specify 



1-2 



8. TYPE OF CARRIER (Mark one box only) 

1. □ Carrier of general freight 

2. D Carrier of household goods 

3. □ Carrier of sand and gravel 

4. □ Garbage collection 

5. D Retail store delivery vehicle 

6. □ Carrier of agricultural products and other 

commodities that are. exempt from Interstate 
Commerce Commission regulations. 

7. □ Carrier of other commodities 



13 



9. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box □ if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, 
ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 digits) 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



147 



FORM CB-40-Con. 



10. OPERATING REVENUES AND RECEIPTS IN 1967 


I Do not include an> nonoperating income (interest, dividends, loans, sale of 
real estate) in any part of this item. 

Line a — Include all revenues from the transportation of freight by motor 
vehicles, the rental and lease of vehicles with drivers, and any other operating 
revenue. 

Line b— Report income received from others for the rental of vehicles without 
drivers, and for the rental of other motor carrier property. 

Line c — Include all receipts from nonmotor carrier operations such as the 
sale of commodities, or the furnishing of service indirectly related to motor 
carrier operations. 


a. Total operating revenues from 
motor carrier operations 


Dollars Cents 


Key 


! XX 


14 


b. Rental income from motor 
carrier property 


| XX 


1-5 


c. Other operating receipts and 
sale of commodities 


j XX 


16T 


d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through c) 


1 XX 


X-4 


11. PAYROLL IN 1967 


Line a— Include all salaries, wages, commissions, bonuses, vacation allow- 
ances, and the value of payments in kind, such as goods, lodging, food and 
clothing. Include reported tips, gratuities, etc.. received by your employees 
from others. Payments to salaried officers and executives of corporations 
should be included. Do not include payments to (or withdrawals by) owners 
or partners of unincorporated businesses. 

Line b— Include payments to or withdrawals by owners or partners of unincor- 
porated businesses. 


a. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 


Dollars Cents 


Key 


1 XX 


X-.S* 


b. Withdrawals and salaries paid 
owners and partners of 
unincorporated businesses 


1 XX 


17* 


12. EXPENSES (other than payroll) DURING 1967 


Line a — Employer contributions under the Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act (FICA); the Federal I nemployment Tax Act: any payments or allocations 
to other employee benefits such as State Temporary Disability and Workman's 
Compensation. 1 nemployment Compensation, Health and Welfare, savings 
and deferred profit sharing plans; and premiums for life, disability, sickness 
and medical insurance. 

Line b— Report the total of sales, excise and gross receipts, turnover, and 
similar taxes and franchise and license fees, including vehicle licenses and 
fees, and real estate and real property taxes payable during 1967. Do not 
include Federal or State taxes on payroll or taxable income. 

Line c— Report the amount as on your books, of depreciation in 1967 of 
buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, and other equipment. 

Line e— Include only direct payments for heating fuel, light, power, and 
water used in your business. 

Line f— Cost (other than payroll) of operating and maintaining vehicles 
including cost of fuel, lubricants, repairs, etc. 

Line g — Include rental expense of offices, terminals, and other facilities. If 
the firm owns its own facilities do not include equivalent space rental on this 
line. 

Line h— Report all operating expenses not reported elsewhere on this form, 
but exclude interest on loans or other indebtedness. Include payments to 
other firms for rental of vehicles or other equipment; advertising, accounting, 
legal, communications, and other services: insurance and safety, except 
for the account of employees; station expenses and shipping, storage, and 
other handling costs incidental to the delivery of goods to your customers. 
Also include amounts set aside for bad debt losses, the amount not compen- 
sated for by insurance from accidental loss or damage to capital, and losses 
by theft (not reflected in merchandise inventory account). 


a. Employer contributions to 

unemployment insurance, pension, 
welfare and other insurance plans 


Dollars | Cents 


Key 


XX 


3-1 


b. Taxes and licenses fees 

(excluding income or payroll taxes) 


! XX 


3-2 


c. Depreciation 


XX 


3-3 


d. Purchases of all types of office 
supplies, stationery, and postage 


1 XX 


3-4 


e. Payments for electricity, heating 
fuel, and water 


j XX 


3-5 


f. Cost of operating and 
maintaining vehicles 


1 XX 


3-6 


g. Office, other space rental 


' XX 


3-7 


h. Other operating expenses not 
reported elsewhere (excluding 
interest on loans) 


j XX 


3-8 


i. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through h) 


| XX 


3-9* 


13. What percent of your firm's expenses and payroll (line 11a plus line 12i) 
are the result of nonmotor carrier operations? 


Percent 


Key 


% 


4-1 


14. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (excluding land) IN 1967 


Capital expenditures refer to all costs actually incurred during 1967 (whether 
on contract or by your own forces) which are chargeable to the fixed assets 
accounts of this firm and which are of the type for which depreciation accounts 
are normally maintained. 

Include expenditures for new and used structures, fixtures, and equipment, 
including those under construction at the end of 1967; and expenditures for 
additions, major alterations, capitalized repairs, and improvements to existing 
facilities. Also, include expenditures made by your firm for structures which, 
on completion, were or are to be sold or leased by your firm. 

Do nol include expenditures for land; cost of maintenance, repairs, supplies, 
or other items chargeable as current operating expenses. Exclude capital 
expenditures made by owners of property rented or leased to you. 

If, during 1967. you did not make any expenditures of the kinds described 
above, enter "0" on line d. 


a. New structures and related facilities 
(Include business structures, ware- 
houses, offices, garages, etc.) and 
establishment sites (roads, fences, 
parking lots, etc.) 


Dollars 1 Cents 


Key 


XX 


4-2 


b. New machinery and equipment 

(1) Motor vehicles (Include automobiles, 
trucks, truck tractors, trailers, 
semitrailers, and buses. Do not 
deduct the value of trade-ins! 


1 XX 


4-3 


(2) All other machinery I Include fork 
lifts, hand trucks, conveyors, office 
furniture, fixtures and equipment! 


j XX 


4-4 


c. Used structures, machinery and equip- 
ment (acquired from others and 
subject to capital depreciation) 
(1) Motor vehicles (as described on 
line 14b(l) above) 


XX 


4-5 


(2) All other used structures, 
machinery, and equipment 


XX 


4-6 


d. TOTAL capital expenditures 
(Sum of lines a, b, and c) 


XX 


4-7 



148 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-40-Con. 



15. GROSS BOOK VALUE OF FIXED ASSETS AS OF END OF 1967 


Line a — Report the original cost of fixed assets on the books of this firm, such 
as buildings, structures, machinery, for which depreciation reserves are main- 
tained. The value of assets reported in line a should include all the types of 
items for which capital expenditures are reported in 14a. 

Line b — Include all types of items for which capital expenditures are reported 
in 14b. 

Used assets purchased during the year should be included at their market 
value rather than original book value. 


a. Buildings and other structures 
(exclude land) as described in 
item 14a 


Dollars ] Cents 


K.y 


i XX 


4-8 


b. Machinery and equipment 

(1) Motor vehicles (as described 
in item 14b(l)) 


XX 


4-9 


(2) All other machinery and equipment 
(Include office, warehouse and 
terminal equipment, as described 
in item 14b(2).) 


XX 


4-10 


c. TOTAL value of fixed assets 
(Sum of lines a and b) 


1 XX 


4-11* 


16. INTERCITY OPERATING STATISTICS, 1967 


a. Freight revenue from intercity service 


Dollars | Cents 


Key 


XX 


5-1 


b. Owned and leased truck and tractor miles operated 
in intercity service (Include loaded and empty) 


Miles 


5-2 


c. Tons of revenue freight carried in intercity service 


Tons 


5-3* 


17. REVENUE FREIGHT CARRYING EQUIPMENT AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1967 

Show the number of vehicles owned or leased in use or held for use in motor carrier 
operations, including those undergoing repairs at the close of the year 1967. 




L?_ 


8 1 


8-2 8-3 8-4 8-5 


8 6 8 7 8 8 8 9 8 10* 






Code 


Registration status of trucks 


Type of fuel used 


Vehicle type 


Number registered in — 


Total 
number 
of trucks 
(sum of 
columns 
UH3)) 
(4) 


Number of trucks using — 

(Total of columns (5)-(9) must 

equal column (4)) 


1 State 

(1) 


2 States 

(2) 


More 

than 

2 States 

(3) 


Gasoline 

(5) 


Diesel 

(6) 


LP gas 

(7) 


Electricity 

(8) 


Other fuel 

(9) 


a. Trucks 


101 




















b. Truck tractors 


102 




















c. Semitrailers 


103 




















d. Full trailer 


104 




















e. Other (Specify) 


105 




















This space may be used for any explanation that may be helpful in understanding your report. 


18. 
CERTIFICATION 


Name of person to contact regarding this report 


Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 


Telephone No. 


Area code 


Number 


Extension 


This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from to 






Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 



FORM CB-40 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



149 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau Nu. 4-1 -.S67 1 1 



FORM CB-41 

(4100) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES 



BUS CARRIER SURVEY 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Please complete and return this form in the envelope provided. 

Each carrier that renders services authorized by certificates or permits 
issued (or pending) by the Interstate Commerce Commission should 
answer only items 1, 2, 3, and 16. All other carriers should complete 
the entire report. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or. if records are main- 
tained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due dale, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130, 



NOTICE -Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number^ 



CB-41 (4100) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND LOCATION OF HOME OFFICE 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this firm is 
known to the public? 

□ Yes D No (If "No," enter firm name above the label.) 

b. Is the address shown the actual physical location of the home 
office of this company? 

D Yes D No 

If "No," enter below the number, street, city. State, and ZIP code of 
this firm's main office. 



Number and street 



State 



City, village, or other place 



ZIP code 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (Ell Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this firm on your latest 1967 Employer's Quar- 
terly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes D No (If "No," enter the 

currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION DOCKET NO. 

If the carrier (individual or company) in 1967 was engaged in a service 
under an Interstate Commerce Commission authorization (either 
pending or granted), enter the ducket number in the space below and 
skip to item 16. 



MC 



4. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



X-lf 



5. 



PRINCIPAL TYPE OF SERVICE 

Mark the box pertaining to the principal type of service 
covered by this report. (Mark one box only) 



l-l| 



1. D Local 

2. □ Intercity 

3. □ Charter or special 

4. □ Sightseeing 



5. □ Airport 

6. Q Other — Specify 



Local service means transportation performed within city or town 
including the adjoining suburban area, whether or not a State line 
is crossed. 

Intercity means all other regular route service. 



PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this firm in business 
at the end of 1967? 



X-2 



1 □ Yes 



2 D No 



(NOTE: For firms which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations 

answer "Yes." unless the firm was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this firm? 



Months 



X-3 



COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this business is owned or controlled by another 

company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 



j. Mark this box D if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 digits) 



8. OPERATING REVENUES AND RECEIPTS IN 1967 



Do not include any nonoperating income (interest, dividends, loans, sale of 
real estate) in any part of this item. 

Line a — Include all revenues earned from the transportation of passengers 
over regularly operated routes, and amounts earned in charter, special or 
other contract services. 

Line b — Include operating revenues such as rental or lease of vehicles 
with drivers, profit on sale of materials and supplies, revenue from trans- 
portation of baggage, mail, and express; income paid to you by concession 
operators at stations, vending machine operators, parcel rooms or gross 
receipts from concessions owned by you. 

Line c — Report income received from others for the rental of vehicles with- 
out drivers, and for the rental of other motor carrier property. 

Line d — Include all receipts from nonmotor carrier operations such as the 
sale of commodities, or the furnishing of services indirectly related to motor 
carrier passenger operations. 



a. Transportation revenue — passenger 



b. Other carrier operating revenue 



c. Rental income from motor 
carrier property 



d. Other operating receipts and 
sale of commodities 



e. TOTAL-lSum of lines a through d) 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



Key 



1-2 



1-3 



14 



1-5J 



X-4 



150 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-41 -Con. 



9. PAYROLL IN 1967 


Line a — Include all salaries, wages, commissions, bonuses, vacation allow- 
ances, and the value of payments in kind, such as goods, lodging, food and 
clothing. Include reported tips, gratuities, etc., received by your employees 
(rom others. Payments to salaried officers and executives of corporations 
should be included. Do not include payments to (or withdrawals by) owners 
or partners of unincorporated businesses. 

Line b— Include payments to or withdrawals by owners or partners of unincor- 
porated businesses. 


a. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 


Dollars 


Cents 


Key 




XX 


X-5* 


b. Withdrawals and salaries paid 
owners and partners of 
unincorporated businesses 




XX 


1-6* 


10. EXPENSES (other than payroll) DURING 1967 


Line a — Employer contributions under the Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act (FICA); the Federal Unemployment Tax Act; any payments or allocations 
to other employee benefits such as State Temporary Disability and Workman's 
Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, Health and Welfare, savings 
and deferred profit sharing plans; and premiums for life, disability, sickness 
and medical insurance. 

Line b — Report the total of sales, excise and gross receipts, turnover, and 
similar taxes and franchise and license fees, including vehicle licenses and 
fees, and real estate and real property taxes payable during 1967. Do not 
include Federal or State taxes on payroll or taxable income. 

Line c — Report the amount as on your books, of depreciation in 1967 of 
buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, and other equipment. 

Line e — Include only direct payments for heating fuel, light, power, and 
water used in your business. 

Line f— Cost (other, than payroll) of operating and maintaining vehicles 
including cost of fuel, lubricants, repairs, etc. 

Line g — Include rental expense of offices, terminals, and other facilities. If 
the firm owns its own facilities do not include equivalent space rental on this 
line. 

Line h — Report all operating expenses not reported elsewhere on this form, 
but exclude interest on loans or other indebtedness. Include payments to 
other firms for rental of vehicles or other equipment; advertising, accounting, 
legal, communications, and other services; insurance and safety, except 
for the account of employees; station expenses and shipping, storage, and 
other handling costs incidental to the delivery of goods to your customers. 
Also include amounts set aside for bad debt losses, the amount not compen- 
sated for by insurance from accidental loss or damage to capital, and losses 
by theft (not reflected in merchandise inventory account). 


a. Employer contributions to 

unemployment insurance, pension, 
welfare and other insurance plans 


Dollars 


Cents 


Key 




XX 


31 


b. Taxes and licenses fees 

(excluding income or payroll taxes) 




XX 


3-2 


c. Depreciation 




XX 


3-3 


d. Purchases of all types of office 
supplies, stationery, and postage 




XX 


34 


e. Payments for electricity, heating 
fuel, and water 




XX 


3-5 


f. Cost of operating and 
maintaining vehicles 




XX 


3-6 


g. Office, other space rental 




XX 


3-7 


h. Other operating expenses not 
reported elsewhere (excluding 
interest on loans) 




XX 


3-8 


i. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through h) 




XX 


3-9* 


1 1 . What percent of your firm's expenses and payroll (line 9a plus line lOii 
are the result of nonmotor carrier operations? 


Percent 


Key 


9c 


4 1 


12. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (excluding land) IN 1967 


Capital expenditures refer to all costs actually incurred during 1967 (whether 
on contract or by your own forces) which are chargeable to the fixed assets 
accounts of this firm and which are of the type for which depreciation accounts 
are normally maintained. 

Include expenditures for new and used structures, fixtures, and equipment. 
including those under construction at the end of 1967; and expenditures for 
additions, major alterations, capitalized repairs, and improvements to existing 
facilities. Also, include expenditures made by your firm for structures which, 
on completion, were or are to be sold or leased by your firm. 

Do not include expenditures for land; cost of maintenance, repairs, supplies, 
or other items chargeable as current operating expenses. Exclude capital 
expenditures made by owners of property rented or leased to you. 

If. during 1967. you did not make any expenditures of the kinds described 
above, enter "0" on line d. 


a. New structures and related facilities 
(Include business structures, ware- 
houses, offices, garages, etc.) and 
establishment sites (roads, fences, 
parking lots, etc.) 


Dollars 


Cents 


Key 




XX 


4-2 


b. New machinery and equipment 

(1) Motor vehicles llnclude automobiles, 
trucks, truck tractors, trailers, 
semitrailers, and buses. Do not 
deduct the value of trade-ins.) 




XX 


4-3 


(2) All other machinery (Include fork 
lifts, hand trucks, conveyors, office 
furniture, fixtures and equipment.) 




XX 


4-4 


c. Used structures, machinery and equip- 
ment (acquired from others and 
subject to capital depreciation) 
(1) Motor vehicles (as described on 
line 12b(l) above) 




XX 


4-5 


(2) All other used structures, 
machinery, and equipment 




XX 


4-6 


d. TOTAL capital expenditures 
(Sum of lines a, b, and c) 




XX 


4-7 


13. GROSS BOOK VALUE OF FIXED ASSETS AS OF END OF 1967 


Line a — Report the original cost of fixed assets on the books of this firm, such 
as buildings, structures, machinery, for which depreciation reserves are main- 
tained. The value of assets reported in line a should include all the types of 
items for which capital expenditures are reported in 12a. 

Line b — Include all types of items for which capital expenditures are reported 
in 12b. 

Used assets purchased during the year should be included at their market 
value rather than original book value. 

1 


a. Buildings and other structures 
(exclude land) as described in 
item 12a 


Dollars 


Cents 


Key 




XX 


4-8 


b. Machinery and equipment 

(1) Motor vehicles (as described 
in item 12b(l» 




XX 


4-9 


(2) All other machinery and equipment 
(Include office, warehouse and 
terminal equipment, as described 
in item 12b(2).l 




XX 


4-10 


c. TOTAL value of fixed assets 
(Sum of lines a and b) 




XX 


4-11* 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



151 



FORM CB-41 -Con. 



14. OPERATING STATISTICS 1 967— Include data for owned and leased buses operated by your firm. 


Line d — The figure reported for passenger miles should be the total number of miles traveled by all passengers carried in regular-route intercity serv- 
ice. If the actual total is not readily available, an estimate may be made by multiplying the total number of passengers carried times the average dis- 
tance traveled (one way) by passengers. 




1 8 


8-1 


82 


8-3 


84 


8-5 


86 


8-7* 


Item 




Code 


Intercity 
regular 
route 
service 

ID 


Local 
regular 

route 
service 

(2) 


Charter 
and 

special 

(3) 


School 
(4) 


Sightseeing 
(5) 


Airport 
(6) 


a. Bus miles operated 


101 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 














b. Passenger revenues 

iSum of columns 1 through 6 
should be the same as item 8a.) 


102 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 














c. Number of passengers carried 


103 


Number 


Number 














d. Passenger miles 


104 














15. REVENUE PASSENGER EQUIPMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1967 

Show the number of owned and leased buses on hand as of December 31. 1967, 
classified according to the seating capacity indicated. 




1 8 


8-1 


82 8-3 8-4 8-5 


8-6 8-7 8-8 8-9 8-10* 






Code 


Registration status of buses 


Type of fuel used 


Capacity 


Number registered in — 


Total 
number of 
buses (Col. 
1, 2. and 3) 

(4) 


Number of buses using — 
(Total of columns (5H9) must equal column (4)) 


1 State 
(1) 


2 States 
(2) 


More 

than 

2 States 

(3) 


Gasoline 

(5) 


Diesel 
(6) 


LP gas 

(7) 


Electricity 

(8) 


Other fuel 
(9) 


a. 7 or fewer passengers 


105 




















b. 8-18 passengers 


106 




















c. 19-28 passengers 


107 




















d. 29-35 passengers 


108 




















e. 36-41 passengers 


109 




















f. 42 or more passengers 


110 




















g. TOTAL buses 
iSum of lines s 




111 




















i through f) 


This space may be used for any explanation that may be helpful in understanding your report. 


16. 
CERTIFICATION 


Name of person to contact regarding this report 


Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 


Telephone No. 


Area code 


Number 


Extension 


This report is substantiallv accurate and covers the period from to 


Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 



FORM CB-41 



152 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67015 



K»« C1-42A 

(4201) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU Of THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



PUBLIC WAREHOUSING 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 
Please eumplele and return this form in the envelope provided. 

If you operated more than one establishment (location! under the same 

Employer Identification Number in 1967. entries on this report should 

be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1. enter the 

location of your main establishment and in item 14 provide iniormation 

separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 

Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 9411 was 

changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 

in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 

Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or. if records are 

maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cuver the fiscal year 

which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville. Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE- Response to this inquiry i> required by law (Title 13 t .S. Code). By the same 
law. your report hi (lie Census Bureau is confidential. It may be >cen only by sworn (>n>u> 
employees and may lie u.-cd only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your hle> arc immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Numberjgk 



CB-42A (4201) 



Employer 
Identification No., 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



D Yes 



□ No (If "No." enter trade 
name above the label.) 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. □ The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. □ The mail address nl your establishment [including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. □ Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2, complete d and e below.) 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Numb. 



nd sir 



City, villa- 



other plar 



ZIP 



i NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give nan 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



e. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 □ Yes 2 □ No 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (Ell Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 941? 



O Ye 



□ No (If "No." enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 D Partnership 

□ Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 | 

a. Was this establishment in business 

at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 2 D No 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations. 

answer "Yes." unless the eslablishment was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did 

you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3| 



5. Not-applicable to this form 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



153 



FORM CB-42A-Con. 



6. STORAGE AND WAREHOUSE REVENUE IN 1967 



Report all revenue in 1967. after deductions of returns, allowances, and dis- 
counts. It' you warehouse household [Kinds, report the following: 

Line a(l)-Trueking revenue (including local cartage). 

Line a(2)-Olher revenue (storage, labor, packing and crating, commissions 
received) from warehousing "f household goods. 

Line b — Revenue (storage, handling, and accessorial services) from ware- 
housing of genera) merchandise. Report storage handling, cartage; and 
leasing revenue separately in (1). (2), (3). and (4). 

Line c — Public refrigerated warehouse revenue, including handling, freezing, 
storing, and revenue from any space leased to others on a landlord-to-tenant 
basis. 

Line r(l) — Revenue from space, if any. included under item 10c as leased 
on landlord-to-tenant basis. 

Line d-Food locker revenue, including receipts from food preparation. 

Line e — Sales of merchandise. If goods are sold on a commission or broker- 
age basis, report total sales. Do not limit this amount to commissions re- 
ceived. 

Line f— Other operating revenue not included on lines a through e. including 
revenue from services as compressing, baling, etc. 



i. Household goods revenue 
( 1 ) Trucking revenue 



(2) Other household goods revenu 



(3) Total household goods revenue 

(Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



h. General merchandise revenue 
(1) Storage revenue 



(21 Handling charges 



l3) Cartage revenue 



(4) Leasing and other genera! 
merchandise revenue 



(5) Total of general merchandise 
revenue 

(Sum of lines (1) through (4)) 



c. Refrigerated warehousing revenue 

(1) Revenue from leasing 
refrigerated space 



(2) Revenue from storage, freezing, 
handling, etc. 



13) Total refrigerated warehouse 
revenue 

(Sum uf lines (1) and (2)) 



d. rood locker i 



Sales of merchandise (including 
sales and excise taxes) 



f. Other operating revenue (Specify) 



g. TOTAL REVENUE UN 1967- 
(Sum of lines a(3), b(5), c(3), 
and d through f) 



XX 



XX 



XX 



Key 



1-6 



X-4* 



7. PAYROLL 

Line a — Report total wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, fees, and other 
remuneration paid to your employees during 1967, hefore deductions such 
as employees' Social Security contributions; withholding taxes, group insur- 
ance premiums, union dues, and savings bonds. INCLUDE such items as 
dismissal pay, vacation and sick leave pay, the cash equivalent of payment in 
kind (such as goods, lodging, food, and clothing). INCLUDE salaries of 
officers, if a corporation. DO NOT include compensation or payments to. 
or withdrawals by, proprietors or partners of an unincorporated business. 



8. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this hox D if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identi- 
fication Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

h. Mark this hox D if this business own or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies lif known). 



Name of company 



Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Key 



Mailing address (Number, street, city. State. 
ZIP code) 



9. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS 



Household goods warehousing and storage — not engaged in local 

trucking — Engaged in the storage of furniture and household goods, even 
though some general merchandise or specialized commodities may also be 
stored: but not engaged in trucking. 

Local trucking and storage, including household goods — Trucking 
and storage services in a single municipality, contiguous municipality, or a 
municipality and its suburban areas. Warehousing and storage of household 
goods when not combined with trucking should be classified above, code 
4224101 

General warehousing and storage — Storage of general merchandise, even 
though some household goods or specialized commodities may also be stored. 
General merchandise is defined as materials or goods of many varieties which 
are packaged (in boxes, cartons, crates, bags, barrels, kegs, etc.) or are readily 
handled and do not require refrigeration, controlled humidities, or other special 
facilities. 

Refrigerated warehousing., except food lockers — Storage of perishable 
goods at artificially low temperatures, but not primarily a food locker plant. 

Food lockers, with or without food preparation facilities — Renting 

locker space for the storage of food products for individual households — with 
or without services for processing, preparing, or packaging such food for 
storage. 

Grain warehousing and storage — Storage of grain for others. 
Special warehousing and storage — Storage of special products not else- 
where classified such as automobiles (dead storage only), furs (for the trade!, 
textiles, whiskey, goods in bond, and goods at foreign trade zones. 

Other type of business — Describe the business if this establishment is not 
primarily engaged in warehousing and storage for others. 



Mark the ONE item that best describes the principal type 
of public warehouse or facility covered by this report. 

4224101 Household goods warehousing and storage — 

not engaged in local trucking 

.Local trucking and storage, including housch 



±1± 



4214102 
4225009 _ 

4222006 . 
4223004 . 
4221107. 
4221206 _ 
4221305. 
4221404. 

4226007 . 

9000001 . 
9000001 _ 



Id goods 

.General warehousing and storage 
.Field warehousing 

.Refrigerated warehousing, except food lockers 
.Food lockers, with or without food preparation facilities 
.Cotton warehousing— with compress 
.Cotton warehousing — without compress 
_ Grain warehousing and storage (See item lOe) 

.Other farm products warehousing and storage 
(tobacco, potatoes, etc.) 

_ Special warehousing and storage, not elsewhere classi- 
fied (Specify)_ 

.Freight trucking terminal 

_ Household goods warehousing and storage 
AND trucking beyond local area 

. Cotton gin 

.Other type of business (Specify) 



154 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORMCB-42A-Con. 



10. WAREHOUSE AND STORAGE SPACE, DECEMBER 31, 1967 



Data in this item should include all storage facilities 
covered in this report. 

Item a — Met occupiable warehouse floor space — 

Keport net occupiable (occupied plus unoccupied) 
under-roof floor space as of December 31, 1967. 
Report inside measurements excluding interior walls, 
permanent aisles, elevator shafts, staircases, offices, 
receiving and shipping platforms or other areas in 
which goods are not usuall) piled. For multiple-story 
buildings, include such space on all floors. 

Do not report here refrigerated storage space, frozen 
food locker space, bin space, or space for storing bulk 
liquids. See below for these items. 

Item b — Frozen food locker space — Include data 
on number of lockers installed and freezer space 
available for bulk storage at food locker plants. 

Line (I)— Report number of individual lockers having 
storage space of less than 25 cubic feet each, that 
were installed as of December 31, 1967. 

Line (2)— Report in cubic feet the available freezer 
space in food locker plants not being utilized for indi- 
vidual lockers, and available (whether or not occupied) 
for bulk storage. Do not report here freezer space in 
facilities other than food locker plants. 

Item c— Refrigerated net piling space — Net 

piling space is space for storing commodities — inside 
space measured from wall to wall and from floor to 
ceiling, less space for ventilation (outside the piling), 
coils, aisles, posts, sprinklers, etc. Report here the 
refrigerated (net piling) space. 50° Fahrenheit or below. 
Do not report frozen food locker space here. 

Lines c(l), (2), and (3)— Include here any space 
leased to others and report revenue therefrom under 
item 6c(l). 



a. Net occupiable public floor space, 
December 31. 1967 
(1) Assigned to household goods 



(2) Assigned to general merchandise 



(3) Other net occupiable space 



(4) Total public storage space 

(Sum of lines (1) through (3)) 



6-1 



64 



pace in square feet 



assigned to public storage, 
Dec. 31. 1967 



TOTAL 

space for 

public 

storage 



In single- 
story 
buildings 



b. Frozen food locker space, December 31, 1967 

(1) Lockers installed — individual lockers having storage 
capacity of less than 25 cubic feet each 



(2) Bulk storage space in locker plants — freezer spac 
available for bulk storage 



c. Refrigerated net piling space 50° 
Fahrenheit or below, occupied or 
unoccupied, assigned to public 
storage. December 31, 1967 

(1) Freezer space 



(2) Other refrigerated space 



(3) Total refrigerated piling space 

(Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



Code 



62 



In multiple- 
story 
buildings 



Space 
reserved for 
own use or 
leased on 
landlord-to- 
tenant basis 



Cubic feet 



6-3* 



Cubic feet, Dec. 31. 1967 



Space assigned to 
public storage 



d. Total bulk liquid (tank) storage space 
(shell or water capacity) 



e. Total bin space for storing loose grains, 
feed, etc. (rated capacity) 



Space reserved for 

own use or leased on 

landlord-to-tenanl 

basis 



Key 



5-4Jr 



5-5 



11. FORKLIFT, CLAMPLIFT TRUCKS, MID-DECEMBER 1967 

Report the number of motorized trucks, including any stand-by or in repair, used in the 
horizontal movement or in vertical lifting of merchandise. 



Number 



12. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT, 1967 



Capital expenditures refer to all costs incurred during 1967 which are charge- 
able to fixed asset accounts of this establishment and which are of the type for 
which depreciation accounts are ordinarily maintained. Do not include 
maintenance and repair costs charged to current operating expenses. 

Include such expenditures as purchase, erection or enlargement of tanks, 
elevators, or other structures; permanent installation such as elevators, 
shafts, air conditioning, refrigeration; ramps or stairways; or remodeling 
garages, platforms, and parking areas; and purchases for use in the business 



of such new items as machines and equipment, cars and trucks, materials 
handling equipment, etc. Exclude expenditures for used structures, plants, 
machinery, equipment, etc.. acquired from others; but include any remodeling, 
rebuilding, etc.. costs after purchase. 



Total capital expenditures in 1967 for new 
construction, new machinery, and new equip-- 
menl (include major alterations and capitalized 
repairs; exclude land) 



Dollars 



Key 



13. TYPE OF PRODUCT WAREHOUSED OR STORED— Mark the ONE that accounted for the principal portion of your storage revenue in 1967. 



Refrigerated Products 

Complete this section if you marked "Refrigerated Warehousing" in item 9 



61 Apples 

62 Dairy products, poultry, eggs 

63 Fresh fruits, vegetables 

64 Frozen fruits, vegetables 



.Fish 

-Other refrigerated products 
(Specify) 



65. 



-Meats and meat products, 
fresh and frozen 



Bulk Liquid Products 

Complete this section if you are primarily engaged in 
public storage of bulk liquid products 

71 Petroleum products 

72 Chemicals 

79 Other bulk liquid products (Specify) 



" | S-9' 



14. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATION 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your 
main selling location and facilities other than selling establishments 

(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 D Yes 



2 □ No 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State, ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Use 
Only 



Total revenue 



Dollars iCents 



Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 



Public 

warehouse 

floor space 

Dec. 31, 1967 

(square feet) 



XX 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Should be equal to lines 6g and 10a(4)) 



15. 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



{"code 



Number 



Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from . 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



FORM CB-42A 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



155 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



I,. 



Approved: Budgcl Bureau N„ 1I-S67077 



k»m CB-47 

(4700) 



US DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BURCAU OF IHf CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



TRAVEL AGENCIES 



Pleas. 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 
in the 



miplete and return this form in the envelope provided. 

If you operated more than one establishment (location) under the same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967, entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1, enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 11 provide information 
separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 
This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal 
year which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not avaUable, enter your best estimates. 
If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE Responsr tn 

law, your report to the 

' ees and may lit 
d in your files i 



plo 



tins inquiry i* rcuuir.-d by law (Title 1,1 I S C.de). By the lame 
Census Rurrau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn * !ensus 
used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides ilmt copies 

n- in.niun.' from It-gul |>r.i.-.-»». 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
pleaie refer to this Census File Number ^Sk 



CB-47 (4700) 



Employer 
Identification N 



2 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 



a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
firm is known to the public? 

□ Yes □ No (If "No." enter trade 

name above the label.) 



b. Is the address shown the actual physical location 
of the main office of this firm? 



D Yes 



□ No 



If "No." enter below the number, city. State, 
and ZIP code of this firm's main office. 



Number and street 



City, village, or other place 



c. Does this agencv have an appointment 

to any conference? 1 D Yes 2 D No 



d. If "Yes," mark below the conference(s) 
with which this agency has an appointment 

1 D IATA 4 D TPPSC 

2 □ ATC 

3 D RTPA 



5 □ TAPSC 

6 □ Other(s) (Specify). 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this firm on your latest 1967 Employer's 
Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



D Yes D No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 Q Partnership 

□ Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 



Was this firm in business 
at the end of 1967? 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 

(NOTE: For firms which were inactive during 
December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 
answer "Yes," unless the firm was not owned 
at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this firm? 



Months 



X-3{ 



5. DOLLAR VOLUME OF TRAVEL COMMISSIONS, ETC. AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Line a(l) — Include commissions and other payment received from the sale 

of cruises, package-tours, packages (when transportation is not included), 

point-to-point transportation, lodging, car rental, and other travel services. 

(Tour operators should include the difference between operational costs and 

selling price of tours.) 

Line a(2) — Include receipts from nontravel services (such as insurance, 

bookkeeping, commissions from real estate transactions, etc.) and sales of 

merchandise. 

Do not include in line a(l) or (2) — 

• Gross receipts from the rental or sale of real estate or income from invest- 
ments. 

• The amount of sale which is paid to or retained by the hotel, carrier, etc., 
after your commission is paid. 

• Commissions paid to other travel agents. 

Line b— Include all salaries, wages, commissions, bonuses, vacation allow- 
ances, and the value of payments in kind, such as goods, lodging, food and 
clothing. Include reported tips, gratuities, etc.. received by your employees 
from others. Do not include payments to (or withdrawals by) owners or 
partners of unincorporated businesses. 



Commissions and receipts during 
1967 

ll) Commissions and other payments 
received from hotels, carriers, and 
other travel agents (tour operation) 
(Exclude commissions paid to other 
travel agents.) 



(2) Other receipts including 
sales of merchandise 



(3) TOTAL (Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



b. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Key 



6. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box D if this firm is owned or controlled by another 

company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 



Mailing addrt-s* (Number, street, city. State. ZIP code) 



b. Mark this box D if this firm owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



EI No. (9 digits) 



Name of company 



7. KIND OF BUSINESS 



If this is a travel agency, mark the item below. If the principal activity 
is other than that of a travel agency, mark "Other" and describe. 

4721007 D Travel agency 

D Other— Specify 



156 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-47-Con. 



8 GROSS SALES IN 1967 — Total billings to customers, including taxes and your 

commissions. Do not include sales made by other agents. 



Dollar volume of sales of: 

a. Tickets for steamship travel 
(1) Point-to-point 



(2) Cruises 



b. Tickets for domestic air travel 



c. Tickets for international air travel 



d. Tickets for railroad travel 



Lodging facilities 



f. Package-tours and packages, less transportation (estimates are acceptable) 
(Tour operators should NOT include sales made through other travel agents.) 



g. Other travel services (include car hire, etc.) 



Dollars 



9. EXPENSES (other than payroll) DURING 1967 



Line a — Employer contributions under the Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act (FICA); the Federal Unemployment Tax Act; any payments or allocations 
to other employee benefits such as State Temporary Disability and Workmen's 
Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, Health and Welfare, savings 
and deferred profits plans; and premiums for life, disability, sickness and 
medical insurance. 

Line b — Include all non-payroll costs for: attendance at courses or seminars; 
meetings of professional societies; and inspection visits by agency staff mem- 
bers, including proprietors and partners. Include expenses such as cost of 
travel, lodging, books, as well as charges for registration, admission, or tuition. 

Line c— Total taxes, such as license fees, real estate and real property taxes, 
etc. payable during 1967. Do not include Federal or State taxes on payroll 
or taxable i 



Line d — Report the amount as on your books, of depreciation in 1967 of 
buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, and other equipment. 

Line f— Include only direct payments for electricity, heating fuel and water. 

Line g — If the agency owns its own office space do not include equivalent 
office rent expense on this line. 

Line h — Nonpayroll expenses not reported elsewhere on this form, except 
interest on loans or other indebtedness. Include payments to other firms 
for rental of vehicles or other equipment, advertising, accounting, communica- 
tions or other services; insurance, except for the account of employees. Also 
include amounts set aside for bad debt losses, the amount not compensated 
for by insurance from accidental loss, damage to capital, and losses by theft. 



10. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (excluding land) IN 1967 

Capital expenditures refer to all costs actually incurred during 1967 which 
are chargeable to the fixed assets accounts of this firm, and are of the type 
for which depreciation accounts are normally maintained. These include 
expenditures during 1967 for buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, etc. 
(Do not deduct the value of trade-ins.) 



a. Employer contributions to unemployment 
insurance. FICA, pension, welfare, and 
other insurance plans 



b. Expenses incurred for professional 
advancement of staff 



c. Taxes and licenses fees, excluding 
income or payroll taxes 



d. Depreciation 



e. Purchase of all types of supplies, 
stationery and postage 



f. Payments for electricity, heating fuel 
and water 



g. Office, other space rent 



h. Other nonpayroll expenses not reported 
elsewhere (excluding interest on loans) 



i. TOTAL 

(Sum of lines a through hi- 



Total capital expenditures in 1967 for 
structures and related facilities, equip- 
ment, and other depreciable assets 



Dollars 



II. YOUR OFFICE LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes." is marked above, separately list below each location, including your main 
location, and including facilities other than travel agency establishments (such 

as warehouses, central administrative offices, accounting facilities, etc.) 



1 D Yes 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State, ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number - 
(Sales total should equal the entry in item 5a(3)) 



Sales, 
commissions, 
or receipts 



I XX 



XX 



i xx 



! Cents 



; XX 



I XX 



XX 



XX 



Cents 



I XX 2-10 



2 D No 



Key 



4-1 



Key 



2-3 
24 
2-5 

2-6 



2 7 

2-8 
2-9 
Key 



Number of 
paid employees 
(Pay period 
including 
March 12) 



This space may be used for any explanations which may be helpful in understanding your report. 




12. 



CERTIFICATION 



FORM CB-47 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



Area code Number Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from . 



Signature of authorized person 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



157 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



K.i 



\p|.i,)Mil: Hud»cl Bureau No. U S67015 



NOTICE— Response to this inquiry is required by 1 

law. your report to the Census Bureau is confidential 

employees and may be used only for statistieal purposes. The law also provides that eopies 

retained in your hies are immune from lejial process. 



FORM CB-50L 
(5012) 



US DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF IHF CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



PETROLEUM BUSINESS, BULK STATIONS, TERMINALS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



1'lease complete and return this fo 



in iht 



elope provided. 



If you operated more than one establishment [location) under the same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967. entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1, enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 9 provide information 
separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 
If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



(Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
It may be seen only by sworn Census 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number ^ 



CB-50L(5012) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Enter the name by which you identify the establishment 



Your answers to the other inquiries of this form should relate to the actual 
physical location of this establishment which may be different from the 
mailing address. 



Number and street 



County 



City, village, or other place 



c. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label? 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



d. Latitude and longitude 
of the plant location 
tin degrees and minutes 



Degrees Minut 



Longitude 



Minutes 



2. EMPLOYEE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes D Nti (If "No." enter the 

currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual |>roprietor 

2 D Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 
8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 
" D Other (Specify) 



TTT 



Additional plant location information 



(1) If plant 
is in a 
city 



(2) If plant 
is not in 
a citv 



(a) Nearest intersecting or cross street 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this establishment in business 
at the end of 1967? 



1 D Yes 



2 n No 



(a) Road or railroad adjacent to the plant 



(b) Distance and direction from city 

Distance (lOlhs of mi.) {Direction |Name of city 

I 



(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive during 
December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 
answer "Yes." unless the establishment was not owned 
at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



5. TOTAL SALES IN 1967 {after deducting returns and allowances) 



Line a — Report here total sales'of all products and other operating receipts 
during 1967. Include excise and sales taxes which are also to be reported 
separately in item 5b. Also include receipts from services rendered cus- 
tomers. Exclude stock transfers, if any. to bulk plants of your own company, 
but include at wholesale prices sales or transfers to filling stations of your 
company. 

Commission agents — Agent operating a facility for an oil company on a 
commission basis should report here only sales on your own account (goods 
purchased and resold by you). 



Line b — Enter here total amount of gasoline, oil. and other excise or sales 
taxes (local. State, and Federal) collected from customers and paid directly 
by you to any Government taxing agency. The amount reported here should 
also be included in item 5a. 

Line c — Mark "Yes" if drive-in facilities are provided the public and you 
customarily service automobiles, otherwise mark "No." 



TOTAL SALES and other 

operating receipts 

(Include excise and sales taxes) 



b. Total gasoline and other sales or 
excise taxes paid directly by you 
to taxing authorities 
(Also include in item 5a above) 



Docs this establishment do a 
retail service station business. 



(1) If "Yes." approximately what 
percent of your sales in 5a abo 
represented retail business? 



d. Approximately what percent, if any, 
of sales (item 5a above) was 
accounted for by — 

(1) Sales of LP gas for resale? 



(2) Deliveries of fuel oil 
direct to homes? 



(3) Deliveries across State lines? 



1 D Yes 



2 □ No 



Code 



Key 



1-2 

1-3 ! 



158 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-50L-Con. 



6. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box D if this business is owned or controlled by another com- 
pany and enters the name, mailing address, and Employer Identification 
Number of owning or controlling company lif known). 



b. Mark this box D if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identi^ - - 
tion Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 digits) 



PAYROLL DURING 1967 

Report total wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, fees, and other remunera 
tion paid to your employees during 1967, before deductions such as employees 
Social Security contributions, withholding taxes, group insurance premiums 
union dues, and savings bonds. INCLUDE such items as dismissal pay, vaca 
tion and sick leave pay, the cash equivalent of payment in kind (such as goods 
lodging, food, and clothing). INCLUDE salaries of officers, if a corporation 
DO NOT include compensation or payments to, or withdrawals by. proprietors 
or partners of an unincorporated business. 



Total ANNUAL payroll during 1967 
before deduct ions 



Dollars 



Cents 



Key 



INVENTORIES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

Line a— Report inventories at cost value rather than at sales price. Include 
goods owned by you and consigned to others, but not goods of others held by 
you. Report inventories as of date specified, or nearest inventory date. 

Commission agents — Report here only inventories owned by you. Do not 
include inventories owned by companies for whom you sell on a commission 
basis. 



a. Merchandise inventories, at cost 
(1) December 31, 1967 



(2) December 31. 1966.. 



Dollars 



Cents 



i XX 



Key 



2XXX 

2-5 



2-6* 



9. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one locatic 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967?... 

b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including 
main idling location and facilities other than selling establishments 
(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 □ Yes 



2 D No 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State. ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Sales or receipts 



Cents 



Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 



XX 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Sales total should equal the entry in item 5a) 



XX 



10. STORAGE CAPACITY AND SALES 



Storage capacity (Gallons)— Report total shell or water capacity by product. 
Include relay (or lock-up points) with bulk plants of which they are a part. 

Sales 1967 (Gallons) — Report gallons sales to retailers, peddlers, users and 
consumers. Include any sales or transfers to your own gasoline service 
stations. Exclude all sales and transfers t" other bulk stations, regardless 
of ownership. 

Commission agents — Report storage capacity, if any, in which you store 
bulk petroleum products which you sell on your own account — not capacity 
of the oil company referred to in item lie. Report only sales made on your 
own account. 

Lines a and b — Include finished grades of aviation and motor gasoline as well 
as finished components in the gasoline range which will be blended into 
finished gasoline. 

Line c — Include paint thinners, cleaner's naphtha and solvents. 

Line d- Include aviation tnrMne engine fuels for military and/or commercial 

use. 

Line e— Include range oil. 

Line f- Include A.S.T.M. grades 1, 2, and 4 and distillate type diesel fuel oils. 

Line g— Include A.S.T.M. grade 5, heavy diesel. Navy special and Bunker 
C fuel oils. 

Line h — Include LP and LR gases. 



LA 



Product 



a. Aviation gasoline 



b. Motor gasoline 



c. Special naphthas 



d. Jet fuels (naphtha 
or kerosene type) 



e. Kerosene 



f. Distillate fuel oils 



g. Residual fuel oils 



h. Liquefied petroleum gases 



6-1 



Cod( 



6-2 



Storage capacity 
Dec. 31, 1967 

including 

underground 

(Gallons) 



6-3* 



Sales 

1967 

(Gallons) 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



159 



FORMCB-50L-Con. 



11. KIND OF BUSINESS 



GASOLINE, KEROSENE, DISTILLATE OR RESIDUAL 

Bulk terminal (with storage capacity) — Mark this item if the facility 
is primarily engaged in the distribution of gasoline, kerosene, distillate or 
residual fuel oils and — 

(a) has total bulk storage capacity of 2,100,000 gallons or more, or 

(b) has less capacity but receives its principal products by tanker, 
barge or pipeline. 

Automatic take-off terminal — Mark this item if this facility has no 
bulk liquid storage capacity, but transports load direct from pipeline. 

Bulk station — Mark this item if the facility is primarily engaged in the 
distribution of gasoline, kerosene, distillate or residual fuel oils and — 

(a) has total storage capacity of less than 2,100,000 gallons; and 

(b> does not receive its products by tanker, barge or pipeline. 

Truck jobber (no storage tanks) — Mark this item if you have no 
stationary bulk petroleum storage tanks and are primarily engaged in 
buying on your own account, and selling petroleum products from trucks. 

Other type of petroleum products distributor — Mark this item if 
operating as a petroleum products distributor not covered above, and 
enter a description of your business. For example: exporter, importer, 
packaged goods jobber, etc. 

LIQUEFIED GAS (PETROLEUM) 

Wholesale bulk plant or terminal — Mark this item if the facility is 
primarily engaged in the distribution of bulk liquefied petroleum gases. 

Wholesale bottled gas distributor— Mark this item if the facility is 
primarily engaged in the wholesale distribution of bottled liquefied 
petroleum gases. 

OTHER KIND OF BUSINESS -If none of the other types of operation 
applies, mark this item and describe briefly your method of operation. 



a. Mark the item describing the type of activity or type of operation 
covered on this report. 



K.» 



Gasoline, Kerosene, Distillate, or Residual 

SQQ'21 1 9 Bulk terminal (with storage capacity) 

5092135 Automatic take-off terminal 

5092119 Bulk station 

5092200 Truck jobber (no storage tanks) 

5092200 Other type of petroleum products distributor (Specify) 



5092127. 
5092200 . 



Liquefied Gas (Petroleum) 

_ Wholesale bulk plant or terminal 
-Wholesale cylinder or bottled gas distributor 

Other Kind of Business 

_ Broker (petroleum, petroleum products) 

_ Other (Specify) 



b. To owner of bulk plant 

Is this plant operated for you 

by a commissioned agent? 1 Q Yes 2 D No 



c. To operator of bulk plant, if different from owner 

Do you operate this plant on a 

commission basis for an oil company? 1 Q Yes 2 D No 

If "Yes." enter name of company for whom you sell 



d. In case of power failure, can delivery 
equipment be loaded by gravity? 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



?. Do you have facilities for blending light 
heating oils with residual fuel oils? 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



f. Method of receiving bulk liquid products 
at this plant — mark appropriate box 
in each column. 



(1) Tank truck.. 

(2) Tank car.... 

(3) Pipeline 

(4) Ba:*<- 

(5) Tanker 



Primary 
method 



Alternate 
method 
(If any) 



Key 



12. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT, 1967 



Capital expenditures refer to all costs incurred during 1967 which are charge- 
able to fixed asset accounts of this establishment and which are r>f the type 
for which depreciation accounts are ordinarily maintained. Do not include 
maintenance and repair costs charged to current operating expenses. Com- 
mission agents should report any new equipment purchased by them. 

Include such expenditures as purchase, erection or enlargement of tanks, 
elevators, or other structures; permanent installation such as elevators, shafts, 
air conditioning, refrigeration; ramps or stairways; or remodeling garages, 
platforms, and parking areas; and purchases for use in the business of such 



new items as machines and equipment, cars and trucks, materials handling 
equipment, etc. Exclude expenditures for used structures, plants, ma- 
chinery, equipment, etc., acquired from others; but include any remodeling, 
rebuilding, etc., costs after purchase. 



Total capital expenditures in 1967 for new 
construction, new machinery, and new equip- 
ment (include major alterations and capitalized 
repairs; exclude land) 



Key 



PLEASE SIGN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS 

Agencies responsible for directing the distribution of petroleum products in a national emergency require data on petroleum bulk plants and terminals 
which (1) may be collected in a survey substantially duplicating this Census survey, or which (2) may be made available to them without the need for 
conducting a separate survey, providing permission is given for the release of information being reported in this survey. Accordingly, the Bureau of the 
Census has been requested by the Office of Oil and Gas, U.S. Department of Interior, to ask that you sign ONE of the following statements. 



A. The Bureau of the Census is authorized to release the information on this 
form (except for all dollar figures and for data on gallonage sales figures) to 
ihe Office of Oil and Gas of the U.S. Department of Interior for its use only in 
connection with its delegated responsibilities for petroleum storage and 
distribution in the event of a national emergency. That office may transfer 
such data only to other Federal and Slate agencies having like responsibilities 
and these agencies shall be prohibited from using the information for other 
than national defense purposes. 



B. The Bureau of the Census is not authorized to release information on this 
form to the Office of Oil and Gas of the U.S. Department of Interior for its use 
in connection with its delegated responsibility for petroleum storage and 
distribution in the event of a national emergency. 



ll) Signature and title of authorized person 



(2) Signature and title of authorized person 



13. PLANT MANAGER (Or official in charge) 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone (Area code, number, ext.) 



CERTIFICATION 



FORM CB-50L 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



Area code Number Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period fron 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



160 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67015 



fobmCB-51A-1 

(5101) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

MANUFACTURERS' SALES BRANCHES AND SALES OFFICES 
FOOD, TOBACCO, AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Please complete and return this form in the envelope provided. 

A separate report is required on this form for each sales branch and 
sales office operated during 1967. Each sales office without stock 
should be reported separately as well as each sales branch carrying 
stocks of merchandise from which deliveries are made to customers. 
Sales branches and sales offices located at plants or administrative 
offices should be reported on this form where separate records are 
available, or if substantially accurate reports can be prepared. Em- 
ployment, payroll, inventories, and operating expenses reported here 
should not be included in manufacturer's plant reports (MC series). 
Sales, however, will to some extent duplicate shipments on your plant 
reports. 

This report should cover only the establishment identified in the 
address block. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are main- 
tained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by 
the due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, JefTersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number A 



CB-51A-1 (5101) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this establish- 
ment is known to the public? 



D Yes 



D No (If "No," enter trade 
name above the label.} 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. D The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. □ The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. D Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are not shown 
in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you marked box 2, complete 
d and e below.) 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 



City, village, or other place 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



D Yes D No (If "No," enter the 

currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY I 

OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



X-l 



State 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 



a. Was this establishment in business 
at the end of 1967? 



Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 D Yes 2 D No 



1 D Yes 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive during 
December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 
answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 
at the end of the year.) 



2 D No 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3 



5. TOTAL SALES IN 1967 



Line a — Total net sales after deducting returns, allowances, and discounts, 
but include excise taxes and sales taxes. Include all company sales credited 
to the sales branch or sales office even though billings may be made from a 
centra! or district office and shipments made from a plant or central warehouse. 
Also include, at wholesale prices, sales or transfers to any retail stores you 
may own. Include any receipts from services rendered customers, but do 
not include any receipts derived from sources other than customers. 



Line b — Approximate percentage of sales, (item 5a), if any, accounted for by 
goods produced by your company, your parent company or companies cor- 
porately affiliated with your company. 

Line c — Approximate percentage of 1967 sales (item 5a), if any, made by this 
establishment to household consumers, individual users, and farmers. 



a. TOTAL SALES and other operating 
receipts 



b. Products produced by this or other 
establishments of your company 



To household consumers, individual 
users, and farmers 



Dollars 



Cents 



Percentage 



Key 



X-4 
XXX 



1-1* 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



161 



FORM CB-51A-1 -Con. 



6. PAYROLL AND EMPLOYMENT 


Line »— Report tola) rfages, s&larifeo, buiiUn.^, conimUaluns, fees, ami uthei 
remuneration paid to your employees during 1967, before deductions such 
as employees' Social Security contributions, withholding taxes, group insur- 
ance premiums, union dues, and savings bonds. INCLUDE such items as 
dismissal pay, vacation and sick leave pay, the cash equivalent of payment in 
kind (such as goods, lodging, food, and clothing). INCLUDE salaries of 
officers, if a corporation. DO NOT include compensation or payments to, 
or withdrawals by, proprietors or partners of an unincorporated business. 

Line b— Report all employees on the payroll in the pay period including 
March 12. 1967. INCLUDE all those on paid sick leave, paid holidays, and 
paid vacations. INCLUDE salaried officers and executives, if a corporation. 
DO NOT INCLUDE proprietors and partners, if an unincorporated business. 
On this census report show the number of employees of this establishment. 


a. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 


Dollars j Cents 


Key 


j XX 


2-1 


b. Number of paid employees for 
the pay period including 
March 12. 1967 


Number 


2-2 


c. Payroll for the FIRST 
QUARTER of 1967 


Dollars ; Cents 


2-3-+- 


i XX 


7. EMPLOYMENT BY PRINCIPAL ACTIVITY 


Distribute here the employees reported in item 6 according to their principal 
activity during the workwefek ended nearest March 12, 1967. Each employee 
should be counted only once, according to his or her principal activity. 

Selling employees — All employees primarily engaged in selling merchandise 
or services (traveling salesmen, house or telephone salesmen, etc.). 

Office, clerical, warehouse employees — Employees primarily engaged in 
office, clerical, and warehouse work for this establishment (see instruction 
for central administration). 

Central administration — Employees primarily engaged in performing 
various management, accounting, clerical, warehousing, etc. services for other 
establishments of your company. 


a. Selling employees 


Approximate number 
of employees 


Key 




2-7 


b. Office, clerical, and warehousing 

employees servicing this establishment 




2-8 


c. Central administration, storage, etc. 




2-9 


d. Manufacturing (processing merchandise) 




2-10 


e. Other (Describe) 




2-11* 


f, TOTAL (^houlH equal itpm 6b) — . -» 








8. OPERATING EXPENSES AND INVENTORIES 


Line a — Include, in addition to other operating expenses, the payroll of this 
establishment and the pro rata share of any general office expense. Do not 
include the cost of merchandise. Do not include income taxes and excise 
taxes. 

Line b — Report inventories of goods for sale at cost value rather than sale 
price. Include goods owned by you and consigned to others, but not goods 
of others in your possession. Report inventories as of the date specified, or 
nearest inventory date. 


a. Total 1967 operating expenses, 
including payroll 


Dollars [ Cents 


Key 


| XX 


2-4 


b. Merchandise inventories, at cost 

(1) December 31. 1967 

(2) December 31. 1966 


] XX 


2-5 


1 XX 


t 

2-6 


9, WAREHOUSE, STOCKROOM, AND OTHER INVENTORY STORAGE SPACE, DECEMBER 31, 1967 


Lines (1 ) and (2) — Exclude floor space occupied by interior walls, permanent 
aisles, elevator shafts, stairways, offices, receiving and shipping platforms, etc. 

Line b — Net piling space is space for storing commodities — inside space 
measured from wall to wall and from floor to ceiling, less space for ventilation 
(outside of the piling), coils, aisles, posts, sprinklers, etc. 

Line c — If your company, your parent company, or a company corporately 
affiliated with your company, owns the building (or portion of (he building) in 
which your merchandise is warehoused and does not lease space, mark the 
firs) box. If it leases space only, mark the second box. However, if it owns 
a part of the warehouse space and also leases space, mark the third box. 

Line d — Mark the year or period in which the warehouse (or principal building, 
if more than one) was built. 


a. Occupiable warehouse floor space 
(under roof) — occupied and 
unoccupied — of this establishment 

(1) In single story building 


Square feet 


Key 




3-1 


(2) In multiple-story building 




32 




3-3' 


r 


(Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 


b. Refrigerated (net piling) space 
50 degrees Fahrenheit or below 
in this establishment 


Cubic feet 


3-11* 




c. Mark the appropriate box 


3-4 


1 D Our company owns the building 

2 □ Our company leases space only 

3 □ Our company owns space AND also leases warehouse space 




d. Mark the appropriate box 

1 D Completed in 1966-67 7 D 1930-39 

2 D 1960-65 8 □ 1920-29 

3 □ 1955-59 9 D 1910-19 

4 □ 1950-54 D Prior to 1910 

5 D 1945-49 X □ Prior to 1940 

6 □ 1940-44 but age unknown 


/3-5 







162 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-51A-1 -Con. 



10. MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT USED, 
MID-DECEMBER 1967 


11. TRUCKS, TRUCK TRACTORS, AND TRUCK TRAILERS OPER- 
ATED, MID-DECEMBER 1967-Include all street and highway-type 
vehicles owned or leased without drivers. Exclude vehicles held for 
sale and any vehicles leased by you to others. 


a. Did you operate the following equipment in this 
place of business, mid-December 1967? 


3-6X 


a. 1 D None — Mark if this establishment operated none of the 
vehicles described below. 


t 

3-10 


Yes 


No 


b. Number and type of vehicles operated mid-December 1967 


nr 


4-1 


4-2 4-3 


4-4* 




2 


Type 


Code 


Number of veh 


cles 




Total 


Owned 


Leased 
(without 
drivers) 




2 


Overhead track 


1 


2 


Trucks, by body type 
11) Refrigerated trucks 


7 












J 


(2) Closed top vans (except 
refrigerated) 


1 










1 


! 


(3) Open top vans, platform, stake, 
other open top trucks 


2 








b. Enter the number of each of the following used 
in this estabb'shment, mid-December 1967 


Number 


Key 


(4) Pick-up, standard panel, or 
other light delivery trucks 


3 










3-8 


(5) Other over-the-road trucks 


4 








Truck tractors and trailers 
(1) Truck tractors 


8 








(2) Other motorized materials handling 




3-9 


(2) Semitrailers and full trailers 


9 








12. ANALYSIS OF SALES BY PRODUCTS OR COMMODITY LINES -Enter below, the total dollar sales of each product sold by this branch or 

office. Products are listed by classification codes which are similar (at a less detailed level) to those shown on the reporting forms for your manufactur- 
ing plants. Report value of products bought and sold as well as value of products produced by your company and sold by this establishment. If figures 
based on records are not available, give best possible approximations. 


1 v 


Code 


Estimated sales 
during 1967 


Cen- 
sus 
Use 

Only 


1 v 


Code 


Estimated sales 
during 1967 


Cen- 
sus 
Use 

Only 


Description 


Description 


Dollars [Cents 


Dollars ! Cents 


Meat and Poultry 


Products of Dairies 


17. Creamery butter 


20210 


j XX 


013 


1. Fresh beef 


20111 


1 XX 


001 


18. Natural cheese, processed 
cheese 


20221. 
20222 


1 XX 


014 


2. Fresh veal 


20112 


] XX 


002 


19. Dry milk products 


20231 


! XX 


015 


3. Fresh lamb, mutton 


20113 


| XX 


003 


20. Canned milk, bulk evaporated, 
condensed milk products 


20232. 
20233 


1 XX 


016 


4. Pork — fresh, frozen 


20114 


1 XX 


990 


21. Ice cream, ice milk mixes 


20234 


j XX 


017 


5. Processed pork 


20116. 
20136 


j XX 


004 


22. Ice cream, ices, other frozen 
dairy food 


20240 


| XX 


018 


6. Lard 


20115 


| XX 


005 


23. Bulk fluid milk, cream 


20261 


1 XX 


019 


7. Sausage, other prepared meats 
made in this branch 


1 201 17- 
20137 


1 XX 


991 


24. Bottled milk, cream 


20262 


| XX 


020 


8. Sausage, other prepared meats, 
resales 


20117- 
20137 


XX 


006 


25. Cottage cheese, buttermilk, 
chocolate drinks, other 
flavored drinks 


20263. 
20264 


1 XX 


021 


9. Canned meats {except dog food) 


20118. 
20138 


1 XX 


007 


Canned and Preserved Products 


10. Hides,' skins, pelts 


20119 


j XX 


008 


26. Canned, cured seafoods 


20310 




K\ 


022 


11. Natural sausage casings 


20139 


| XX 


009 


27. Canned baby food (except meat) 


20321 




vX 


023 


12. Other meat packing products 


20110 


1 XX 


010 


28. Canned, frozen soups, specialties, 
canned dry beans 


20322. 
20323. 
20324 




tx 


024 


13. Dressed poultry, small game 


20151- 
20155 


j XX 


011 


14. Live poultry 


XXX 


| XX 


901 


29. Canned fruits 


20331 




tx 


025 


15. Eggs, liquid, dried, frozen 


20156 


1 XX 


012 


30. Canned vegetables 


20332 


j 3 


(X 


026 


16. Shell eggs 


XXX 


| XX 


902 


31. Canned fruit juices 


20334 


! ) 


(X 


027 


Canned and Preserved Products — Continued 


Beverages and Related Products 




32. Canned vegetable juices 


20335 


1 

I XX 


028 


64. Malt liquors, brewing by-products 


20820 


| XX 


060 


33. Other canned specialties, hominy, 
mushrooms, catsup, tomato sauce, 
jellies, jams, etc. 


20333, 
20336. 
20338 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 XX 


029 


65. Malt, malt by-products 


20830 


j XX 


061 


66. Wines, brandy, brandy spirits 


20840 


| XX 


062 


34. Dried, dehydrated fruits, 
vegetables, soup mixes 


20340, 
20342 


! XX 


030 


67. Distilled liquor (except brandy) 


20851 


1 XX 


063 


35. Pickles, sauces, include salad 
dressings, sandwich spreads 


20352- 
20354 


! xx 


031 


68. Bottled liquors 


20853 


1 XX 


064 




69. Bottled, canned soft drinks 


20860 




i 


XX 


065 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



163 



FORM CB-51A-1 -Con. 



Fresh and Frozen Fish and Seafood 








36. Froren packaged seafood 


20361, 
20362 




XX 


032 


1 




Miscellaneous Food 


and Related Products 




Frozen Foods 




70. Flavorings 


20870- 
20874 


1 XX 


066 


37. Frozen fruits, juices, ades 


20371 




XX 


033 


71. Cottonseed oil mill products, 
soybean oil products 


20910- 
20929 


XX 


067 


38. Frozen vegetables 


20372 




XX 


034 


72. Products of other vegetable 
oil mills — linseed oil, etc. 


20931- 
20933 


XX 


068 


39. Frozen prepared foods 


20373 




XX 


035 


73. Grease, inedible tallow, feed- 
fertilizer, by-products, etc. 


20941- 
20943 


1 XX 


069 


Flour, Feed, Other Grain Mill Products 




74. Roasted coffee, whole bean 
or ground 


20951 


] XX 


070 


40. Wheat flour (except blended 

and prepared! 


20411 


I XX 


036 


75. Concentrated coffee 


20952 


1 XX 


071 


•11. % heat bran and middlings 


20412 


| XX 


037 


76. Shortenings, cooking oils 


20961 


| XX 


072 


42. Self rising, other prepared 
flour, mixes 


20415. 
20455 


j XX 


038 


77. Margarines 


20962 


j XX 


073 


43. Dry corn milling products, 
other grain mill products 


20413, 
20416 


] XX 


039 


78. Manufactured ice 


20970 


1 XX 


074 


44. Poultry feeds 


20421 


j XX 


040 


79. Natural ice 


XXX 


| XX 


903 


45. Livestock feeds 


20422 


j XX 


041 


80. Macaroni, noodle products 


20980 


1 XX 


075 


46. Dog and cat food 


20423 


| XX 


042 


81. Desserts, ready-to-mix 


20991 


! XX 


076 


47. Other prepared animal feeds 


20424 


| XX 


043 


82. Chips, potato, corn. etc. 


20992 


I XX 


077 


48. Cereal breakfast foods 


20430. 


I XX 


044 


83. Sweetenings, syrups, molasses 


20993 


1 XX 


078 


49. Milled rice, by-products 


20440 


j XX 


045 


84. Tea 


XXX 


XX 


904 


50. Wet corn milling products 


20460 


1 XX 


046 


85. Other food products 


20610. 
20994- 
20999 


1 XX 


079 


Bread and Other Bakery Products 


86. Agricultural seed 


XXX 


1 XX 


905 


51. Bread, bread-type rolls 


20511 


! XX 


047 


Tobacco 


Products 




52. Sweet yeast goods 


20512 


1 

| XX 


048 


87. Cigarettes 


21110 


j XX 


080 


53. Soft cakes 


20513 


1 

1 XX 


049 


88. Cigars 


21210 


| XX 


081 


54. Pies, pastries, donuts, 
handmade cookies 


20514- 
20517 


1 

XX 


050 


89. Chewing, smoking tobacco, snuff 


21310 


\\ 


082 


55. Biscuits, crackers, pretzels 


20521 


XX 


051 


90. Stemmed, redried tobacco 


21411, 

21412 


1 XX 


083 


56. Other "dry" bakery products, 
include machine made cookies, 
ice cream cones 


20522 


1 
1 
1 

1 XX 


052 


u l. I'nstemmed leaf tobacco, not 
redried before packing 


XXX 


! xx 


906 


Sugar and Related Products 


Other Prod 


uets (Specify) 




57. Refined cane sugar, by-products 


20620 


1 
1 

I XX 


053 


92. 




I XX 




93. 




] XX 




58. Refined beet sugar, by-products 


20630 


1 
! xx 


054 


94. 




j XX 




Confectionery Products 


95. 




1 XX 




59. Confectionery products 


20710- 

21)716 


1 

] XX 


055 


96. 




! XX 




97. 




[ XX 




60. Chocolate coatings 


20721 


1 
! xx 


056 


98. 




1 XX 




61. Confectionery-type chocolate 
made in chocolate plants 


20722 


] XX 


057 


99. Receipts from services and sources 
other lhan the sale of merchandise 




] XX 


999 


62. Other chocolate, cocoa products 
made in chocolate plants 


20728. 
20998 


1 

| XX 


058 


101). TOTAL SALES IN 1967 *- 

(Sum of lines 1-99 should 
be same as item 5a.) 




I XX 





63. Chewing gum, chewing gum base 


20730 


! XX 


059 


13. 
CERTIFICATION 


Name of person lo contact regarding this report 


A, 


dress (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 


Telephone No. 


Area code 


Number 


Exten 


sior, 


This report is substantially accurate and covers 


he per 


■nd from 










Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 



164 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67017 



formCB— 54B 

(5402) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

BAKERIES 



PLEASE READ 

ACCOMPANYING INSTRUCTIONS 

BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



□ Yes 



□ No (If "No," enter trade 
name above the label.) 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number | 



CB-54B (5402) 



Employer 
Identification No. [ 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. □ The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. □ The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. □ Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete e, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2, complete d and e below.) 



c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 



State 



City, village, or other place 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



e. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 D Yes 2 D No 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 

□ Yes □ No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits)) 



LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 D Other (Specify) 



X-l 



2 □ No 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this establishment in business 

at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations 

answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



X-2 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3 



5. CLASS OF CUSTOMER 

Mark the box which indicates the class of customer which 
accounts for more than half of your entry in item 7a. If no 
one class accounts for more than half, indicate approximate 
percentage next to each box. 

1 % □ General public (household consumers, 

farmers, and individuals) 



X-4 



% D Business firms, government, and institutions 
% □ Other (Specify) 



6. METHOD OF SELLING 

Mark the box which describes your principal method 
of selling. Do not mark more than one box. 

1 □ Selling at this establishment 

2 D Mail order (catalog selling) 

3 □ House-to-house (direct selling) 

4 □ Operating merchandise vending machines 



X-5 



7. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Sales of merchandise and other 
receipts from customers 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



b. Does the entry in "a" include 
sales taxes and excise taxes 
collected from customers? 1 □ Yes 



2 □ No 



If "No," how much did you 
forward to taxing agencies 
for such taxes? 



d. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



XX 



Key 



X-6 



X-7 



8. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box □ if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



X-8 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, 
ZIP code) 



X-9* 



EI No. (9 digits) 



DEPARTMENT OR CONCESSION LOCATED IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ANOTHER FIRM 

a. Ig your business at this location conducted as a department or concession (such as a bakery 
department in a grocery store) in an establishment operated by another firm? 

Mark "Yes," if customers normally consider your operation as part of the establishment operated 
by the other firm, or if your sales to customers are billed by that establishment. 



u± 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



b. If "Yes," please enter the name and description 
(kind of business) of the establishment which is 
operated by the other firm 



Name 



Kind of business 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



165 



FORM CB-54B-Con. 



10. DEPARTMENT OR CONCESSION LOCATED IN THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

a. Is any department, concession, or business not owned by you, operated with.n this establishment 
Mark "Yes," if there is any operation of others which customers normally consider part of your 
establishment, or if you bill customers for sales of such department, concession, or business. 

b. If "Yes," please complete a line for each. 



12- 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



2XX 



2-3 



2-4 



2-5 



2-6* 



Name and address of owner 
of department or concession 



Kind of business 

of department or 

concession 



Estimated 

sales during 

1967 



Are the 

sales of this 

department 

included in 

item 7a? 



Is the pay- 
roll of this 
department 
included in 
item 7d? 



Census 
Um 
Only 



Dollars 



No 



Yes 



No 



11. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your 
main selling location and facilities other than selling establishments 

(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State, ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Sales 



Dollars 



Cents 



Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Sales total should equal the entry in item 7a) 



XX 



12. FLOOR SPACE 

a. Selling space in store., 

b. Total space in store.... 



Square feet 



Key 



1-3 



1-4 



00-0* 

es of each of the listed 
:o determine or estimate 



14. MERCHANDISE LINES- Report the dollar volume or the percent of sal 
merchandise lines. Estimated figures are acceptable. If it is not feasible 
amounts for minor lines (i.e. any accounting for less than one percent of your total sales), mark (X) 
in column (3) on such lines. 

Make sure there is an entry in columns (1). (2), or (3) for every line for which you had any sales. 

NOTE: Entries on the following lines should exclude sales from vending machines owned 
by others. You may report either in dollars or as a percent of total. 



13. KIND OF BUSINESS 



If one of the following titles adequately describes your 
kind of business, place a "1" on that line and make 
no entries on the other lines. If no one title describes 
your business adequately, place a "1" next to the title 
which indicates your most important activity, a "2" 
next to the second most important, etc. 



Merchandise lines 



(1) 



| (2) 13) 14) 



Estimated sales 
during 1967 



Dollars 



Per- 
cent 



Sales 
less 
than 

Wo 



Cen- 
sus 
Use 

Only 



5462007- 



-Bakery (baking on premises) 



Groceries, other food items for preparation and consumption away from 
this establishment (including candy, bottled or canned soft drinks) 



5463005 Bakery goods store 

(no baking on premises) 



5411004 Grocery store 

541 1004 Delicatessen 

5411004 Food supermarket 

5399019 General store 

5321039 Mail order food 

5341052 Merchandise vending machine 

operator 



5351143 Beer or liquor distributor 

(route delivery) 



5441001 Candy, nut, confectionery store 

5499025 Coffee, tea, spice store 



a. Bakery products, except frozen 



b. Bakery products, frozen 



c. All other items on line 1 



d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through c) 



2. Meals, snacks, sandwiches, nonalcoholic beverages 
generally served for consumption at this establishment 



3. Cigars, cigarettes, tobacco (exclude sales from 
vending machines owned by others) 



4. Cosmetics, drugs, health, first aid and 

sickroom needs, toiletries, dentifrices, soaps 
and detergents, household cleansers 



5. Alcoholic drinks (served at this establishment) 



6. Packaged liquor, wine and beer 



7. Men's and boys' clothing and furnishings (exclude foot- 
wear; all footwear should be reported on line 9) 



8. All women's and girls' clothing and acce§»oriet, 
infants' and children's wear, etc. (exclude footwear; 
all footwear should be reported on line 9) 



025 



026 



027 



560 



040 



100 



120 



060 



080 



140 



1M 



166 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-54B-Con. 



9000001 Dairy plant (pasteurizing or 

bottling on the premises) 



5351069 Dairy route (no pasteurizing or 

bottling on the premises) 



5451000- 



-Dairy products store (no pasteurizing 
or bottling on the premises) 



5499017 Egg, poultry dealer 

5421029 Fish (seafood) market 

5431002 Fruit stand, vegetable market 

5499025 Health food, vitamin store 

5421011 Meat market 

5351085 Soft drink distributor (route delivery) 



.Other kind of business 
(Describe kind; if manufacturing, 
name products manufactured.) 



15. VENDING MACHINE OPERATORS 

If you marked the box "Operating merchandise 
vending machines" in items 6 and 13, enter the 
number of each type of machine on location at the 
end of 1967. 



| 3XX 1 Number | Key 



9. All footwear 



10. Curtains, draperies, bedsheets, blankets, linens, 
piece goods, patterns, laces, trimmings, notions, 
closet accessories, blinds, window shades 



11. Major household appliances, radio, TV, 

record players, tape recorders, records, tapes, 
sheet music, musical instruments 



12. Furniture, sleep equipment, floor coverings 



13. Kitchenware, small electric appliances, china, 
glassware, lamps, lamp shades, mirrors, pictures, 
and other home furnishings 



14. Jewelry, watches, clocks, silverware, optical goods 



15. Sporting and recreational equipment, 
boats, bicycles, luggage, hunting, 
fishing, camping equipment 



16. Hardware, tools, electrical supplies, 
gardening equipment and supplies 



17. Lumber, millwork, building materials, paints, 

heating and plumbing equipment, home repair and 
modernization equipment and supplies (include 
major appliances on line 11 — not here) 



18. Automobiles, trucks, other powered road vehicles 



19. Automotive fuels and lubricants 



20. Automobile tires, tubes, batteries, 
accessories, parts 



180 



200 



220 



240 



260 



280 



300 



320 



340 



380 



400 



420 



1. Cigars, cigarettes, and tobacco 



2. Milk and ice crean 



3. Soft drinks (not including fruit 
and vegetable juices) 
a. Bottled 



b. Cup 



4. Coffee, soup, other hot beverages 



5. Candy, confectionery, gum, nuts 



6. Hot foods (not including 
beverages) 



7. Cookies, crackers, biscuits and 
other nonrefrigerated foods 
not listed above 



8. Sandwiches, salads, and other 
refrigerated foods not listed 
above 



9. Other types (Specify) 



10. TOTAL (Sum of lines 1 
through 9) 



21. Farm equipment, machinery 



3-3 



22. Hay, grain, feed, fertilizer, farm supplies 



34 



23. Fuels (coal and wood, oil, LP gas), ice 



35 



24. All other merchandise (photographic equipment 
and supplies, toys, books, magazines, newspapers, 
stationery, baby carriages, etc.) 



3-6 



(If sales of merchandise on this line is more than 
10% of total sales, specify principal lines) 



3-7 



3-8 



3-9 



25. All nonmerchandise receipts from customers. 



440 



460 



480 



500 



520 



3-10 



3-11 



(Include receipts from carrying charges and all other 
charges to customers for credit. Also include all 
receipts from customers for installation, delivery, 
repair, maintenance, on-site construction, and rental 
of tools and equipment.) If sales and excise taxes 
are not included in the entries on lines 1-24, include 
them with other nonmerchandise receipts on this line. 



3-12' 



1-6* 



26. TOTAL (Lines 1 through 25 — should equal 
sum of figures in items 7a and 7c.) 



540 



16. 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



Area code 



Number 



Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from . 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Date 



FORM CB-54B 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



167 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form approved: Budgel Bureau No. 41-S67017 



form CB— 59F 

(5906) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



COOPERATIVES 



PLEASE READ 

ACCOMPANYING INSTRUCTIONS 

BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



D Yes 



□ No (If "No," enter trade 
name above the label.) 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number Hi 



CB-59F(5906) 



Employer 
Identification No. I 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. □ The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. Q The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. D Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2, complete d and e below.) 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 



State 



City, village, or other place 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

ct. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 D Yes 2 D No 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 

D Yes □ No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits)) 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 Q Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 D Other (Specify) 



X-l 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this establishment in business 

at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 2 D No 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 

answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



X-2 



How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3 



5. CLASS OF CUSTOMER 

Enter percentage of your total receipts (item 7a) 
received from sales to: 



1. Other cooperative associations 

2. Farmers 

3. Household consumers, individual users 

4. Business firms, government, and institutions.. 

5. Other (Specify) 

6. TOTAL 



X-4 



Per- 
cent 



100% 



Key 



4XX 



4-3 



4-7' 



6. METHOD OF SELLING 

Mark the box which describes your principal method 
of selling. Do not mark more than one box. 

1 Q Selling at this establishment 

2 D Mail order (catalog selling) 

3 D House-to-house (direct selling) 

4 D Operating merchandise vending machines 



X-5 



7. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



a. Sales of merchandise and other 
receipts from customers 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



Does the entry in "a" include 

sales taxes and excise taxes 

collected from customers? 1 D Yes 2 D No 



If "No," how much did you 
forward to taxing agencies 
for such taxes? 



d. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



XX 



Key 



X-6 



X-7 



8. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box D if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



X-8 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, 
ZIP code) 



X-9* 



EI No. (9 digits) 



9. Not applicable to this form 



1XXXX 



Key 



15 



168 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-59F-Con. 



10. RECEIPTS FROM 1 V 


(1XX) 


c 




(4) 


11.' SUMMARY OF BUSINESS 






Dollars 


Cents 


1-6 


MARKETING ACTIVITIES 

a. Grains, beans 


Dollars 




Code 


IN 1967 

a. Marketing 

(Total should be the same 
as item 10, line i) 




XX 


j XX 


710 


b. Dairy products 




XX 


720 


c. Livestock, excluding horses 
and mules 




XX 


730 


b. Petroleum 

(Include here only sales 
from bulk plants) 




XX 


1-7 


d. Fresh fruits, vegetables, berries 




XX 


740 


c. Supply activities 

(Total should be the same 
as item 13, line 26) 




1-8 


e. Poultry, eggs 




XX 


750 




XX 


f. Leaf tobacco 




XX 


760 


d. Services 

(Total should be the same 
as item 17, line g) 






1-9 


g. Cotton (raw), linters 




XX 


770 


1 

1 


h. Other (Specify) 




XX 


780 




XX 


e. TOTAL RECEI 

(Should be the sa 






XX 


1-10* 






XX 


700 


ne as the sum 






12. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 


1 D Yes 2 D No 


b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your 
main selling location and facilities other than selling establishments 
(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.) 




Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county, State, ZIP code) 


Description of business 


Census 
Use 
Only 


Sales 


Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 


Dollars j Cents 


1. 






j XX 




2. 






j XX 




3. 






1 XX 




4. 






I XX 




Totals for this Employer Identification Number 


] xx 




(Sales total should equal the entry in item 7a) 




13. RECEIPTS FROM SUPPLY ACTIVITIES, EXCEPT BULK SALES OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 

Report the dollar volume or the percent of sales of each of the listed Make sure there is an entry in columns (1), (2), or (3) for every line for which 

merchandise lines. Estimated figures are acceptable. If it is not you had any sales. 

feasible to determine or estimate amounts for minor lines (i.e. any tusvt>i? r . • .urn* i* i_ u ' i..j- »„i«» j*_ 

- , . . - .11, * , v , ■ NOTE: Entries on the following lines should exclude sales Irom 
accounting tor less than one percent of your total sales), mark (A) in j- i_- _i i_ »■_ v 

\ ,„f , ,. p J vending machines owned by others. You may report 
column 3) on such lines. ... • j n . *■ . . i 

either in dollars or as a percent of total. 


1 v 


(1) | (2) 


(3) 


(4) 


Merchandise li 


1 v 


(1) | (2] 


(3) 


(4) 


Merchandise lines 


Estimated sales 
during 1967 


Sales 
less 
than 

1% 


Cen- 
sus 
Use 

Only 


nes 


Estimated sales 
during 1967 


Sales 
less 
than 
1% 


Cen- 
sus 
Use 
Only 


Dollars 


Per- 
cent 




Dollars 


Per- 
cent 


1. Hardware, tools, electrical supplies, 
gardening equipment and supplies 








320 


15. Men's and boys' clothing and fur- 
nishings (exclude footwear; all foot- 
wear should be reported on line 17) 








140 


2. Lumber, millwork, building materials, paints, heating and plumbing 
equipment, home repair and modernization equipment and supplies 
(include major appliances on line 19 — not here) 


16. All women's and girls' clothing and 
accessories, infants' and children's 
wear, etc. (exclude footwear; all foot- 
wear should be reported on line 17) 








160 


a. Lumber, millwork 








362 


b. Other building materials 








363 


17. All footwear 








180 


c. TOTAL (Sum of lines a and b) 








340 


18. Curtains, draperies, bedsheets, 
blankets, linens, piece goods, 
patterns, laces, trimmings, notions, 
closet accessories, blinds, window 
shades 








200 


3. Automobiles, trucks, other 
powered road vehicles 








380 


4. Automotive fuels and lubricants 








400 


19. Major household appliances, radio, TV, 
record players, tape recorders, records, 
tapes, sheet music, musical instruments 








220 


5. Automobile tires, tubes, batteries, 
accessories, parts 








420 


20. Furniture, sleep equipment, 
floor coverings 








240 


6. Farm equipment, machinery 








440 






21. Kitchenware, small electric appli- 
ances, china, glassware, lamps, lamp 
shades, mirrors, pictures, and other 
home furnishings 








260 















CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



169 



FORM CB-59F-Con. 



Hay. grain, feed, fertilizer, farm supplies 



a. Hay. grain, feeds 



b. Seed 



Fertilizers, insecticides, 
lungicides. etc. 



461 



462 



463 



22. Jewelry, watches, clocks, silverware, 
optical goods 



23. Sporting and recreational equip- 
ment, boats, bicycles, luggage, hunt- 
ing, fishing, camping equipment 



280 



300 



d. Other farm supplies 



464 



e. TOTAL (Sum of lines 
a through dl 



460 



24. All other merchandise (photographic 
equipment and supplies, toys, books, 
magazines, newspapers, stationery, 
baby carriages, etc.) 



500 



8. Fuels (coal and wood. oil. LP gas), ice 



480 



(If sales of merchandise on this line 
is more than ]0% of total sales, 
specify principal lines) 



9. Groceries, other food items for 
preparation and consumption away 
from this establishment (including 
candy, bottled or canned soft drinks) 



020 



25. All nonmerchandise receipts 
from customers 



520 



10. Meals, snacks, sandwiches, non- 
alcoholic beverages generally served 
for consumption-at this establishment 



040 



11. Alcoholic drinks (served at this 
establishment) 



060 



12. Packaged liquor, wine and beer 



080 



13. Cigars, cigarettes, tobacco 
(exclude sales from vending 
machines owned by others) 



100 



Exclude those receipts from services 
covered in item 17. (Include receipts 
from carrying charges and all other 
charges to customers for credit. 
Also include all receipts from cus- 
tomers for installation, delivery, 
repair, maintenance, on-site con- 
struction, and rental of tools and 
equipment.) If sales and excise 
taxes are not included in the entries 
on lines 1-24, include them with 
other nonmerchandise receipts on 
this line. 



14. Cosmetics, drugs, health, first aid 
and sickroom needs, toiletries, 
dentifrices, soaps and detergents, 
household cleansers 



120 



26. TOTAL (Lines 1 through 
25 — should he the same 
as item lie.) *- 



540 



14. BULK PETROLEUM STORAGE CAPACITY 

December 31. 1967 storage capacity for bulk products 

a. Above ground capacity for gasoline, kerosene, distillate and residual fuels 



Gallons 



Key 



5XX 



b. Liquefied petroleum and refinery gas. excluding bottle gas (include underground storage capacity) 



15. GRAIN ELEVATORS 

If this report covers a grain elevator, enter approximate bin space (rated capacity), December 31, 1967 



Bushels 



5-5 



16. MIXED FEEDS 

What percent of the total sales of this establishment in 1967 was from sales of feeds (animal and poultry) mixed 
in this establishment? 



Percent 



5-6+ 



17. RECEIPTS FOR SERVICES 

a. Storage for Commodity Credit Corporation 



Dollars 



Cents 



Code 



XX 



810 



b. Storage for others 



XX 



820 



c. Hauling, trucking, etc. 



XX 



d. Custom grinding and mixing, hulling, cleaning, cotton ginning drying, etc. 



XX 



e. Automobile repair services, etc. 



XX 



850 



f. Other (locker rental, lime spreading, packing, etc.) (Specify type of service) 



XX 



860 



g. TOTAL (Should be same as item lld)- 



XX 



18. OTHER INFORMATION 

a. Does this cooperative operate on the basis of one member — one vote? 1 □ Yes 2 D No 



Key 



5-7 



b. How many members (owners of cooperative stock) did this association have as of December 31 ■ 1967? Number_ 



c. Mark the principal kind of owners or members of this association: 



1 □ Farmers 2 □ Consumers 
3 □ Other (Specify) 



5-9 



d. Does this association normally pay patronage refunds, if earned? 1 □ Yes 2 D No 



5-10" 



19. 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report \ddross 'N 



street, city. Slate. /.IP rode 



Telephone \„. 



Area i-ntlr \unil 



T*TT7 



This report i> substantially accurate and covers the period from 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Dale 



FORM CB-59F 



170 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30. 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67014 



FORM CB — 70 
(7000) 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

HOTELS, MOTELS, TOURIST COURTS, 
TRAILER PARKS, CAMPS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Please complete and return thisform in the envelope provided. 

If you operated more than one establishment (location) under the same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967. entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item I. enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 7 provide information 
separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return. Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE- Kesponse to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may he seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only lor statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your hies are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number j^ 



CB-70{7000) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 



a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



D Yes 



Q No (If "No," enter trade 
name above the label.) 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. □ The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. The mail address of your. establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. D Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 
(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2, complete d and e below.) 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Nun 



nd street 



City, villa 



' plact 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes 



D No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY 
OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 D Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other (Specify) 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 



a. Was this establishment in business 
at the end of 1967? 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 
during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 
answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 
at the end of the year.) 



Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 D Yes 2D No 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



5. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Line a(l)-(4) — Include only receipts from customers; excise taxes and 
sales taxes, total charges for services or for use of facilities and merchandise 
sold whether or not payment was received in 1967. Do not include com- 
missions from vending machine operators, rents, sale of real estate, etc. 

Line b — Include all wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, fees, vacation 
and sick leave pay, the cash equivalent of payments in kind such as goods, 
lodging, food, and clothing. Include reported tips and gratuities received 
by your employees from others. Do not include payments to. or withdrawals 
by, proprietors or partners of unincorporated businesses. 



Receipts from services and 
sales of merchandise 

(1) First quarter 1967 (Jan.-March) 



(2) Second quarter 1967 (April-June) 



(3) Third quarter 1967 (July-Sept.) 



Fourth quarter 1967 (Oct. -De 



(5) TOTAL 1967- 



b. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions. 



Cents 



XX 



Key 



X4 



XX X-5XX 



6. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box Q if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 



b. Mark this box D if this business owns or controls any othtrr company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 d gits) 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



171 



FORM CB-70-Con. 



7. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

11. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes." is marked above, separately list belnv* each location, including your 
main selling locatii >i ami facilities other than selling establishments 
(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 D Yes 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county, Slate. ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Census 
Use 

Only 



Number of 
paid employee 
(Pay period 
including 
March 12) 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Sales total should equal the entry in item 5a(5)) 



8. KIND OF BUSINESS 



Mark only ONE line. If this establishment was engaged in more 
than one of the kinds of activity listed, mark the one which 
accounted for the major portion of your receipts in 1967. 



7011109. 
7011208. 
701 1307 _ 
701 1406 _ 
701 1505 _ 
7031008 _ 
7032006 . 
7032006 _ 
7032006 . 
7032006 _ 



.Year-round hotel with 25 or more guest rooms 



.Year-round hotel with 1 
.Seasonal hotel (open lei 
-Motel, tourist court 
_ Motor hotel 
.Trailer park 
-Fishing camp 
_ Hunting camp 
_ Children's camp 
.Other sporting and recreation 
(Specify) 



s than 25 guest rooms 
than 10 months each year) 



-Tourist home 

_ Other kind of business 
(Specify kind) 



Is ihis establishment a member of one 
of the following types of groups V 



(1) Franchise or co-ownership group 
carrying common name 



(2) Other referral organizatio 



1 D Yes 2 D No 
1 D Yes 2 D No 



If "Yes," to either question (1) or (2) above, 
please furnish name of the group to which 
this establishment belongs. 



(1) Do you consider this establishment 
a resort operation? 



(2) Is this establishment open less than 
10 months of the year? 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



D Yes 2D No 



RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

a. Are any of the facilities listed on the numbered lines below operated as a part of this establishment 
either by you or by a concessionaire? 



Yes No 

.ID 2D 



b. If "Yes" above, please mark a box on each line. 



1 



(1) Swimming pool. 



Yes 

1 □ 



No 
2 D 



(2) Boating ID 2D 

(3) Private bathing beach ID 2D 



1-9* 



Yes No 

(4) Golf course ID 2D 

(5) Tennis ID 2D 

(6) Horseback riding ID 2D 

(7) Skiing ID 2D 



10. ANALYSIS OF 1967 RECEIPTS 



Report in item 10 receipts from guests for use of facilities operated 
by you at this location. If you do not have separate book records 
for these figures, enter your best estimate for each line. Include 
all excise taxes, sales taxes, and amusement taxes collected from 
customers. The total shown on line a(9) should equal total receipts 
in item 5. Neither the total nor your share of the receipts from 
coin-operated machines operated by others on your premises are 
to be included in item 10a. Include your share of such receipts on 
line 10b. If other owners conduct business operations on your 
premises, include your rental receipts from these businesses on 
line 10b. 



Line a(l) — Report receipts from guest room and unit rentals 
including those used for business purposes. Report rentals of 
public rooms on line a(8) and store rentals on line b. Receipts 
from rentals of trailer space at this location should be reported 
on line a(8). 



Line a(l) and a(2) — Establishments which include meals as part 
of their rates should estimate the data on lines a(l) and a(2) if book 
records are not kept. 



Line a(8) — Report receipts from public room rentals and also 
receipts from guests for laundering, valet, checking, repairs, tele- 
phone, and other services. 



Line b — Report rental and commission receipts from operators of 
leased departments, concessions, stores, and other rentals at this 
location not included in item 10a. Also include here YOUR SHARE 
of the receipts of coin-operated machines operated by OTHERS 
on your premises. 



a. Receipts from customers 



(1) Guest room or unit rentals 



(2) Sales of meals and 
nonalcoholic beverages 



(3) Sales of alcoholic beverages 
(liquor, wine and beer for con- 
sumption in bar or dining room) 



(4) Sales of packaged liquor, 
wine or beer 



(5) Receipts from automobile 
services except sales of 
gasoline, oils, etc. 



(6) Sales of gasoline, oils, etc. 



(7) Sales of other merchandise 



(8) Other receipts from patrons 



(9) TOTAL (Sum of lines UH8) 
above should be the same as in 
item 5e) — — ^» 



b. Other rental and concession receipts 



Dollars 



Cent 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



Key 



2-1 



2-2 



2-3 



2-4 



2-5 



2-6 



2-7 



2-8 



2-9 



2-10* 



172 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-70-Con. 



11. NUMBER AND TYPE OF GUEST UNITS 
FOR HOTELS AND MOTELS 

Guest rooms or units consist of the number of rooms or units 
which can be rented as a single unit. Suites of rooms which 
cannot be subdivided should be counted as a single unit. 



Number of guest units or rooms which 
were used primarily as: 



(1) Transient guest rooms 



Number 



Key 



3-1 



12. LENGTH OF STAY 

Please mark the box below which accounts for the largest 
volume of guest room or unit rental receipts in item lOaf 1 ) above. 
(Estimates are acceptable.) 

1 D Less than 1 week 

2 □ One week to 1 month 

3 □ More than 1 month 



3 7 



(2) Residential guest rooms 
(guests staying for 
1 month or longer) 



3-2 



13. PERIOD IN OPERATION 

a. Mark the box which indicates when this lodging place was 
first operated under the present ownership or control. 



(3) TOTAL (Sum of lines (1) and (2))- 



3 3 



b. (1) Are off-street parking facilities available to patrons 
of this establishment without charge at this location? 



1 □ Before 1942 

2 D 1942-1948 

3 □ 1949-1954 



4 D 1955-1958 

5 D 1959-1963 

6 □ 1964-1967 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



34 



(2) Does this establishment have public rooms 
for meetings, banquets, etc.? 

1 D Yes 2 D No 



b. Was this establishment operated as a 

lodging place prior to the time it came under 
the present ownership or control? 



3-5 



1 □ Yes 



2 D No 



(3) How many floor levels have guest accommodations? 
Count the ground floor as one level if it has such 
accommodations. 



1 □ One 

2 D Two 



3 D Three 

4 D Four or more 



3-6 



1 □ Before 1942 

2 D 1942-1948 

3 □ 1949-1954 



4 □ 1955-1958 

5 □ 1959-1963 

6 □ 1964-1967 



3-8 



3-9 



c. If "Yes." mark the box which to the best of your knowledge 3.10 
or belief indicates when this establishment was first operated 
as a lodging place. 



14. PERCENTAGE OF OCCUPANCY IN 1967 FOR HOTELS, MOTOR HOTELS, AND MOTELS 

Your percentage of occupancy may be computed as follows: 

a. Multiply the number of guest rooms in your estab- c. Your percentage of occupancy is the number you 
lishment by 365. (If you operated less than a full get in b divided by the number you get in a. 

year use the number of days you actually operated 
instead of 365.) 



b. Determine the number of rooms which were occu- 
pied each day that you operated. Total these 
figures for all days operated. 



If records are not available as a basis for computing 
percentage of occupancy your best estimate will 
be acceptable. 



3-1 1* 



Percentage of occupancy 
(See instructions for 
method of computing) 



15. 



CERTIFICATION 



FORM CB-70 



Name i>l person to contact regarding this report Address (Number, street, city. Slate. ZIP code) 



Telephone N.I 



Area cede \umher Extension 



This repnrl is substantially accurate and cciyers the period (run 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Dale 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



173 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41 -S67014 



>ORw CB-80 
(8000) 



US- DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BURtAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



DENTAL LABORATORIES 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



PI 



■ mplele and return this form in the envelope provided. 

ll you operated more than one establishment (location) under the same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967. entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1. enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 7 provide information 
separately for each location. 

II your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967. submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal year 
which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, JefTersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE -Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law. your report to the Census Bureau is confidential, ll may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in >our hies arc immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Numbe 



CB-80 (8000) 



2 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



D Yes 



D N«. 



(If "No." enter trade 
name above the label.) 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. D The mail address of your establishment but nol 

the actual physical location. 

2. D The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. Q Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: ll you marked box 1 or 3, or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2, complete (1 and e below. I 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Numb. 



id sired 



City. 



or other pla 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 

1 D Yes 2 D No 



5. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Receipts from services and 
sales of merchandise 



Do 



|Ce 



i XX 



Key 



X-4 



INCLUDE: Only receipts from customers; excise taxes and sales taxes, 
total charges for services or for use of facilities and merchandise sold 
whether or not payment was received in 1967. 



b. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



I Cents 



XX 



Key 



X-5 



INCLUDE: All wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, fees, I 

vacation and sick leave pay. the cash equivalent of payments in kind such 
as goods, lodging, food, and clothing. INCLUDE reported tips and gratui- 
ties received by your employees from others. DO NOT include payments 
to, or withdrawals by. proprietors or partners of unincorporated businesses. 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes 



D No (If "No." enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY I 

OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 D Individual proprietor 

2 D Partnership 

n Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 D Other (Specify) 



X-l 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this establishment in business 

at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 2D No 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 

answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



X-2 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3 



6. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box D if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box □ if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city. State. 
ZIP code) 



El No. (9 digits! 



174 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-80-Con. 



7. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one loeation under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your 
main selling location and facilities other than selling establishments 

(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. Stale. ZIP codel 



Description of business 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Sales or receipts 



Doll 



Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 



XX 



XX 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Sales total should cental the cnlrj in item Si 



XX 



8. KIND OF BUSINESS 

If this is a dental laboratory, mark the item below. If not. or if receipts for dental laboratory services 
account for less than 50 percent of your total receipts, complete b below. 



X-8 * 



8072001. 



-Dental laboratory 



. Other kind of business 
iSpecify kind) 



9. TYPE OF WORK PERFORMED BY PAID EMPLOYEES AND PROPRIETORS 



Technicians are defined as those who spend at least 60 
percent of their time at the bench and/or directly super- 
vising other technicians. 

Include both full and part workweek employees in item 
a. Each paid employee should be counted once only, 
and included in that activity which accounts for most 
of the type of work done by the employee. 



a. Paid employees for workweek 
including March 12, 1967 



(1) Technicians 



(2) All other employees 



(3) TOTAL (Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



b. Active proprietors of unincorporated 
businesses. 
(1) Technicians 



(2) All other employees 



(3) TOTAL (Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



Number 



Key 



1-1 



1-2 



13 



1-4 



15 



1-6* 



This space may be used for any explanations that may be helpful in understanding your report. 

















10. 
CERTIFICATION 


Name of person to contact regarding this report 


Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 


Telephone No. 


Area code 


Number 


Extension 


This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from 


tn 






Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 


FORM CB-80 












1 00-075 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



175 



KNAITY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Approval: Budget Bu 



No. 41 -S67061 



fo«m CB— 81 
(8100) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUHEAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES 



LAW FIRMS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 
Please complete and relurn this form in the envelope provided. 

If you operated more than one establishment (location) under (he same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967, entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1, enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 12 provide information 
separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967, submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 
This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal 
year which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jefferson ville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE -Response to this inquiry is required by law (title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
luw, your report t « » tin- Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in ynur hies are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
please refer to this Census File Number* 



CB-81 (8100) 



Employer 
Identification Noj 



1. NAME OF FIRM 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
firm is known to the public? 

D Yes □ No (If "No," enter firm name above the label.) 

b. Is the address shown the actual physical location of 
the main office of this firm? 

D Yes □ No 

If "No," enter below the number, street, city. State, 
and ZIP code of this firm's main office. 



Number and street 



City, village, or other place 



Does this firm provide legal services for clients? 

D Yes □ No (If "No," DO NOT answer other questions. 

SIGN CERTIFICATION on reverse and retu 
form in enclosed envelope.) 



NOTE: The term "firm" includes "sole practitioners." 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this firm on your latest 1967 Employer's 
Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



D Ye 



D No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits))- 



3. FORM OF PRACTICE 

1 D Sole practitioner (Individual proprietor) 

2 D Partnership 

3 D Individual lawyer, engaged in group practice 

4 □ Other (Specify) 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 

a. Was this firm engaged in the practice 

of law at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 2 D No 

NOTE: For firms which were inactive during 
December 1967 due to part-time activities answer 
"Yes," unless the firm was no longer in practice 
at the end of the year. 



b. How many months during 1967 was 
the firm in practice? 



X-3f 



5. TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Line a(l)— Include all the receipts from the practice of law. 

Line a(2) — Include all other receipts from clients, such as commissions 
for the management or sale of real estate, insurance, etc. Do not include 
gross receipts from the rental or sale of real estate, or income from investments. 

Line b — Include all salaries, wages, commissions, bonuses, vacation allow- 
ances, and the value of payments in kind, such as goods, lodging, food and 
clothing. Include reported tips, gratuities, etc. received by your employees 
from others. Do not include payments to (or withdrawals by) proprietors 
or partners of this firm. 



a. Total receipts during 1967 



(1) Receipts for legal services 
performed 



(2) All other receipts 



(3) TOTAL receipts 

(Sum of lines (1) and (2)) 



TOTAL ANNUAL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Key 



T 



6. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box D if this firm is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 



b. Mark this box D if this firm owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 digits) 



7. NATURE OF PRACTICE 



FOR CENSUS USE 
ONLY 



Key 



a. Is this firm engaged in any specialized field of practice which 
accounted for 25% or more of this firm's receipts during 1967? 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



b. If "Yes," enter the percentage for each of the specialized fields 
which accounted for 25% or more of this firm's receipts. (Estimates 
are acceptable.) 



NOTE: "General Practice" should not be considered a specialised field. 



Specialized fields 



(1) Banking and commercial law 



(2) Corporations 



(3) Criminal law 



(4) Domestic relations 



(5) Insurance law 



(6) Negligence — defendant 



(7) Negligence — plaintiff 



(8) Patent, trademark and copyright law 



(9) Real estate 



(10) Taxation 



(11) Wills, estate planning, and probate 



(12) Other specialized field (Specify) 



Percentage of 
firm's receipts 



Key 



1-1 
1-2 

13 

1-4 

1-5 

1-6 

17 

1-8 

1-9 

1-10 

111 



176 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-81-Con. 



8. CLASS OF CLIENT 

What percentage of your total receipts in 1967 was from each of the 
following classes of clients? (Estimates are acceptable.) 



Class of clients 



Individuals, estates, personal work for farmers 



b. Trade, farming, industrial, transportation, 
financial, and other business firms 



c. Government (Federal. State, county, municipal, 
township, school district, etc.) 



d. Other classes (Specify) 



e. TOTAL iSum of lines a through d) 



Percentage 

of receipts Ke * 



9, PAYROLL AND EMPLOYMENT 



Employees and payroll by 
occupation (include 
proprietors and partners on 
line b only) 

(1) Associate lawyers 



(2) Secretaries (stenographe 
and typists) 



(4) TOTAL (Sum of line 
through (3)) 



(1) 



b. Number of proprietors 
and partners 



c. Of the lawyers (lines a(l) and 
b) how many were employed 
by the Federal government as 
attorneys during any part of 
the 5 years 1963-1967? 



Code 



82 



Number 
employed 

for week 

including 

March 12, 

1967 



Payroll for the first 
quarter of 1967 



XX 




10. EXPENSES (other than payroll) DURING 1967 



Line a — Employer contributions under the Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act (FICA), the Federal Unemployment Tax Act. any payments or allocations 
to other employee benefits such as State Temporary Disability and Workmen's 
Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, Health and Welfare, savings 
and deferred profits plans; and premiums for life, disability, sickness and 
medical insurance. 

Line b — Include all non-payroll costs of attendance at courses, seminars, 
meetings of professional societies, by lawyers of this firm including associate 
lawyers as well as partners and sole proprietors. Include indirect expenses 
such as cost of travel, lodging, books, etc.. as well as direct charges such as 
registrations, admissions, tuition. 

Line c — Total taxes, such as license fees, real estate and real property taxes, 
etc. payable during 1967. Do not include Federal or State taxes on payroll 
or taxable income. 

Line d— Report the amount as on your books , of depreciation in 1967 of 
buildings, fixtures, furniture, law libraries, vehicles, and other equipment. 

Line f— Include only direct payments for electricity, heating fuel and water. 
Line g — If the firm owns its own office space do not include equivalent 
office rent expense on this line. 

Line h — Operating expenses not reported elsewhere on this form, excluding 
interest on loans or other indebtedness. Include payments to other firms 
for rental of vehicles or other equipment; accounting, communications or 
other services; insurance, except for the account of employees. Also include 
amounts set aside for bad debt losses, the amount not compensated for by 
insurance from accidental loss or damage to capital, and losses by theft. 



Employer contributions to unemploy- 
ment insurance. FICA. pension, 
welfare, and other insurance plans 



b. Expenses incurred for professional 

advancement of staff lawyers (including 
all associate lawyers and partners) 



c. Taxes and license fees, except 
income and payroll taxes 



d. Depreciation 



e. Purchase of office supplies, 
stationery and postage 



f. Payments for electricity, 
heating fuel and water 



g. Office rent 



h. Other nonpayroll expenses not 
included elsewhere (exclude 
interest on loans) 



i. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through h) 



Key 



11. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (excluding land) IN 1967 

Capital expenditures refer to all costs actually incurred during 1967 which 
are chargeable to the fixed assets accounts of this firm, and are of the type 
for which depreciation accounts are normally maintained. These include 
expenditures during 1967 for buildings, fixtures, furniture, law libraries, 
vehicles, etc. (Do not deduct the value of trade-ins.) 



Key 



Total capital expenditures in 1967 for 
structures and related facilities, 
equipment and other depreciable 
assets 



12. YOUR OFFICE LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate law offices at more than one location unde 
the Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967?... 



1 D Yes 2 □ No 



b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your main office and 
including any facilities other than law offices which you may operate under the same E.I. Number. 



Address of location 
(Number, street, city or town. State. ZIP code! 



Description of operation 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Number of 
employees 
pay period 
including 
March 12. 1967 



Total employment for this Employer Identification Number 
(Total should equal the entry in item 9a(4)l 



This space may be used for any explanation that may be helpful in understanding 



13. 



CERTIFICATION 



FORM CB-81 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State. ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



Area code Number Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from . 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



177 



PINA1TY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67U6 



k*m CB-89 

(8900) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES 

ARCHITECTURAL AND ENGINEERING FIRMS 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

Please complete and return this form in the envelope provided. 

If you operated more than one establishment (location) under the same 
Employer Identification Number in 1967, entries on this report should 
be consolidated for all such locations except that in item 1, enter the 
location of your main establishment and in item 14 provide information 
separately for each location. 

If your Employer Identification Number (the number appearing on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941) was 
changed during 1967, submit a report for the entire period of operation 
in 1967 on one 1967 Census reporting form, and list all Employer 
Identification Numbers used during any part of 1967 in item 2. 

This report should cover the calendar year 1967 or, if records are 
maintained on a fiscal year basis, the report should cover the fiscal 
year which includes at least 10 months of 1967. 

If book figures are not available, enter your best estimates. 

If unusual circumstances should cause an undue burden in filing by the 
due date, or if you have any questions, please write to the Jefferson- 
ville Census Operations Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



NOTICE— Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
pleas* rotor to this Census FiU Number e^ 



CB-89 (8900) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



1. NAME AND LOCATION OF HOME OFFICE 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this firm 
is known to the public? 

D Yes □ No (If "No," enter firm name above the label.) 

b. Is the address shown the actual physical location of the 
home office of this company? 

a Yes a No 

If "No," enter below the number, street, city, State, and ZIP code 
of this firm's main office. 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION 

1 D Individual proprietor 

2 □ Partnership 

D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 D Other (Specify) 



Number and street 



City, village, or other place 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this firm on your latest 1967 Employer's 
Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



D Yes 



D No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits)) • 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 



Was this firm in business at the 
end of 1967? 

(NOTE: For firms which were inactive during 
December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time 
operations, answer "Yes," unless the firm was 
not owned at the end of the year.) 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this firm? 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



Months 



X-3X-* 



5. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS IN 1967 



Do not include nonoperating income such as interest, divi- 
dends, etc. 



Lines a(l), (2), and (3) — Fees for feasibility, economic, and 
other studies, reports, preparation of design and specifications, 
or other professional recommendations, and all other architec- 
tural, engineering or survey work done in 1967, whether or not 
payments were received in 1967. 



Lines b(4) and (5) — Gross receipts from general construction, 
special trade construction, and land development and improve- 
ment work done by this firm in 1967. 



Type of activity 



(1) Architectural 
services 



(2) Engineering 
services 



(3) Land surveying 



b. Other receipts: 

(4) Contract construction 



(5) Land development 
or improvement 



(6) Other — Specify 



(7) TOTAL (Sum of lines 
(1) through (6)) 



8-1 



Code 



82 



Firms not engaged in any 

contract construction 
or land development work 



Dollars 



| XX 



XX 



8-3* 



Firms engaged in 

contract construction 

or land development work 



Cents 



XX 



XX 



XX 
XX 



178 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-89-Con. 



6. TYPE OP SERVICE PROVIDED 

a. Mark the ONE line which best describes the principal service 
provided by this firm. 
8911018 D Architectural 
8911026 □ Engineering 
8911034 D Land surveying 
□ Other- Describe 



b. If this firm provides any type of engineering service, indicate below 
ALL specialized types which this firm performs. 

1 □ Civil 

2 D Soil and foundation 

3 □ Mechanical 

4 □ Electrical 

5 □ Structural 

6 D Chemical 

7 D Industrial 

8 D Mining and metallurgical 

9 D Other— Describe 



X-8' 



7. COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this firm is owned or controlled by another company 
and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identification Number 
of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box D if this firm owns or controls any other company or com- 
panies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identification 
Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



■ of company 



Mailing address (Number, street, city. State, 
ZIP code) 



EI No. (9 digits) 



8. TYPE AND LOCATION OF PROJECTS 

a. Estimated percentage of total fees by 
type of project. 



Type 



1. Single family dwellings 

2. Multi-family dwellings 

3. Commercial buildings 

4. Water supply and sanitation facilities... 

5. Industrial plant, processes and systems 

6. Roads, bridges, streets, railroads 

7. Civil airports 

8. Power generating and transmission 
facilities 

9. Flood control, drainage, navigation, 
rivers, and harbors 

10. Mining and metallurgical 

11. Other — Specify 



12. TOTAL ■ 



. Estimated percent of total fees earned for work 
on projects located outside the United States 
(i.e., outside the 50 States, District of Colum- 
bia, U.S. Commonwealth Territories or U.S. 
possessions). 



Percent of total fees 

(Item 5, lines 1, 

2, and 3) 



Key 



11 



12 



14 



1-6 



1-7 



1-10 



1-12 



ESTIMATED VALUE (AT COST) OF CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 
ON WHICH THIS FIRM DID DESIGN WORK IN 1967 



Project where firm was 
PRIME CONTRACTOR 

Estimated value of projects on which this 
firm acted as the prime contractor. 



b. Project where firm was 
SUB-CONTRACTOR 

Estimated value of those parts of projects 
on which this firm did design work on a 
sub-contract from the prime design 
contractor. 



Dollars 



Cents 



Key 



2-2 



10. PAYROLL AND EMPLOYMENT 



PAID EMPLOYEES -In columns 
(1) and (2) report number of em- 
ployees on the payroll during the 
week specified, including those on 
sick leave, paid holidays, and paid 
vacation. Include salaried officers 
and executives of corporations. In- 
clude owners and partners of unincor- 
porated businesses in column (3) 
only. 

PAYROLL-Include all salaries, 
wages, commissions, bonuses, vaca- 
tion allowances, and the value of 
payments in kind, such as goods, 
lodging, food, and clothing. Include 
tips, gratuities, etc., received by 
your employees from others. Do not 
include payments to (or withdrawals 
by) owners or partners of unincor- 
porated businesses. 



(1) Licensed or registered 
engineers or architects 



(2) Other technically 
trained personnel 



(3) All other personnel 



(4) TOTAL (Sum of lines 
(1) through (3)) 



Week including March 12, 1967 



Number of 
paid employees 



Full time 
(1) 



Part time 
(2) 



Number of 
partners or 
proprietors 



b. Total ANNUAL payroll in 1967 before deductions 



8-5 



8 6* 



1st quarter 1967 payroll 



Full time 
(41 



Dollars 



Part time 
(5) 



Dollars 



Dolla 



Cents 



Key 



X-5XX 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



179 



FORMCB-89-Con. 



11. CLASS OF CLIENT 



1~8 I 81 



Type of client 



a. Government— Public agencies (Federal, Stale, and local including school boards or 
other agencies of government) 



82 



8-3* 



Estimated fees by type of client 

(Report either in dollars or as 

percent of total fees, item 5, 

lines (1), 12), and (3)) 



Cents 



Percent of 
total fees 



b. Private individuals (including personal work for farmers) 



c. Construction firms 



e. Engineers 



f. Business firms and farming 



g. Industrial firms 



XX 



h. Others — Specify 



12. EXPENSES (OTHER THAN PAYROLL) DURING 1967 



Line a — Employer contributions under the Federal Insurance Contributions 
Act (F1CA); (he Federal Unemployment Tax Act; any payments or allocations 
to other employee benefits such as State Temporary Disability and Workmen's 
Compensation, Unemployment Compensation, Health and Welfare, savings 
and deferred profits plans; and premiums for life, disability, sickness and 
medical insurance. 

Line b— Amounts paid for the professional advancement of members of this 
firm's staff, including attendance at seminars, meetings, and inspection tours. 
Line c — Total taxes, such as license fees, real estate and real property taxes, 
etc. payable during 1967. Do not include Federal or Stale taxes on payroll 
or taxable income. 

Line d — Report the amount as on your books, of depreciation in 1967 of 
buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, and other equipment. 

Line f— Include only direct payments for fuel power, and water used in 
your business. 

Line g— If the firm owns its own office space do not include equivalent 
office rent expense on this line. 

Line h — Report all nonpayroll expenses not reported elsewhere on this form, 
except interest on loans or other indebtedness. Include payments to other 
firms for rental of vehicles or other equipment; advertising, accounting, com- 
munications or other services; insurance, except for the account of employees. 
Also include amounts set aside for bad debt losses, the amount not com- 
pensated for by insurance from accidental loss, damage to capital, and losses 
by theft. 



a. Employer contributions to unemploy- 
ment insurance, FICA, pension, 
welfare, and other insurance plans 



b. Expenses incurred for professional 
advancement of staff 



c. Taxes and license fees (excluding 
income or payroll taxes) 



d. Depreciation 



e. Purchase of all types of office 
supplies, stationery and postage 

f. Payments for electricity.Tieating 
fuel and water used in your 
business 



g. Office, other space rental 



h. Other nonpayroll expenses not 
reported elsewhere (excluding 
interest on loans) 



i. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through h ) 



■xx 



XX 



Key 



3-1 



3-3 
34 
35 
3-6 
3-7 



3-8 
3-9 



13. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (EXCLUDING LAND) IN 1967 



Capital expenditures refer to all costs actually incurred during 1967 which 
are chargeable to the fixed assets accounts of this firm, and are of the type 
for which depreciation accounts are normally maintained. These include 
expenditures during 1967 for buildings, fixtures, furniture, vehicles, etc. 
(Do not deduct the value of trade-ins.) 



Total capital expenditures in 1967 
for structures and related facilities, 
equipment, and other depreciable as 



Dollars Cents 



Key 



14. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under 

the Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If *'Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your main location, 
at which architectural and engineering services are performed and all other locations regardless 
of the nature of the activity. 



1 □ Yes 



Address of busi 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State, ZIP code) 



Description of busin 



Annual payroll 



Number of 
employees 
{Pay period 
including 
March 12. 1967) 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number ■ 
(Total should equal the entry in item 10b) 



15. 



CERTIFICATION 



FORM CB-89 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. Slate, ZIP code) 



Telephone No. 



Irea code 



Number 



Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period fron 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



180 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-S67017 



FORM CB — XD 

(5504) 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

GASOLINE SERVICE STATIONS, OTHER AUTOMOTIVE 



PLEASE READ 

ACCOMPANYING INSTRUCTIONS 

BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 



1. NAME AND PHYSICAL LOCATION 

a. Is the name shown in the label the name by which this 
establishment is known to the public? 



□ Ye 



D No (If "No," enter trade 
name above the label.) 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law. your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report, 
pleas? refer to this Census File Number f" 



CB-XD(5504) 



Employer 
Identification No. 



b. Is the address in the label — 

1. D The mail address of your establishment but not 

the actual physical location. 

2. □ The mail address of your establishment (including number and 

street) which also is its actual physical location. 

3. □ Neither of the above (e.g. accountant's office). 

(NOTE: If you marked box 1 or 3. or number and street are 
not shown in the label, complete c, d, and e below. If you 
marked box 2. complete d and e below. I 

c. Enter following physical location information 



Number and street 



State 



City, village, or other place 



ZIP code 



(NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street give name 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town.) 

d. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located 



e. Is your establishment physically located within the boundaries of 
the city, village, or other place specified in the label or in "c"? 



1 □ Yes 



2 D No 



3. LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY I 

OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 □ Individual proprietor 

2 D Partnership 

□ Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 □ Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 D Other (Specify) 



X-l 



4. PERIOD OPERATED IN 1967 



a. Was this establishment in business 

at the end of 1967? 1 D Yes 2 D No 

(NOTE: For establishments which were inactive 

during December 1967 due to seasonal or part-time operations, 

answer "Yes," unless the establishment was not owned 

at the end of the year.) 



X-2 



b. How many months during 1967 did 
you own this establishment? 



Months 



X-3X 



2. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 



Is the Employer Identification (EI) Number printed in the address label 
the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 1967 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



□ Yes D No (If "No," enter the 
currently assigned EI 
Number here (9 digits)) ■ 



5. METHOD OF SELLING 

Mark the box which describes your principal method 
of selling. Do not mark more than one box. 

1 D Selling at this establishment 

2 □ Mail order (catalog selling) 

3 □ House-to-house (direct selling) 

4 □ Operating merchandise vending machines 



X-5 



6. DOLLAR VOLUME OF BUSINESS AND PAYROLL IN 1967 



Sales of merchandise and other 
receipts from customers 



Dolla 



Cents 



XX 



b. Does the entry in "a" include 
sales taxes and excise taxes 
collected from customers? 1 □ Yes 



2 D No 



If "No," how much did you 
forward to taxing agencies 
for such taxes? 



d. Total ANNl'AL payroll in 1967 
before deductions 



Doll 



Cents 



XX 



XX 



Key 



X-6 



X-7 



COMPANY AFFILIATION 

a. Mark this box □ if this business is owned or controlled by another 
company and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer Identifica- 
tion Number of owning or controlling company (if known). 

b. Mark this box □ if this business owns or controls any other company 
or companies and enter the name, mailing address, and Employer 
Identification Number of owned or controlled companies (if known). 



Name of company 



X-8 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, 
ZIP code) 



X-9* 



EI No. (9 digits) 



8. DEPARTMENT OR CONCESSION LOCATED IN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ANOTHER FIRM 

a. Is your business at this location conducted as a department or concession (such as automotive repair 

department in a gasoline service station) in an establishment operated by another firm? 

Mark "Yes," if customers normally consider your operation as part of the establishment operated 
by the other firm, or if your sales to customers are billed by that establishment. 



1-1 



1 D Yes 2 D No 



b. If "Yes," please enter the name and description 
(kind of business! of the establishment which is 
operated by the other firm 



Nan 



Kind of business 



CENSUS OF BUSINESS 



181 



FORM CB-XD-Con. 



9. DEPARTMENT OR CONCESSION LOCATED IN THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

a. Is an> department, concession, or business not owned by you, operated within tins establishment 
Mark "Yes," if there is any operation of others which customers normally consider part ol your 
establishment, or il you bill customers for sales of such department, concession, or business. 
1». It l *Yes," please complete a line for each. 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



1 2XX 



2XX 



23 



2-4 



2-5 



26* 



Name and address ol owner 
of department or concession 



Kind of business 

of department or 

concession 



Estimated 

sales during 
1967 



Are t hi- 
sales of this 
department 
included in 
item 6a? 



Is the pay- 
roll of this 
department 
included in 
ilembd? 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Dollars 



Ye 



No 



Nc 



10. YOUR BUSINESS LOCATIONS 

a. In 1967 did you operate your business at more than one location under the 
Employer Identification Number you had at the end of 1967? 

b. If "Yes," is marked above, separately list below each location, including your 
main selling location and facilities other than selling establishments 

(such as warehouses, central administrative offices, buying offices, etc.). 



1 D Yes 



2 D No 



Address of business 
(Number, street, city or town, county. State, ZIP code) 



Description of business 



Census 
Use 
Only 



Sale 



Dollars 



Cents 



Number of 

paid employees 

(Pay period 

including 

March 12) 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



Totals for this Employer Identification Number 

(Sales total should equal the entry in item 6a) 



XX 



11. KIND OF BUSINESS 



1-5 



a. If one of the following titles adequately describes 
your kind of business, place a "1" on that line and 
make no entries on the other lines. If no one title 
describes your business adequately, place a "1" next 
to the title which indicates your most important 
activity, a "2" next to the second most important, 
etc. 



5541008 _ 
5511019. 
5521000- 
9000001 _ 
9000001 _ 
5531017- 

5531025- 
5933015, 

5933023- 
5599014_ 
5599014 . 
5592001 - 
5592001- 
5591003. 
5984000. 
5983002. 
5252002. 
7535008. 



.Gasoline service station 

.Passenger car dealer (franchised) 

.Passenger car dealer (nonfranchised) 

-Truck and truck tractor dealer 

.Petroleum bulk plant 

- Dealer in new tires, batteries, 
and accessories 

-Home and auto supply store 

.Dealer in used tires, batteries, 
and accessories 

.Auto wrecker 

_ Motorcycle, motor scooter dealer 

_ Aircraft dealer 

. Mobile home dealer 

_ Household trailer dealer 

-Boat dealer 

_ LP gas dealer 

.Fuel oil dealer 

_ Farm equipment dealer 

_ Automotive painting shop 



12. MERCHANDISE LINES-Report the dollar volume or the percent of sales of each of the listed 
merchandise lines. Estimated figures are acceptable. If it is not feasible to determine or estimate 
amounts for minor lines (i.e. any accounting for less than one percent of your total sales), mark IX) 
in column (3) on such lines. 

Make sure there is an entry in columns (1), (2). or (3) for every line for which you had any sales. 
NOTE: Entries on the following lines should exclude sales from vending machines owned 
by others. You may report either in dollars or as a percent of total. 



Merchandise lines 



(1) 



(2) 



Estimated sales 
during 1967 



Dollars 



(3) 



Sales 
less 
than 



(4) 



Cen- 
sus 
Use 

Only 



Automotive fuels and lubricants 



a. Gasoline 



b. Other automotive fuels (including diesel) 



c. Motor oil, greases, other automotive lubricants 



d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through c) 



401 



402 



403 



400 



Automobile tires, tubes, batteries, accessories, parts 



a. Parts — installed in repair work 



b. Parts — retail (over the counter) 



c. Automobile tires, tubes, batteries, accessories 



d. TOTAL iSum of lines a through c) 



3. Cigars, cigarettes, tobacco (exclude sales 
from vending machines owned by others) 



4. Groceries, other food items for preparation and 
consumption away from this establishment 
(including candy, bottled and canned soft drinks) 



5. Meals, snacks, sandwiches, nonalcoholic beverages 
generally served for consumption at this establishment 



6. Fuels (coal and wood. oil. LP gas), ice 



421 



423 



424 



420 



100 



020 



040 



480 



182 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CB-XD-Con. 



7539109. 

7539208. 
7534001_ 
7531007. 
7539307, 
7539406. 
7539505. 
7539505. 
7538002. 
7542202. 
7542103- 
7539703. 
7539604_ 



.Battery and ignition service shop 

_ Radiator service shop 

_ Tire recapping and retreading shop 

_Top, body, and frame repair shop 

.Automotive glass shop 

.Brake service shop 

.Axle, spring repair shop 

_Wheel alignment service shop 

.General auto repair shop 

_ Self-service car wash 

-Custom car wash 

.Automatic transmission repair shop 

.Muffler replacement, exhaust 
system repair shop 

.Other kind of business 
(Describe kind) 



b. Is this establishment a 
petroleum bulk plant with 
above ground storage tanks 
having a capacity of 10,000 
gallons or more? 



c. Does this establishment 
regularly perform general 
auto repair services (other 
than lubrication and minor 
adjustment)? 



d. Does this establishment 
regularly lease or rent 
passenger cars or trucks? 



e. Do most of the customers of 
this establishment pump their 
own gasoline? 



f. Does this establishment have 
coin-operated car wash 
equipment on the premises? 



g. Number of gallons of 
gasoline sold during 1967 



h. Number of gallons of other 
automotive fuels (including 
diesel) sold during 1967 



How many gasoline pumps 
are operated for sale of 
gasoline to customers? 



j. Number of rental units 
(rooms or cabins), operated 
by you at this location on 
December 31, 1967 



Yes No 



Number 



Key 



>1 6 



17 



1-9 



1-10 



1-11 



1-12* 



7. Sporting and recreational equipment, boats, bicycles, 
luggage, hunting, fishing, camping equipment 



300 



Automobiles, trucks, other powered road vehicles 



a. Motorcycles, motor scooters 



b. All other merchandise on line 8 



c. TOTAL (Sum of lines a and b) 



9. Packaged liquor, wine and beer 



10. Hardware, tools, electrical supplies, 
gardening equipment and supplies 



11. Cosmetics, drugs, health, first aid and sickroom 
needs, toiletries, dentifrices, soaps and 
detergents, household cleansers 



12. Farm equipment, machinery 



13. Hay, grain, feed, fertilizer, farm supplies 



14. Alcoholic drinks (served at this establishment) 



15. Major household appliances, radio, TV, record players, tape 
recorders, records, tapes, sheet music, musical instruments 



16. Kitchenware, small electric appliances, china, 
glassware, lamps, lamp shades, mirrors, 
pictures, and other home furnishings 



17. Lumber, millwork, building materials, paints, heating and 
plumbing equipment, home repair and modernization equipment 
and supplies (include major appliances on line 15 — not here) 



18. Men's and boys' clothing and furnishings (exclude 
footwear; all footwear should be reported on line 20) 



19. Jewelry, watches, clocks, silverware, optical goods 



20. All footwear 



21. Curtains, draperies, bedsheets, blankets, linens, 
piece goods, patterns, laces, trimmings, notions, 
closet accessories, blinds, window shades 



22. All women's and girls' clothing and accessories, 
infants' and children's wear, etc. (exclude footwear; 
all footwear should be reported on line 20) 



23. Furniture, sleep equipment, floor coverings 



24. All other merchandise (photographic equipment 
and supplies, toys, books, magazines, newspapers, 
stationery, baby carriages, etc.) 



(If sales of merchandise on this line is more than 
10% of total, specify principal lines) 



389 



391 



380 



080 



320 



120 



440 



460 



060 



220 



260 



340 



140 



280 



180 



200 



160 



240 



500 



25. 



All nonmerchandise receipts from customers 
(Include receipts from carrying charges and all other charges to cus- 
tomers for credit. Also include all receipts from customers for installa- 
tion, delivery, repair, maintenance, on-site construction, and rental 
of tools and equipment.) If sales and excise taxes are not included 
in the entries on lines 1-24, include them with other nonmerchandise 
receipts on line 25d. 



a. Service labor 



b. Coin-operated car wash receipts 



c. Rental or lease of automobiles or trucks 



d. All other nonmerchandise receipts 



e. TOTAL (Sum of lines a through d) 



26. TOTAL (Lines 1 through 25 -should equal 
sum of figures in items 6a and 6c.) 



527 



536 



539 



537 



520 



540 



13. 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone No 



Area code 



Number 



Extension 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from_ 



Signature of authori/.ed person 



Title 



Date 



FORM CB-XD 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



183 



FORMCBC-1T 

(For all firms with 100 or more employees and some firms with 4-99 employees) 



This report is doe by 



Budgel Bureau No. ■I1-6J103; Approval Expires December 31, 1966 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the 
same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by 
swom Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law 
also provides that copies retained' in your files are immune from legal process. 



ADVANCE REPORT 

CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

A separate Census report should be submitted for each of your "construction 
establishments" which operated during any part of 1965- A "construction 
establishment" is defined as a relatively permanent office or other place of 
business, at which or from which the usual business activities related to con- 
struction are conducted. Separate reports are not required for each project 
site. Information on individual projects should be included in the report for 
the "establishment" responsible for the project. Write for additional report 
forms if needed. Reasonable estimates or approximations are acceptable if 
book figures are not available. The report should only cover domestic opera- 
tions (tie 50 States and the District of Columbia). 



correspondence pertaining to this report please refer to the I |-digit file 
nber below. (Please copy this number on green file copy) 



(PLEASE RETURN THIS COPY) 



Review the entire questionnaire and also read the Instruction Manual before 
completing this report. 



I. IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION 



| 0-11 



A. Name of this establishment 



B. Actual PHYSICAL LOCATION of this establishment as of December 31, 1965 
{NOTE: May be different from mailing address) 



Street and number 



Place (City, row 



County 



C. Identification number 

Enter the identification number used for this establishment on Employer's Quar 
Federal Tax Return (U.S. Treasury Department Form 94 I )_ 



7 



(A joii 

project by I 



. Joint ventures 

venture is a separate legal entity formed to undertake a specific construction 
more firms —at least one of which is a construction firm.) 



(1) Was this business itself a joint < 
1 □ Yes - // "Yes"- 



i during 1965? 



Please enter in the Explanation Section (item 14) the na 
sponsoring and participating firms. 



b. Also read carefully the separate instructions relating l 
reporting of joint venture activity. 



2d No 
/ 



(2) Did this establishment or the bus iness owning or controlling this establishment 
sponsor or participate in any joint ventures in construction during 1965? 
(Businesses which only undertook subcontract work for the joint venture should 
check ■'No.") 



| "Yes. engaged in separate joint- ventures in whi< 
this business served as sponsor. 



2 1 1 *Yes. engaged in separate joint ventures in which 
this business participated but did not sponsor. 



How 



3 j ' No, did not sponsor or participate in any joint ventures during 1965. 



If "Yes" is checked read carefully the separate instructions relating to the proper 
reporting of joint venture activities. 



D. Legal form of ownership at end of 1965 
(Check one box) 

1 | [ Individual proprietor 

2 | ; Partnership — Specify number of working partne 

3 1 1 Corporation 

A □ Other - Specify 



G. Company affiliation at end of 1965 



(1) Was this business owned or controlled by another company 
on December 31. 1965? 



iDYes 



2[]No- Skip to C(2) 



: of owning or controlling company 



E. Changes in ownership or operation of this establishment during 1965 
(Check the appropriate boxes below) 



Mailing address 



1 d Purchased during 1965 



Employer Identification Number (If known ) 



Name of former owner 



(2) Did this business own or control any other company or companies 
on December 31, 1965? 



3Q Yes 



4 □ No - Skip to H 



2 □ Sold during 1965 



Name of company owned or controlled 



Name of purchaser 



Mailing address 



Employer Identification Number (If known) 



3 □ Went out of business during 1965 



4 fj^l Was reorganized (change in legal form of 
ownership) during 1965 



5 Q^ Started as a new business during 1965 
(No previous owner) 



H. Other establishments 

Did this company operate in 1965 any OTHER establishments (other than 
the one reported in item I B) under the Employer Identification Number 
reported in item 1C? 



idYes 



2 □ No - Skip to item 2 



6 [^ Was inactive for entire year 

7 □ No change during 1965 



Enter in item 14, page 4, nomefs) and address(es) of all such other 
establishments and a brief description of fheir kind of business. 



USCOMM-DC 



184 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORMCBC-1T-Con. 



2. KIND OF BUSINESS 



A, Describe the kind of business activities this establishment (identified in the address box) was engaged in during 1 965. 



B. Review all following descriptions. Place a " I " in the box next to the description which indicates this establishment's most important kind of business in 1 965 (based 
on total business receipts). If this establishment engaged in other kinds of business during I965. place a ,, 2" in the box next to the second most important kind. Place 
a "3" next to the third most important kind of business. Then place a check mark next to all other descriptions that describe other kinds of business engaged in by 
this establishment during 1 965. I 1-2 



Building construction < 



i GENERAL CONTRACTOR (building on the land of others) 



^) General Building Contractor (general contractor engaged in residential, industrial, commercial, educational, 
religious, institutional and other buildings) 

Building construction as an OPERATIVE, MERCHANT, OR INVESTMENT BUILDER (building on own land for sale, 
lease, or rental) 

f | Operative or Merchant Bui Ider (for sale to others) 
1 Investment Builder (for lease or rental to others) 

Heavy construction or engineering construction as a GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

| Highway and Street Contractor (general contractor engaged in construction of parking areas, airports, sidewalks, and light 
construction work for water and sewer projects incidental to street construction) 

^] Other Heavy Construction Contractor (general contractor engaged in construction of bridges, elevated highways, 
tunnels, dams, pipelines, industrial furnaces and other industrial appurtenances, marine construction, etc.) 

SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTOR {NOTE; General Contractors who incidentally perform some of these trades under 

their genera! contract should not make entries in these boxes unless they also accepted this work as special trade contractors in 1965.) 



^] Acoustical contractor 

| Air conditioning contractor 
~] Carpentry contractor 

| Concrete contractor 

| Dry wall contractor 

| Electrical contractor 

| Elevator and escalator contractor 

| Excavation and grading contractor 

| Floor covering (except wood) 
contractor 

1 Flooring (wood) contractor 
^Foundation contractor 

LAND DEVELOPER 

| Developer of own land for sale to others 

BUSINESS ACTIVITIES OTHER THAN CONSTRUCTION 

^] Architectural or engineering 
services for others 

| Finance or mortgage banking 
[~~~1 Insurance 

1 Legal service 
I | Manufacturing — Specify kind 



| Glass and glazing contractor 

| Heating contractor 

| Insulation contractor 

| Landscape contractor 

] Lathing and/or plastering 
contractor 
| | Masonry and/or stone setting 

contractor 
| | Ornamental metal work contractor 
[ | Painting, paperhanging contractor 
| j Paving contractor 
~|~j Plumbing contractor 



| Developer of land owned by others 



| Real estate 
| Rental of construction 
equipment to others 
I 1 Retail trade - Specify kind 



I 1 Residential remodeling contractor 

I""! Roofing contractor 

[~31 Sheet metal contractor 

I | Siding contractor and/or applicator 

I I Structural steel erection contractor 

| | Terrazzo. ceramic tile, marble, 

and mosaic contractor 
L3) Water well drilling contractor 
[^Wrecking and demolition contractor 
I 1 Other - Specify 



I I Wholesale trade - Specify kind 



I I Other -Specify 



| Transportation 



3. SUPPLEMENTAL QUESTION FORBUILDERS 

(Only for those establishments which made an entry in the 
Operative or Merchant Builder box or Investment Builder 
box in Item 2B above.) 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder during 1965, did this 
establishment always act as its own general contractor? 



1 □ Yes - Skip to item 4 



2 | | No 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder during 1965, did thi: 
establishment always employ general contractors? 



I | Yes - Skip to item 4 



2{~~JNo 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder during 1965, what percent was 
given out to general contractors? 



1 □ Less than 25% 

2 □ 25 - 49% 



3 □ 50 - 74% 

4 □ 75 - 99% 



4. RESIDENTIAL HOUSING STARTS (NOTE: All housing units in a 

residential building are considered as started when excavation is started for 
the footings or the foundation of the building. 



Did this establishment — operating as a builder acting as its own general contractor 
or operating as a general contractor — start in 1965 any new buildings that 
contained residential housing units? Do not include group quarters; such as, 
dormitories, hotels, and motels. 

1 □ Yes - Complete A, B, and C below 2 □ No - Skip to item 5 



A, Single-family houses 

(include row or town houses) 



Number of — 



Single-fami ly 
houses 



5. NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 



Report all paid employees (permanent and temporary, full-time and part-time) of 
this establishment. Exclude subcontractors and their employees. Also exclude 
proprietors and partners. 



A - Construction Workers Employees including journeymen, mechanics, 

apprentices, machine operators, laborers, inspectors, truck drivers and helpers, 

and on-site record keepers and watchmen, and others engaged directly in construction 

operations and supervisors up through the working foreman level. 



B _ All Other Employees All other employees such as salaried managers 

and directors, supervisors above the working foreman level, and all others engaged 
in the administrative, technical, and office work of the establ ishment. 



C _ Total Number of Employees 



Type of employees 



A. Construction workers 



Number of employees of this establishment during the pay 
period including the 12th of: 



February 
1965 



May 
1965 



August 
1965 



Novembe 
1965 



B. In 2- to 4-family residential buildings 



B. All other 
employees 



Housing units 



C. In apartment buildings with 5-or-more 
housing units 

FORMCBC-1T (12*22-66) 



C. TOTAL — 
(Sum of line 
A and B) 



Page 2 



USCOMM-DC 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



185 



FORM CBC-1T-Con. 



IMPORTANT: For items 6 — II, please report dollar figures rounded to the nearest thousands. However, if you 
preferyou may report to the nearest dollar. In either case, be careful to enter your figures in the correct columns. 
See example at right. Be sure to complete every item. Enter "0" if there is no dollar entry for on item. 


EXAMPLE 
If the payroll is 
$1,125,628.28: 

Preferred method +- 


Mil- 
lions 


Thou- 
sands 


Dol- 
lars 


Cents 




000 


000 


000 


XX 


S 1 


126 




XX 


S 1 


125 


628 


XX 




6. PAYROLLS 

Enter the total (before deductions) of wages, salaries, bonuses, and commissions paid in I965 to "construction workers** and "all 
other employees" of this establishment. (Exclude payments to owners or partners of unincorporated businesses.) 

A. Construction workers (See definition in item 5A) 


Mil- 
lions 


Thou- 
sands 


Dol- 
lars 


Cents 




S 






XX 


2-1 


B. All other employees (See definition in item 5B) 


S 






XX 


2-2 




S 






XX 


2-3 




7. COST OF CONSTRUCTION WORK LET OUT BY THIS ESTABLISHMENT TO OTHER CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS 

Enter payments made during I965 for such contracting, including payments made to both subcontractors and general contractors. (Do not 
include here payments made by this establishment for its purchases of materials, components, and supplies. Report these payments in 
item 8. Also do not include here payments made for the rental of construction machinery or equipment. Report these payments in 
item 9.) 


$ 






XX 


2-4 


8. TOTAL COST OF MATERIALS, COMPONENTS, AND SUPPLIES 

Enter the total payments made by this establishment during I 965 for its purchase of all materials, components, and supplies. Do not 
include payments for subcontract construction let out to others and already reported in item 7. Do not include payments for land or 
for the rental of construction machinery or equipment. 


$ 






XX 


2-5 


9. RENTAL OR LEASING OF MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

Enter the total payments made by this establishment during [965 for the rental or lease of construction machinery and equipment, 
transportation equipment, production equipment, and office equipment, furniture and fixtures. (Do not include payments for subcontract work.) 


$ 






XX 


2-6 


10. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (Exclude lond) 

Capital expenditures include all costs which ore chargeable to the fixed assets accounts of this establishment and for which 
depreciation accounts are ordinarily maintained. 

A, Report the total capital expenditures of this establi shment during 1965. Include capita! expenditures for new and used structures, 
additions, and related facilities and new and used construction machinery and equipment, transportation equipment, production 
equipment, and office equipment, furniture and fixtures. 


$ 






XX 


2-7 


B. How much of the amount reported in A above covered plant or equipment produced by this same establishment? (If none enter "0") 


s 






XX 


2-8 


C. How much of the amount reported in B above is also being included in the figures reported in 1 1 below? 
1 □ None 2 □ Some 3 □ All 










2-9 


11. BUSINESS RECEIPTS DURING 1965 (Exclude receipts from operations in foreign countries.) 

A. Total business receipts of this establishment during 1965. Report all sales and other receipts from this establishment's business 
operations. Exclude nonoperating income; such as, interest, dividends, etc. Exclude construction loans. 


s 






XX 


3-1 


B. Construction receipts —Of the amount reported in 1 |A, approximately how much represents receipts during 1965 from 
construction activities? 

Include all construction receipts from general contracting, special trades contracting, land development and land 
improvement work. Also include receipts from the sales of buildings and other structures built for sale (excluding from 
these receipts all value of the land but including the value of any improvements this establishment made to the land). 
Exclude receipts for architectural and engineering work. 


s 






XX 


3-2 


C. Receipts from land -- Of the amount reported in 1 IA. approximately how much represented receipts during 1965 
from land sales? 
Exclude the value of improvements and land development reported in 1 1 8 above. 


$ 






XX 


3-3 


D. Business receipts during 1965 from other than B and C above. 

Include the business receipts of this establishment (not from separate businesses or separate establishments) which were obtained 
from other activities such as architectural and engineering work, retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment, service trades, 
manufacturing, transportation, legal service, insurance, finance, rental of property or other real estate operations, and other 
n on construction activities not included in 11B and 11C above. 


J 






XX 


3-4 


NOTE; The total of the amounts reported on lines 1 1B, llC,and 11 D should equal the amount for 11 A. 



FORMCBC-1T (I2-22-8B) 



USCOMW-DC 



186 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORMCBC-IT-Con. 



12. CLASSIFICATIONS OF CONSTRUCTION WORK 

NOTE: Each of items I2A, I2B. I2C. 1 2D. and 1 2E asks for an estimated percentage breakdown of the Construction Receipts figure reported on line I I B in the previous iterr 



A. Types of construction work this establishment engaged in during 1965 

On each of the lines below enter your best estimate of the percent of 
this establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in i 965 
by types of projects listed. 

Enter a "0" if this establishment did not engage in the type work 
listed for a line. 



4-1 



Type of projec 



Single-family houses 

Multi-family {containing 2-or-more housing units) 
residential buildings including apartment houses 

Other residential buildings (hotels, motels, and dormitories) 

Industrial buildings 

Office buildings and warehouses 

Stores, restaurants, and garages 

Religious buildings . 

Educational buildings 

Hospital and institutional buildings 

Other nonresidential buildings — Specify 

Highway and street construction 

Bridges, tunnels, and elevated highways 

Marine construction, harbor and waterways construction, 
and conservation and development projects 



Public utility construction (power and communication 
transmission lines and towers, sewers and water mains, gas 
mains and pipelines, local transit and railroad construction) . 



Other heavy construction (military and space facilities, heavy 
industrial and mining appurtenances which are constructed 
at the site, etc.) 



Other types of construction work— Specify 



TOTAL CONSTRUCTION RECEIPTS 



Percent of 

total 

construction 

receipts 



(CONTINUE WITH 12B IN NEXT COLUMN) 



B. Location of construction work in 1965 



(1) Was all of the construction work of this establishment for 1965 
located within the State reported in IB? 



TTT 



1 Q^ Yes - Skip to item 12C 

2QNo 
/ 
(2) Indicate each State in which this estobl ishment engaged in construction 
work and enter your best estimate of the percent of construction receipts 
accounted for in 1965 by the work in each State. 

(If more space is required use another sheet or paper and attach it 
to this report.) 



Total construction receipts 



C. Ownership of construction projects (public or private) 

Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent of 
this establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in 
1965 by work on publicly owned projects and privately owned projects. 
(Public construction includes projects owned by Federal, State, or local 
governments -- including public authorities and special districts.) 



Public construction 

Private construction 

Total construction receipts . 



D. Class of construction 

Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent of this 
establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in 1965 by the 
following classes of construction: 



New construction (including additions and alterations) 

Maintenance and repair work 

Total construction receipts ■■ ■ ■ ■ 



E. Work done by this establishment for other construction contractors 
or for builders 

(1) Did this establishment obtain receipts during 1965 for work done for othe 
contractors or builders? 

1 [~1 Yes - Complete E(2) below 

2 Q] No - Skip to item 13 



(2) Approximately what percent of this establishment': 
total construction receipts was accounted for 
by such work? 



13. CHECKS TO ASSURE A COMPLETE AND ACCURATE REPORT 



| 6-4 



The Census Bureau reviews your report for omiss ; ons. inconsistencies, and 
unusual entries. T save both you and the Government costly correspondence 
about such problems, please make the following checks before returning your, 
completed report. 

A. Review the report carefully to see that you have not omitted answers 
to any items. 

B. Do the reported percentages add to 100% in items I2A, I2B, I2C, and 120? 

C. Is the total for Business Receipts (item I |A) greater than the sum for 
Payrolls (item 6) plus Cost of Construction Work Let Out to Other 
Construction Contractors (item 7) plus the Total Cost of Materials, 
Components, and Supplies (item 8)? 

1 □ Yes - Skip to item 15 

2 | [ No — Review those entries for reasonableness and revise them if in 

error. If entries are correct indicate th : s in the Explanation Secti> 



14. EXPLANATION SECTION 

(Use this space for additional explanation regarding the data reported for this 
establishment. If more space is required use another sheet of paper and attach it 
to this report.) 



15. Name of person to contact regarding this report Address (Number and street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Telephone 



Area code Numbei 



16. CERTIFICATION - This report is substantially accurate and has been prepared in accordance with instructions 



Period covered 



Signature and title 



FORM CBC-1T (12-22-65) 



Page 4 



JSCOMM-DC 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



187 



FORM CBC-2T 

(For all firms with 1-3 employees and some firms with 4-99 employees) 



Budget Bureau No. 41-65103; Approval Expires December 31, 1966 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same law, your report to the Census Bureau is 
confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also pro- 
vides that copies retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE This report is due by: 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



ADVANCE REPORT 

CENSUS OF BUSINESS 

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

A separate Census report should be submitted for 
each of your "construction establishments" which 
operated during any part of 1965. A "construction 
establishment" is defined as a relatively permanent 
office or other place of business, at which or from 
which the usual business activities related to con- 
struction are conducted. Separate reports are not 
required for each project site. Information on in- 
dividual projects should be included in thereport 
for the "establishment" responsible for the project. 
Write for additional report forms if needed. Reason- 
able estimates or approximations are acceptable if 
book figures are not available. The report should 
only cover domestic operations (the 50 States and 
the District of Columbia). 



In correspondence pertaining to this report please refer to the | I -digit file 
number below. (Pteaae copy this number on green file copy) 



YOUR FILE COPY 



Review the entire questionnaire and read the Instruction Manual before 
completing this report. 



1. KIND OF BUSINESS | 1-1 

A. Describe the kind of business activities this establishment (identified in the address box above) was engaged 
in during 1965. 



TT£ 



B. Check the box or boxes below which best describe the kinds of business this establishment was engaged 
in during 1965. 

Building construction os a GENERAL CONTRACTOR (building on the land of OTHERS) 

^j General Building Contractor (general contractor engaged in residential, industrial, commercial, educational, 
religious, institutional and other buildings) 

Building construction as an OPERATIVE, MERCHANT, OR INVESTMENT BUILDER (building on OWN 
land for sale, lease, or rental) 

| 1 Operative or Merchant Builder (for sale to others) 
| Investment Builder (for lease or rental to others) 

Heavy construction or engineering construction as a GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

I Highway and Street Contractor (general contractor engaged in construction of parking areas, airports, 
sidewalks, and I ight construction work for water and sewer projects incidental to street construction) 

I 1 Other Heavy Construction Contractor (general contractor engaged in construction of bridges, elevated highways, 
tunnels, dams, pipelines, industrial furnaces and other industrial appurtenances, marine construction, etc.) 

SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTOR (NOTE: General Contractors who incidentally perform some of these 
trades under their general contract should not make entries in these boxes unless they also accepted 
this work as special trade contractors in 1965.) 



| Acoustical contractor 

\ Air conditioning contractor 

j Carpentry contractor 
| Concrete contractor 
| Dry wall contractor 
| Electrical contractor 

Elevator and escalator contractor 

1 | Excavation and grading contractor 
| Floor covering {except wood) 
contractor 
| ' Flooring (wood) contractor 
| Foundation contractor 



^j Glass and glazing contractor 
j Heating contractor 
1 Insulation contractor 
I Landscape contractor 
1 1 Lathing and/or plastering 

contractor 
^Masonry and/or stone setting 

contractor 
^Ornamental metal work contractor 
| Painting, paperhanging contractor 
I I Paving contractor 
3~| Plumbing contractor 



| | Residential remodeling contractor 
~] Roofing contractor 

| Sheet metal contractor 
1 1 Siding contractor and/or applicator 
[ 1 Structural steel erection contractor 
| | Terrazzo, ceramic tile, marble, 

and mosaic contractor 
[ j Water well drilling contractor 
[ i Wrecking and demolition contractor 
I | Other-Specify 



LAND DEVELOPER 

□ Developer of own land for sale to others Q Developer of land owned by others 

BUSINESS ACTIVITIES OTHER THAN CONSTRUCTION 

I I Architectural or engineering ^| Real estate 

services for others r— j Renta| of construction 

I ' Finance or mortgage banking equipment to others 

1 | Retail trade - Specify kind 



Q Wholesale trade - Specify kind 



I Insurance 
' Lega I service 
I I Manufacturing - Specify kind 



I | Other - Specify kind 



| Transportation 



C. Indicate the kind of business activity that provided the greatest gross receipts during 1965 by circling ([•Hone of the 
boxes you have checked above. 



USCOMM-DC 



188 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CBC-2T-Con. 



2. IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION 



2. IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION - Continued 



A. Name of this establishment 



B. Actual PHYSICAL LOCATION of this establishment as of 
December 31, 1965-(NOTE: May be different from 
mail ing address.) 



Street and number 



Place (City, town, village) 



County 



C. Identification number 

Enter the identification number used by this establishment on 
Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return (U.S. Treasury 
Department Form 941). 



D. Legal form of ownership at end of 1965 
(Check one box) 



0-9 



.1 | | Individual proprietor 

2 | Partnership — Specify number of working partners 



3 1 I Corporation 

4 □ Other - Specify _ 



E. Changes in ownership or operation of this 
establishment during 1965 
(Check the appropriate boxes below) 



1 □ Purchased during 1965 



Name of former owner 



F. Joint Ventures (A joint venture is a separate legal entity 
formed to undertake a specific construction project by two 
or more firms — at least one of which is a construction firm.) 



(1) Was this business itself a joint 
venture during 1965? 

1 □ Yes * - Ski P to G (D 



0-11 



2CNo 



(2) Did this establishment or the business owning or 

controlling this establishment sponsor or participate in 
any joint ventures in construction during 1965? 
(Businesses which only undertook subcontract work for 
the joint venture should check "No.") 



□ Yes* 



CNo 



'If "Yes" is checked, read carefully the separate instructions 
relating to the proper reporting of joint venture activities. 



G. Company affiliation at end of 1965 

(1) Was this business owned or controlled by 
another company on December 31, 1965? 



0-12 



IE Yes 
\ 



2 □ No - Skip to G(2) 



Name of owning or controlling company 



Mailing address 



Employer Identification number (if known) 



(2) Did this business own or control any other company 
or companies on December 31, 1965? 



1 CI Ye 



2 d No - Skip to H 



Name of company owned or controlled 



Mai I ing address 



Employer Identification number (if known) 



H. Other establishments 

Did this company operate any OTHER establishments 
in 1965 (other than the one reported in 2B) UNDER 
THE EMPLOYER'S IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 
REPORTED IN 2C? 



0-13 



1 dye 
\ 



2 □ No - Skip to item 3 



Enter in the Explanation Section, item 10, the name(s) and 
address(es) of all other such establishments and a brief 
description of their kind of business. 



2 □Sold during 1965 



3. BUSINESS RECEIPTS DURING 1965 
from operations in foreign countries. 



Exclude receipts 



Name of purchaser 



A. Total business receipts of this establishment during 1965. 
Report all sales and other receipts from this establishment's 
business operations. Exclude nonoperating income; such as, 
interest, dividends, etc. Exclude construction loans. 



3-1 



3 [□ Went out of business during 1965 



4 (□ Was reorganized during 1965 



5 | | Started as a new business 

in 1965 (No previous owner) 



B. Construction Receipts — Of the amount reported in 3A, 

approximately how much represents receipts during 1965 fro 
construction activities? 

Include all construction receipts from general contracting, 
special trades contracting, land development and land 
improvement work. Also include receipts from the sales 
of buildings and other structures built for sale (excluding 
from these receipts all value of the land but including the 
value of any improvements this establishment made to the 
land). Exclude receipts for architectural and engineering 
work. 



3-2 



6 | Was inactive for entire yea 

7 [' 1 No changes 



FORM CBC-2T (12-20-65) 



Page 2 



USCOMM-DC 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



189 



FORM CBC-2T-Con. 



-QT 



4. CLASSIFICATIONS OF CONSTRUCTION WORK 



NOTE: Each of Hems A, B, C, and D asks for an estimated percentage breakdown of the Cons/rucr/on Receipts figure reported 
in item 3B. 



A. What type(s) of construction work did THIS 
ESTABLISHMENT engage in during 1965? 

(1) Enter check marks in the appropriate boxes below to 
indicate the types of projects worked on in 1965: 

"^Single-family houses 

^J Multi-family (containing 2-or-more 
housing units) residential buildings 
including apartment houses 

^]Other residential buildings 
(hotels, motels, dormitories) 

~] Industrial buildings 

^Office buildings and warehouses 

^ Stores, restaurants, and garages 

1 Religious buildings 

| Educational buildings 
^j Hospital and institutional buildings 

| Other nonresidential buildings — Specify 



j Highway and street construction 

| Bridges, tunnels, and elevated highways 

| Marine construction, harbor and 
waterways construction, and conservation 
and development projects 

___ Public utility construction (power and 
communication transmission lines and 
towers, sewers and water mains, gas mains 
and pipelines, local transit and railroad construction) 

I Other heavy construction 
(military and space facilities, heavy 
industrial and mining appurtenances which 
are constructed at the site, etc.) 

[ | Other _ Specify 



(2) Indicate the one type that provided the greatest 
amount of construction receipts by circling (t^H 
the appropriate checked box in 4A( I ) above. 



(3) What approximate percent of construction receipts 
did this one type account for in 1965? 

| | 100% 

□ 90 - 99% 

□ 70 - 89% 

□ 50 - 69% 
Q 30 - 49% 

I | Less than 30% 



B. Locotion of construction work in 1965. 



(1) Was all of the construction work of this establishment 
for 1965 located within the State reported in 2B? 



5-1 



1 Q Yes - Skip to item 4C 

2 Q] No - Complete item 4B(2) 



(2) Indicate each State in which this establishment 

engaged in construction work and enter the approximate 
percent of construction receipts accounted for in 1965 
by the work in each State. 

(If more space is required use another sheet of paper 
and attach it to this report.) 



5-2 



Total construction receipts 



C. Ownership of 



p of construction projects (public or private) 



Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent 
of this establishment's total construction receipts accounted 
for in 1965 by work on publicly owned projects and privately 
owned projects. (Public construction includes projects owned 
by Federal, State, or local governments — including public 
authorities and special districts.) 



Public construction 



Private construction 



Total construction receipts ■ 



m 



D. Class of construction 



Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent 
of this establishment's total construction receipts accounted 
for in 1965 by the following classes of construction. 



6-2 



New construction (including additions 
and alterations) 



Maintenance and repair work 



Total construction receipts • 



100 % 



FORM CBC-27 (12-20-05) 



Page 3 



USCOMM-DC 



190 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM CBC-2T-Con. 



5. CONTRACTING PRACTICES 



7. PAYROLL AND EMPLOYMENT 



A. Work done by this establishment for other 
construction contractors or for builders 



6-3 



(1) Did this establishment obtain receipts during 1965 for 
work done for other contractors or for builders? 

1 Q^j Yes - Complete A(2) below 

2[]No- Skip to 5B 



Enter the total (before deductions) of wages, salaries, 

bonuses, and commissions paid in 1965 to al! employees 

(includes construction workers and all other r- 

employees) of this establishment. 

(Exclude payments to owners or 

partners of unincorporated 

businesses.) 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



B, Report on the lines below all paid employees (permanent 
and temporary, full-time and part-time) of this establishment. 
Exclude subcontractors and their employees. Also exclude 
proprietors and partners. 



(2) Approximately, what percent of this establishment's 
total construction receipts was accounted for by 
such work? 



Type of employees 



B. Construction work let out by THIS ESTABLISHMENT 
to other construction contractors 



2-4 



(1) Did this establishment make any payments during 1965 
for work let out to others? 

1 \^J Yes - Complete B(2) below 

2QNo- Skip to 5C 



( 1 ) Construction 
workers 

(See instructions 
for definition) 



(2) All other 
employees 
(See instructions 
for definition) 



(3) Total 

(Sum of lines 
(l)and (2)) 



Number of employees of 

this establishment during the pay 

period including the 12th of: 



February 1965 



August 1965 



1-5 



1-6 



1-7 



(2) Indicate the payments made during 1965 for such 
work. (Do not include payments to material 
fabricators and suppliers, or 
lessors of construction 
machinery and equipment.) 



Dollars 



Cents 



C. Supplemental question for builders 

(Only for those establishments which checked the box(es) 
for Operative or Merchant Builder or Investment Builder 
in item I B on page I .) 



8. TOTAL COST OF MATERIALS, COMPONENTS, AND 
SUPPLIES Enter the total payments made by this 
establishment during 1965 for its purchases of all materials, 
components, and supplies. Do not include payments for 
subcontract construction let out to others 
and already reported in item 5B(2). 
Do not include payments for land 
or for the rental of construction 
machinery or equipment. 



2-5 



Dollars 



XX 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder 
during 1965, did this establishment always act as 
its own general contractor? 



1-3 



9. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES DURING 1965 (Exclude land) 

Capital expenditures include all costs which are chargeable 
to the fixed assets accounts of this establishment and for 

which depreciation accounts are ordinarily maintained. 



1 \^\ Yes - Skip to item 6 



2|Z]No 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder during 
1965, did this establishment always employ general 
contractors? 



Did this establishment make any capital expenditures during 
1965 for new machinery and new equipment; new structures, 
additions, and related facilities; or used structures, 
machinery, and equipment? 



1 Q Yes - Skip to item 6 



2QNo 



1 QH Yes _ Complete B below 

2 □ No - Skip to item 10 



| 2-9 



For the construction work undertaken as a builder during 
1965, what percent was given out to general contractors? 



B. Report the total capital expenditures 
(excluding land) of this establishment 
during 1965 



UL 



Dollars 



Cents 



XX 



1 □ Less than 25% 

2 □ 25 - 49% 



3 □ 50 - 74% 

4 □ 75 - 99% 



10. EXPLANATION SECTION 

(Use this space for additional explanation regarding the data 
reported for this establishment. If more space is required use 
another sheet of paper and attach it to this report.) 



6. RESIDENTIAL HOUSING STARTS 

NOTE: All housing units in a residential building are 
considered as started when excavation is started for the 
footings or the foundation of the building. 



Did this establishment—operating as a builder 
acting as its own general contractor or operating as 
a general contractor— start any new buildings in 1965 
that contained residential housing units? Do not include 
group quarters; such as, dormitories, hotels, and motels. 



11. Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



1 CZJYe 



Complete A,B,C 
below 



2| | No 



Skip to 
item 7 



Telephone 



Area code 



A. Single-family houses (include 
row or town houses) 



B. In 2- to 4-family 

residential buildings 



C. In apartment buildings with 
5-or-more housing units 



Single-family 
houses 



12. CERTIFICATION — This report is substantially accurate and 
has been prepared in accordance with instructions. 



Housing units 



Housing units 



Period 
covered 


From 


To 


Signature of authorized person 


Title 



FORM CBC-2T (12-20-65) 



Page 4 



USCOMM-DC 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



191 



PENALTY FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE: APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved; Budget Bureau No. 41-S67064 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Code). By th 

same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by 

sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also 



(0100) 



CC-1 



1967 CENSUS OF BUSINESS 
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY 



RETURN TO 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 
Jelfersonville, Indiana 47130 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 
Review questionnaire and read instruction Manual before completing report. 

Reasonable estimates or approximations are acceptable il book figures are 
not available. The report should only cover domestic operations (the 50 States 
and the District of Columbia). 

A separate Census report should be submitted for each of your "construction 
establishments" whicn operated during any part of 1967. A "construction 
establishment" is defined as a relatively permanent office or other place of 
business, at which or from which the usual business activities related to con- 
duction are conducted. Separate reports are not required for each project site. 
Information on individual projects should be included in the report for th 
"establishment" responsible for the p 



■ project. Write for additional report forms if needed, 
ews your report for completeness and consistency. 



ipCHl! 

The Census Bure 

To avoid costly and time consuming correspondence, please be sure to com- 
plete every item. Enter "0" in items 3 - 10 if appropriate. 

In all correspondence with the Census Bureau, please include the 11-digit 
Census File Number in the upper left of the address box. High speed electronic 



■quipment 



used to identify both 



esponde 



and reports. If yo 



pon'dence does not include the Census File Number, it will be returned to you 
for the addition of that number. Please enter this 11-digit number in the Census 
File No. space provided at the top of page 3. 



provides that copies retained in your file 



legal process. 



Employer 
Identification No. 



KEEP THIS COPY FOR YOUR FILES 

PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN THE FORM WHICH 
SHOWS YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS 



CENSUS 

USE 

ONLY-* 



18 19 



Key 



Item I - IDENTIFICATION INFORMATION 



A. NAME 

Is the name shown in the address box the name by which this 
this establishment is known to the public? 

□ Yes 

| No — Enter trade name: 



B. Actual PHYSICAL LOCATION of this establishment as of 

December 31, 1967. (NOTE: May be different from mailing address) 

Is the address originally printed in the address box the ACTUAL 
PHYSICAL LOCATION of this establishment? 

□ Yes QNo 

// "/Vo," or name and street are not shown in the address box, 
complete 1, 2, and 3 below. If "Yes," complete 2 and 3 below. 
1. Enter following physical location information 

b. City, village, or other place 



i. Number and street 



d. Zip code 



NOTE: If location cannot be described by number and street.give na 
or number of highway and approximate distance from nearest town. 

2. Enter name of county in which your 

establishment is located — . 



3. Is your establishment physically located 
within the boundaries of tjie city, village, 
or other place specified in the address 
box or in lb above? 



□ Yes 2QNo 



C. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

Is the Employer Identification (El) Number printed in the address 
box the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 
1967 Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form941? 



□ Yes 



□ No (It "No," enter 
the currently assigned 
EI No. here (9 digits)).* 



LEGAL FORM OF ORGANIZATION OF COMPANY [±1 

OPERATING THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

1 [ | | Individual proprietor 

2 ] " 1 Partnership 

(□ Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 

8 | _ | Co-op (cooperative association), corporate or noncorporate 

9 □ Other - Specify 



E. CHANGES IN OWNERSHIP OR ORGANIZATION OF THIS 

ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 (Check appropriate boxes below) 



j Purchased during 1967 — Enter name and address of fort 
owner, EI No. (if known), and month of purchase. 



Name and addresstNo., St., city, State, ZIP code} EI No. (It kn 



2 □ Sold during 1967 - Enter name and address of purchase 
El No. (if known), and month sold. 



i(No., St., city. State, ZIP code) EI No. (II known) 



3 1 | Went out of business during 1967 
(No new owner) 



A □ Reorganised during 1967 — Describe in 
item 13, e.g., "partnership change," or 
"change in corporate status." 



5 i | Slartcd as a new business during 1967 

(No previous owner) 

6 [ 1 Was inactive for entire year 

7 Q^i - S *° change during 1967 



JOINT VENTURES 

(A joint venture is a separate legal entity formed to undertake a specific 

construction project by two or more firms at least one of which is a 

construction firm.) 



1. Was this establishment itself a joint venture during 1967? J. 

1 QYes -If "Yes" - 

a. Please enter in the Explanation Section, item 13, the names 
of the sponsoring and participating firms. 

b. Also read carefully the separate instructions relating to the 
proper reporting of joint venture activity. 



2QNo 



x 7 



2. Did this estab/isfiment or the business owning or controlling this 
establishment sponsor or participate in any joint ventures in 
construction during 1967? 

(Businesses which only undertook subcontract work for a joint 
venture should mark "No.") 



l j | *Yes, engaged in separate joint ventures in 

which this business served as sponsor. 



2 I' '] *Yes, engaged in separate joint ventures in 
which this business participated but did 
not sponsor. 



How i 



3 I | No, did not sponsor or participate in any joint ventures 
during 1967. 



X-4 



X-6 



*/f "Yes" is checked read carefully the separate instructions relating 
to the proper reporting of joint venture activities. 



COMPANY AFFILIATION AT END OF 1967 

(Complete this item only if the Census File Number in the address box 
begins with "0".) 

1. Was the company operating this establishment owned or controlled 
by another company? 



I QYes 



7 



2 QNo -SKIP to G2 



Name of owning or controlling company 



EI No. (If known) 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



2. Did the company operating this estab/ishment own or control any 
other company or companies on December 31, 1967? 



I QYes 



7 



2 □ No - SKIP to G3 



X-8 



Name of company owned or controlled 



El No. (If known) 



Mailing address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



3. In 1967 did the company operating this establishment also 

operate any OTHER establishments (other than the one reported 

in item IB) under the Employer Identification Number indicated 
in item IC? 



□ Yc 



2 □ No - SKIP to item 2, page 2 



(Enter in item 13,'page 4,name(s) and oddress(es) of all such other 
establishments, a brief description of their kind of business, and 
their approximate 1967 payroll.) 



Continue with Item 2 on page 2 



192 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORMCC-l-Con. 



_Pafie2 



Item 2 - KIND OF BUSINESS 



A. Describe the kind of business activities this establishment (identified in the address box) was engaged in during 1967. 



B. Review all following descriptions. Place a "1" on the line next to the description which indicates this establishment's most important kind of 
business (based on total business receipts) in 1967. If this establishment engaged in other kinds of business during 1967, place a "2" on the 
line next to the second most important kind. Place a "3" next to the third most important kind of business. Then place a "X" mark next to 
all other descriptions that describe other kinds of business engaged in by this establishment during 1967. 



Building construction as a GENERAL CONTRACTOR (building on the land of others) 

01 General Building Contractor (general contractor engaged in the construction of residential, industrial, commercial, 

educational, religious, institutional and other buildings.) 

Building construction as an OPERATIVE, MERCHANT, OR INVESTMENT BUILDER (building on own land for sale, lease, or rental) 

02 Operative or Merchant Builder (for sale to others) 

03 Investment Builder (for lease or rental to others) 

Heavy construction or engineering construction as a GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

04 Highway and Street Contractor — Excluding Elevated Highways (general contractor engaged in construction of highways and streets, 

parking areas, airports, light construction work for water and sewer projects incidental to street construction, and work closely related 
to highway and street construction such as installation of guard rails, fences, and highway signs.) 

05 Other Heavy Construction Contractor (general contractor engaged in construction of bridges, elevated highways, heavy construction 

sewer and water projects, tunnels, dams, pipelines, marine construction, power projects, transmission lines, on site construction of 
industrial furnaces and other industrial appurtenances, etc.) 

SPECIAL TRADE CONTRACTOR (NOTE: General Contractors who incidently perform some of these trades under their general contract 
should not make entries in these boxes unless they also accepted this work as special trade contractors in 1967.) 



Acoustical contractor 

Air conditioning contractor 

Carpentry contractor 

Concrete contractor 

Dry wall contractor 

Electrical contractor 

Elevator and escalator contractor 

Excavation and grading contractor 

Floor covering (except wood) 

contractor 

Flooring (wood) contractor 

Foundation contractor 

LAND DEVELOPER 

Developer of own land 

for sale to others 



17 Glass and glazing contractor 

18 Heating contractor (except electric) 

19 Heating contractor, electric 

20 Insulation contractor 

21 Lathing and/or plastering 

contractor 

22 Masonry and/or stone 

setting contractor 

23 Ornamental metal work 

contractor 

24 Painting, pagerhanging contractor 

25 Paving contractor 

26 Plumbing contractor 



Developer of land 
owned by others 



27 Refrigeration contractor 

28 Residential remodeling contractor 

29 Roofing contractor 

30 Sheet metal contractor 

3! Siding contractor and/or applicator 

32 Structural steel erection contractor 

33 Terrazzo, ceramic tile, marble, and 

mosaic contractor 

34 Water well drilling contractor 

35 Wrecking and demolition contractor 

36 Other — Specify 



BUSINESS ACTIVITIES OTHER THAN CONSTRUCTION UNDERTAKEN BY THIS SAME ESTABLISHMENT 

85 Real estate 8£ 



Architectural or engineering 
services for others 

Finance or mortgage banking 

Insurance 

Legal service 

Manufacturing — Specify kind . 



86 Rental of construction 

equipment to others 

87 Retail trade — Specify kind - 



Transportation 

Wholesale trade — Specify kind 



7 



Other — Specify kind - 



Item 3 - RESIDENTIAL HOUSING STARTS 



A. Did this establishment during 1967 engage in the construction I 0~1 
of any new buildings that contained residential housing units? 

Do not include group quarters; such as, dormitories, hotels, 
and motels. 

I Q3 Yes — Complete B-^ 1 Q3 No — Go to item 4 on page 3 



C. To be completed only if at least one "Yes" box has been checked in item 38. 

How many residential buildings and housing units were started by or for 
this establishment as the general contractor or builder during 1967? 

NOTE: All housing units in a residential building are considered as 
started when the excavation is started for the footings or the foundation 
of the building. 



B. Did this establishment engage in the construction of these I 0-2 
residential housing units as a general contractor or operative, 
merchant or investment builder? 



7~] Yes — Acted as the general contractor 
for the owners. 



(Complete 3C) 



2 j | Yes — Was the operative, merchant or 
investment builder, building for 
sale, lease, or rental. 
(Complete 3C) 



3 Q^ No — Was not the general contractor or 

builder but participated in the 

work as a special trades contractor 

or subcontractor. 

(Go to item 4 on page 3) 



Type of 
residential building 



Single-family houses 
(include row or town houses) 



2- to 4-family 
residential buildings 



Apartment buildings with 
5-or-more housing units 



4 TOTAL (Sum of lines 1 to 3)- 



i with item 4 on page 3 



Number of 
buildings 
started 



Number of 
housing 

units 
started 



CENSUS OF CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES 



193 



FORM CC-1 -Con. 



Page 3 






Census File Number 
P/eose enter from oddre 


ss box on page 


■>- 








Item 4 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 

Report all paid employees (permanent and temporary, full-time Include salaried officers and executives, if a corporation. Do 
and part-time) on the payroll of this establishment during the pay not include proprietors or partners, if an unincorporated business. 
periods shown below. Include those on paid sick leave, paid Exclude subcontractors and their employees, 
holidays, and paid vacations, as well as those actually working. 


Type of employees 


Number of employees of this establishment during 
the pay period including the 12th of: 


Sum of 
columns 
(a) to (d) 

(el 


Average 
number 

of employees 

(Divide entry 

in column (e) 

by ■•4") 

(fl 


March 
1967 

(a) 


May 
1967 

(b) 


August 
1967 

(c) 


November 

1967 

fdl 


A. Construction Workers — (Such as painters, carpenters, plumbers, 
electricians, construction laborers, etc.) Include journeymen, 
mechanics, apprentices, equipment operators, laborers, truck 
drivers and helpers, and on-site record keepers and watchmen, and 
others engaged directly in construction operations and supervisors 
up through the working foreman level. 


I 1-1 


b^ 


1 1-3 


b^ 


h±. 


LjdL 


B. All other employees — All other employees such as employees 

engaged in the following activities: Executive, purchasing, account- 
ing, personnel, professional, and technical activities, routine office 
functions, and supervision above the working foreman level. 


Lhi_ 


^8_ 


Lul 


l_wo 




h-n* 




[M, 


[2±_ 


L«_ 


L^ 


l*±. 


LM 




IMPORTANT - For items 5-I0, please report dollar figures rounded to the nearest thousands. EXAMPLE 
However, if you prefer you may report to the nearest dollar. In either case, be careful to enter lf the payroll is 

your figures in the correct columns. See example at right *- *'« '25.628-28: 

,.«,, * , ■ , ,, , Preferred method _*. 

Be sure to complete every item. Enter if there is no dollar entry for an item. Acceptable method 


Mil- 
lions 


Thou- 
sands 


Dol- 
lars 


Cents 


Code 


000 


000 


000 


XX 


$ 1 


126 




XX 


S 1 


125 


628 


XX 


Item 5 - PAYROLLS 

Enter the total (before deductions) of wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and other remunerations paid in 
calendar year 1967 to "construction workers" and "all other employees" of this establishment. (Exclude 
payments to proprietors and partners of unincorporated businesses.) 

A. Construction workers (See definition in item 4A) 


Mil- 
lions 


Thou- 
sands 


Dol- 
lars 


Cents 


S 






XX 


2-7 


B. All other employees (See definition in item 4-B) 


s 






XX 


2-8 


C. TOTAL PAYROLL IN 1967 (Sum of lines A nnd B) -* 


s 






XX 


2-9* 


Item 6 - PAYMENTS MADE BY THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 FOR MATERIALS 
PURCHASED AND FOR CONSTRUCTION WORK LET OUT TO OTHERS 

A. Payments for construction work let out by this establishment to other construction contractors 

Enter payments made during 1967 for such contracting, including payments made to both subcontractors and 
general contractors. (Do not include here payments made by this establishment for its purchases of materials, 
components, and supplies. Report these payments in B below. Also do not include here payments made for 
the rental of construction machinery or equipment. Report these payments in item 7.) 


s 






XX 


3-1 


B. Payments for materials, components, and supplies 

Enter the total payments made by this establishment during 1967 for its purchase of all materials, components, 
and supplies. Do not include payments for subcontract construction let out to others and already reported in item 
6\ above. Do not include payments for land or for the rental of construction machinery or equipment. 


$ 






XX 


3-2 




s 






XX 


3-3 




Item 7 - PAYMENTS MADE FOR RENTING OR LEASING MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 

Enter the total payments made by this estoblishment during 1967 for the rental or lease of construction machinery 
and equipment, transportation equipment, production equipment, and office equipment, furniture and fixtures. (Do 
not include payments for subcontract work.) 


s 






XX 


3-4 


Item 8 - CAPITAL EXPENDITURES (Exclude land) 

Report on lines A to E below all capital expenditures of this establishment during 1967. (Capital expenditures 
include all costs which are chargeable to the fixed assets accounts of this establishment and for which deprecia- 
tion accounts are ordinarily maintained.) 

If you did not make any expenditure of the kind described, enter "0"' on line E. 

A. New structures, additions, and related facilities 


$ 






XX 


3-5 


B. New machinery and new equipment 


$ 






XX 


3-6 


C. Used structures and related facilities acquired from others 


s 






XX 


3-7 


D. Used machinery and used equipment acquired from others 


s 






XX 


3-8 




s 






XX 


3-9* 




Item 9 - TOTAL BUSINESS RECEIPTS DURING 1967 (Exclude receipts from operations in foreign countries) 

Report the total business receipts of this establishment during 1967. Report all sales and other receipts from 
this establishments business operations. Do not include nonoperating income; such as, interest, dividends, etc. 


s 






XX 


4-1 


Item 10 - BUSINESS RECEIPTS DURING 1967, BY TYPE OF RECEIPT 

A. Construction receipts — Of the amount reported in item 9, approximately how much represents receipts during 
1967 from construction activities? (Include receipts from both new construction and from maintenance and 
repair work.) 

Include all construction receipts from general contracting, special trades contracting, land development and land 
improvement work. Also include receipts from the sales of buildings and other structures built for sale (excluding 
from these receipts all value of the land but including the value of any improvements this establishment made to 
the land). Be sure to include the value of any construction work done by this establishment for itself. 
Exclude receipts for architectural and engineering work and exclude receipts from the rental of equipment to others. 


s 






XX 


4-2 


B. Receipts from land — Of the amount reported in item 9, approximately how much represented receipts during 
1967 from land sales? 
Exclude the value of improvements and land development reported in -\ above. 


s 






XX 


4-3 


C. Business receipts during 1967 from other than A and B above 

Include the business receipts of this establishment which were obtained from other activities such as architectural 
and engineering work, retail and wholesale trade, rental of equipment to others, manufacturing, transportation, legal 
service, insurance, finance, rental of property or other real estate operations, and other nonconstruction activities 
not included in \ and B above. 


s 






XX 


4-4 










XX 


4-5* 


(This total should be the same as the amount reported in item 9 above.) 


s 









ith item 1 1 on page 4 



194 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORMCC-1-Con. 



Page 4 



Item 11 - CLASSIFICATIONS OF CONSTRUCTION WORK 

NOTE: Items 11A, B, C, D, and E each asks for an estimated percentage breakdown of the Construction Receipts figure reported on line A, 
item 10. (Construction Receipts include receipts from both new construction and from maintenance and repair work.) 



A. Types of construction this establishment engaged in during 1967. 

On each of the lines below enter your best estimate of the percent 

of this establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in 1967 

by types of construction listed. 

Be sure to read instructions for item / I A in the instruction 
booklet before completing this item. 



Type of construction 



Building construction: 

Single-family houses 

Multi-family residential buildings (containing 
2-or-more housing units) including apartment houses. 

Other residential buildings (hotels, motels, 

and dormitories) 

Industrial buildings and warehouses 

Office and bank buildings 

Stores, restaurants, public garages and 

auto service stations 

Religious buildings 

Educational buildings 

Hospital and institutional buildings I . . 

Amusement, social, and recreational buildings . . . 
Other nonresidential buildings — Specify -- 



Nonbuilding construction: 

Highways and streets (including work closely re- 
lated to highway and street construction such as 
installation of guard rails, fences, highway signs, etc.) 

Bridges, tunnels and elevated highways 

Dam and reservoir construction 

Marine construction (dredging, underwater rock 
removal, breakwaters, navigational channels, 
locks, dikes, jetties, etc.) 

Harbor and port facility construction 

(docks, piers, wharves, etc.) 

Conservation anddevelopment construction (land 
reclamation, irrigation projects, drainage canals, 
levees, and flood control projects, etc.) 

Power and communication transmission lines, 
towers, and related facilities 

Sewers, water mains and related facilities 

Pipeline construction (gas, petroleum, etc.) .... 

Mass transit construction (railroads, subways, 

elevated railways, etc.) 

Heavy industrial facilities (blast furnaces, petro- 
leum refineries, chemical complexes, etc.) 

Other heavy construction (military and space 
facilities) 

Other types of construction work — Specify y 



TOTAL CONSTRUCTION RECEIPTS- 



Percent 

of total 

construction 

receipts 



stz. 



100 



CONTINUE WITH 71 B IN NEXT COLUMN 



Location o{ construction work in 1967 I " ' 

(1) Was all of the construction work this establishment engaged in 
during 1967 located within the State indicated by item IB? 

I □ Yes - SKIP to item 11C 

(2) Iodicateeach State in which this establishment engaged in construc- 
tion work and enteryourbest estimate of the percent of construction 
receipts accounted for in 1967 by the work in each State. 

(If more space is required use another sheet of paper and 
attach it to this report.) 



TOTAL CONSTRUCTION RECEIPTS 



100 



C. Ownership of construction projects (public or private) 

Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent of 
this establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in 
1967 by work on publicly owned projects and privately owned pro- 
jects. (Public construction includes projects owned by Federal, 
State, or local governments — including public authorities and 
special districts.) 



Public construction 

Private construction 

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION RECEIPTS 



1 6-3 



100 % 



D. Class of construction 

Indicate on the lines below your best estimate of the percent of 

this establishment's total construction receipts accounted for in 

1967 by the following classes of construction: 

New construction (including additions 

and alterations) , 



Maintenance and repair work 

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION RECEIPTS- 



100 



Work undertaken by this establishment for other construction 
contractors or for builders 

Did this establishment obtain receipts during 1967 for work 
undertaken for other contractors or builders? 
I □ Yes , 

Approximately what percent of this establish- 
ment's total construction receipts was 
accounted for by such work? 



2D No 



Item 12 - CHECKS TO ASSURE A COMPLETE AND ACCURATE REPORT 

The Census Bureau reviews your report for omissions, inconsistencies, 
and unusual entries. To save both you and the Government costly 
correspondence about such problems, please make the following 
checks before returning your completea report. 

A. Review the report carefully to see that you have not omitted 
answers to any items. 

B. Do the reported percentages add to 100% in items 11A, 11B, 
11C, and 11D? 

C. Is the total for Business Receipts (item 9) greater than the sum 
of Payrolls (item 5C) plus Total Payments Made By this 
Establishment During 1967 for Materials Purchased and for 
Construction Work Let to Others (item 6C)? 

1 □ Yes -SKIP to item 14 

2 [^j No — Review those entries for reasonableness and revise 
them if in error. If entries are correct indicate this in item 13. 



Item 13 - EXPLANATION SECTION - Use this spoce for additional explanation regarding the data reported for this establishment. 



(Itmore space is required use another sheet o I paper and attach it to this report. Be i 



: to include the 11-digit Census File Number shown in the address box on page 1.) 



Item 14 



CERTIFICATION 



Name of person to contact regarding this report 



Address (Number, street, city, State) 



I ZIP code 
I 



Telephone Numbe; 



Area code Number 



This report is substantially accurate and covers the period from . 



Signature of authorized person 



6-Q* 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



195 



PENALTIES FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE -APRIL 30, 1968 



Form opproved Budget Bureou No 41-66161 



US DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1967 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 

MEAT PROCESSING PLANTS 



RETURN TOj > 



JEFFERSONVILIE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



PLEASE READ GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS ON PAGE 2 AND INSTRUCTIONS 
ACCOMPANYING EACH ITEM BEFORE COMPLETING 

If book figures are not available, carefully prepared estimates are acceptable. 
The Census Bureau reviews your report for completeness and consistency. To avoid 
correspondence, please complete every item. Enter "0" in items 2-8 if appropriate. 
In all correspondence wilh the Census Bureau, include the lldigit Census File Number 
in the upper left uf the address box. High speed electronic equipment is used to identify 
both correspondence and reports. If your correspondence does not include the Census 
Kile Number, it will be returned to you for the addition of that number. Please enter the 
1 1 -digit number in the File No. space provided at the top of all odd-numbered pages. 



NOTICE- Response 

your report to the Cen 
and may be used only 
files are immune from 



for statistical pu 

legal pnu ess 



eel by la 

,1 It mi 

The la' 



13 I S O 

,■„ only by s 



tl„- same lav., 
tsus employees 



I correspondence pert 
tport refer to this Cei 



dining to this 
File Numbi 



Employer 

Number 



Identificotion 



ITEM 1 
Physical 
location (a) 
and 

Employer 
Identi- 
fication 
Number (b) 
Complete both 
(ol ond Ibl 



i. Is the address originally primed in the address box the ACTUAL PHYSICAL | «l County in which your establishment is physically located 

LOCATION of this establishment? I 

□ Yes-Complete lines 131. (4). and b. □ No-Complete lines ID through 14). and b. 



(1) Number i 


nd street (See 


otel 


City, village, < 


r uther place 




(2) Stale 


ZIP code 



(4) Is the establishment phys 
the boundaries of the cili 



ally located within 

3r village? 1 D Yes 



2 D No 



Note — If location cannot be described by number and street, giv 
of highway and approximate distance from nearest town. 



b. Is the Employer Identification (E.I.) Number printed in the addn 
label the SAME as that used for this establishment on your 
latest 1967 Employer's Quarterly Federal 
Tax Return. Treasury Form 941? 
D Yes D No-If "No." enter currently 
assigned E.I. No. here 



(9 digits* 



ITEM 2 
Number of 
employees 



Production workers- Workers (up through the working foreman levell engaged in 
fabricating, processing, assembling, inspecting, receiving, packing, warehousing, ship- 
ping (but nut delivering), maintenance, repair, janitorial, watchman services, product 
develiipmcnt. auxiliary production for plant's own use (e.g.. powerplant), record keeping, 
and other closely associated services. Exclude proprietors and partners. 
All other employees— Nonproductmn personnel, including those engaged in the 
following: supervision above working foreman level, sales (including driver salesmen!, 
sales delivery (including driver and helpers), advertising, credit, collection, installation 
and servicing of own products, clerical and routine office functions, executive, purchasing, 
finance, legal, personnel (including cafeteria, etc.), professional and technical. Exclude 
proprietors and partners. (See also General Instructions, page 2.) 



Number of produ 
during pay period 
the 12th of the m 



i wurkei 
luding 



a. March. 

b. May 



d. Novembe 



■ e. Sum of lines a-d 

| f. Average number (divide line e by 4-1 

| g. All other employees (pay period including March 12th).. 
! h. TOTAL (Sum of lines f and g) 



NOTE » 



Figures for dollars, man-hours. KWH should be 
Carefully enter your figures in the correct colurr 



ounded to thousands. Howeve 
is. e.g.. if payroll is $1,125,628. 



you 



Mthe 



- figur, 



Mil. Tr 



Dolfi. 



(Hi 



ITEM 3A 
Payrolls 
($000) 



Enter the total ibefore deductions) of wages, salaries, bonuses, 
commissions, and other remunerations paid in 1967. Exclude 
payments to proprietors and partners. (See also General Instructions. 
page 2.) 



a. Production workers* wages 

b. All other employees* salaries and wages. 

c. TOTAL (Sum of lines a and b)- 



ITEM 3B-Not applicable to this form. 



ITEM 4 

Plant 

man-hours 

of production 

workers, 

by quarter 

(000) 



Report man-hours of production workers (as defined in item 2| for 
each calendar quarter (or comparable 13-week period) of 1967. Do 
not include hours fur paid vacations, holidays or sick leave. Over- 
time hours should be actual hours, not straight time equivalent hours. 



a. January through March 

b. April through June 

c. July through September 

d. October through December 

e. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-d>- 



ITEM 5 

Cost of 

materials, 

fuels, 

electricity, 

contract 

work 

($000) 



On lines a and c, report the cost of all items actually consumed or 
put into production in 1967, whether purchased or -withdrawn 
from inventories. Purchase records may be used if purchases 
closely approximate consumption. "Cost" refers lo amounts actually 
paid or payable after discounts, and includes freight and other direct 
charges incurred in acquiring the items. (See also General Instruc- 
tions, page 2.) Item 5a should equal total of "Materials Consumed," 
item 17A (column D), Item 5c should equal total of "Fuels Con- 
sumed." item 17B Icolumn D). 



a. Cost of materials, parts, components, cont; 

b. Cost of products bought and resold as such 

c. Cost of fuels consumed 

d. Cost of purchased electricity 

e. Cost of contract work done for you by othe 

f. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-e) 



ITEM 6 
Inventories 
of this 
establishment 

($000) 



Report all inventories of this establishment at the beginning 
and end of 1%7 on a comparable basis. The reported figur 
should be in terms of cost (if feasible, on a current cost 



Invento 



a. Finished products 

b. Work-in-process... 



c. Materials, supplies, fuels, etc 

d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-cH 



cginningof 1967 



ITEM 7 
Capital 
expenditures 
during year 
(Exclude land) 
($000) 



Include all cos 
fixed assets ace 
are ordinarily 
of the kind de 
page 2.) 



actually incurred during 1967 chargeable to the 
unts and of the type for which depreciation accounts 
laintained. If you did not make any expenditure 
iribed, enter "0." (See also General Instructions, 



a. New structures and additions to this plant 

b. New machinery and new equipment 

c. Used plant and used equipment acquired from othei 

d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-c) 



ITEM 8 
Electricity 
(1,000 KWH) 



Report kilowatt hours of electricity purchased. 



1 1 — Not applicable to this for 
for 



Quantity of purchased electricity (for < 
is reported in item 5d). kilowatt hour- 



ITEMS 9, 10, and 



ITEM 12 
Legal form of 
organization 



Legal I 



1 U Individual propri 

2 D Pa; 



of organization of the 



D Corporalii 
8 D Co-op (co. 



npany which operati 



> this . 
irk if . 



-(X) appropriate bo 
operative associatioi 
•orporate and noncorporate 



ablishn 
, form . 



9 D Other-Specify- 



ITEM 13 

Changes in 

ownership 

or 

operation 

and 



a. Changes in ownership or operation of this establishment during 1967. 

(1) D No change in ownership or operation 

(2) □ Reorganized (Describe in "Remarks," e.g.. partnership change, or chai 

in corporale status! 

(3) D Started new business-Date 



! Discontinued operations— Date 

| 14) D Plant dismantled, abandoned < 
(5) D Plant idle or inactive but still c 



destroyed 
vned 



(6) D Mark this box if plant w 
(Enter below: name, addn 
known I of former owner o 



irchased or leased from another company, 
nd Employer Identification Number (if 
ratur and date of purchase or lease.) 



; (7) U Mark this box if plant was sold or leased to < 
■ (Enter below: name, address, and Employer Id' 

! (if known) of new owner or operator and date c 



mother company. 
•ntincation Numbe 
f sale or lease.) 



■ of company 



Address (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



Date 



b. Company affiliation-Complete only if the first digit of your Census File Number (imprinted in the addn 
Census records indicate these companies operate only one place of business. 
(1) Is this company owned or controlled by any other company? 



(2) Does this company own or control any c 

(3) Does this company operate more than o 
(41 Did this company have any plants unde 



EI 



npanies: 

■ of business? 

iction but not in operatic 

X-4 



. at the end of the year? 



M 



(If "Yes" is marked for 
any line, eomplete item 14) 

1 D Yes 2 D No 

1 D Yes 2 D No 

1 D Yes 2 D No 

1 O Yes 2 D No 



196 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MC-20B-Con. 



Form MC-20B 



Page 2 



Are payrolls and 
sales included 
in this report? 



ITEM 14 

a. Other 
companies 
owned or 
business 
locations 
operated 
Complete if 
item 13b(2), 
(3) or (4) is 
marked 
"Yes" 



nd address and Employer Identification Number 



Employer Identification Numbe 



Employer Identification Number 



Employer Identification Numbe 



TT 



Activity 

(Describe, e.g., retail, manufacture, etc. 

and chief products sold) 



Payroll and sale: 
($000) 



Millions Thous. 



Payroll 



Payroll 



Payroll 



-#- 



□ 



□ 



□ 



D 



□ 



□ 



b. Parent 
Company 

Complete if 

item 13b(l) is 
marked "Yes' 



Employer Identification Numbe: 



ITEM 15 — Not applicable to this form. 



Checks to 

assure a 

complete 

and 

accurate 

report 



The Census Bureau reviews your report for omissions, inconsistencies, and unusual ratios. To save you future correspondence about these problems, please make 
(he following checks before returning your report: (1) Review the report carefully to see that no items are omitted for the year being covered; (2) Calculate and enter 
figures for the four "reasonableness" checks below, and review the results; (3) Correct your report for any errors you find; explain unusual figures in "Remarks." 



"Reasonableness" checks 



i. Average hourly wages per production worker 



b. Hours worked per year per productk 



orke 



c. Salaries and wages per dollar of shipments 



d. Materials cost per dollar of shipn 



Calculation required for each check 



Item 3Aa (Production workers' wages)^-item 4e (Total man-hours) 



Item 4e (Total man-hours) X 1000-Htem 2f (Average number of production workers) 



Item 3Ac (Total payroll)-^ item 18 (Total value of shipments) 



Item 5f (Total materials co 



item 18 (Total value of shipments) 



Figures for 1967 



e. Is the total for value of shipments (item 18) greater than the sum for payroll (item 3Ac) plus total cost of materials, etc. (item 50 D Yes Q No — Expla 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



A separate Census report is required for each manufacturing establish- 
ment; therefore, based on Census records, a report form is provided for each 
establishment which your company operated in 1967. 

For purposes of the Census, a manufacturing establishment is defined 
as a single physical location where manufacturing operations are performed 
(e.g., a factory, mill, or plant). Thus a separate report is required for different 
physical locations even though the establishments may be engaged in the 
same line of manufacturing. 

Please note that establishments engaged in the following activities are 
also considered to be manufacturing for the purposes of this Census: Poultry 
dressing; milk pasteurizing and bottling; seafood, fresh packaged or frozen; 
apparel jobbing and contracting; logging camps and logging; sawmills: 
printing; publishing— book, magazine, periodical, etc.; manufacturing and 
delivering ready-mixed concrete; machine shops, including those operating 
on a job order basis; job casting, stamping, machining; plating, galvanizing, 
polishing materials owned by others, etc.; ship and boat repairing. 

In completing this report, a limited amount of prorating or estimating is 
acceptable if book records are not readily available. Include all the activities 
conducted within the establishment: e.g., manufacturing, fabricating, 
processing, and assembling; maintenance of plant and equipment; receiving, 



shipping;, warehousing, storage; research; record keeping; health, safety, 
cafeteria, and other services. 

Each report should cover the calendar year 1967. However, a report is 
required even if the establishment operated only part of the year. If your 
book records are not on a calendar year basis, carefully prepared estimates 
will be acceptable. If reporting on a calendar year basis will require con- 
siderable additional costs, and your fiscal year covers at least 10 months of 
the calendar year 1967 (i.e., ends between October 31, 1967 and February 29, 
1968), you may report on a fiscal year basis. However, all employment, 
payroll, and man-hour figures should relate to the calendar year rather than 
the fiscal year. (Calendar year payroll records should be available from your 
tax records.) 

In the certification, enter the exact dates of the period covered by the 
report. If the ownership changed during the year, complete the report only 
for that part of 1967 in which your company owned and operated the estab- 
lishment. Report in item 13 the appropriate information on changes in owner- 
ship or operations. 

If additional report forms are needed, write to the Jeffersonville Census 
Operations Office. Be sure to describe the type of activity of the establish- 
ments for which the additional report forms are requested. 



COINTINUATION OF IINSTRUCTIONS FOR ITEMS 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 



(Definitions of employees and payrolls used to calculate withholding taxes 
generally may be followed in completing items 2 and 3A, Employment and 
Payrolls.) 

Item 2. Number of Employees— Be sure to include all persons on 
paid sick leave, paid holidays, and paid vacation during the pay periods, as 
well as those actually working. Exclude members of armed forces and pen- 
sioners carried on your active rolls. Include officers at this establishment 
if a corporation; if an unincorporated concern, exclude proprietors or partners. 

Item 3A. Payrolls— Report the gross earnings paid in the calendar year 
1967 to employees on the payroll at the establishment prior to such deduc- 
tions as employee's Social Security contributions, withholding taxes, group 
insurance premiums, union dues, and savings bonds. Include in gross earn- 
ings, commissions, dismissal pay, paid bonuses, vacation and sick-leave pay, 
and the cash equivalent of compensation paid in kind. Include salaries of 
officers at this establishment if a corporation; if an unincorporated concern, 
exclude payments to proprietors or partners. Exclude payments to agricul- 
tural employees, fishermen, members of armed forces, and pensioners carried 
on your active payroll. 

Item 4. Plant Man-hours of Production Workers— If an employee 
elects to work during vacation periods, report only actual hours worked. 

Item 5. Cost of Materials, Fuels, Electricity, and Contract Work — 
If actual consumption records are not available, cost of purchases may be 
used if these do not differ significantly from the amounts actually used. The 
consumption of any major item which differs significantly from purchases 
should be estimated by adding beginning inventories to the amounts pur- 
chased and subtracting from this total the cost of goods on hand at the end 
of the year. 

Item 5a. Cost of Materials, Parts, Components, Containers, 
Supplies, etc., Consumed — Report the delivered cost of all raw materials, 
containers, scrap, and supplies, etc., which were: (1) put into production; 
(2) used as operating supplies; (3) used in repair and maintenance. Include 
also cost of materials owned by this establishment but consumed by other 
companies to make products for this establishment under contract. (The 
value of these products should be reported in item 18.) Amounts paid to 
other companies for such contract work should be reported on line 5e and 
should include freight out and in. If semi-finished goods, parts, or com- 
ponents were produced and incorporated into finished products at this plant 
during 1967, include the cost of raw materials used rather than the value of 
the intermediate products. 

Include only value of physical goods used or put into production. 
Exclude cost of such services as advertising, telephone, telegram and cable, 
insurance; developmental, research, or engineering; management, marketing, 
and other professional consultants, etc., unless charges for such services 
are included in the prices paid for materials. Exclude also such overhead 



items as depreciation charges against plant and equipment; rent and rental 
allowances, interest payments, royalties, and patent fees. Exclude materials, 
supplies, machinery, and equipment which were used in the construction of 
new structures or additions to your plant, or new machinery and equipment, 
and which were chargeable to fixed assets accounts. Exclude products 
purchased and resold without further manufacturing, processing or assem- 
bling; their costs should be included in item 5b. 

Item 5b. Cost of Goods Sold Without Further Manufacturing, 
Processing, or Assembling in this Establishment— Include all products 
bought and resold in the same condition as when purchased and not made part 
of another product manufactured by this establishment. (Total sales value of 
all products resold is to be reported in item 18 on the line for "Resales.") 

Item 5c. Fuels Consumed— Report cost of all fuels (including gasoline) 
consumed for heat, power, transportation, and the generation of electricity. 

Item 5e. Cost of Contract Work Done for You by Others on Your 
Materials— Report the total payments made during 1967 for any work done 
by others on materials furnished by your establishment, including freight 
out and in on the materials furnished by you. 

Item 7. Capital Expenditures for this Establishment (Exclude 
expenditures for land) — Capital expenditures during 1967 may be determined 
by the following computation: The cost of additions completed during the 
year, plus construction in progress at the end of the year, minus construction 
in progress at the beginning of the year. 

Item 7a. New Structures and Additions to Plant— Report total 
expenditures during 1967 for new construction (whether constructed on con- 
tract or by your own forces), major alterations, capitalized repairs, and improve- 
ment of buildings, including all new elevators, cranes, heating and ventilating 
equipment, essentially a part of the buildings. Also, other fixed structures 
(such as brick kilns, shipways, and similar types of structures), and site 
improvements (such as roads, docks, tracks, parking lots, fences, utilities). 

Item 7b. New Machinery and New Equipment — Report total 
expenditures at this establishment for new production machinery and equip- 
ment and other new machinery and equipment. Include replacements, as 
well as additions to capacity. Include the value of capitalized improvements 
and repairs to machinery and machinery produced and used at this establish- 
ment. Include all new motors, lathes, punch presses and similar machinery 
and equipment for use in production, as well as all new office machines and 
fixtures, furniture, cafeteria and dressing room furnishings, automobiles and 
trucks, and other similar equipment. 

Item 7c. Used Plant and Used Equipment Acquired from 
Others— Report total expenditures at this establishment for old or existing 
plants and for second-hand equipment acquired from others, including the 
U.S. Government. Include at approximate market value machinery or 
equipment transferred from other plants of your company. 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



197 



FORM MC-20B-Con. 



«"" MC-20B °* ""SEIESo? 


F COMMERCE 
THE CENSUS 


FILE NO. 


Page 3 


MEAT PROCESSING PLANTS - Continued 


Nome of establishment (Same as address bos) 


lt«m 16 - INDUSTRIAL WATER USE DURING 1967 


4-8 


Die total quantity of water intake (freeh and brackish) in this eetabliehment during the entire year 1967 - (Mark one box only) 

1 [J] Under 1 million gallons 3 LJ 10 to 19 million gallons 5 Q 100 million gallons or over 

2 I - ! 1 to 9 million gallons « D 20 to 99 million gallons 


ItM 17A - CONSUMPTION OF SELECTED MATERIALS DURING 1967 

REPORT SEPARATELY FOR EACH LISTED MATERIAL THAT WAS ACTUALLY CONSUMED OR PUT IN PRODUCTION DURING 1967 


INSTRUCTIONS 

Report delivered cost of the individual items below Exclude materials owned by others used in this plant 
which were consumed or put in production during 1967. to make products for other establishments under con- 
(See General Instructions (item 5), for valuation.) tract or on commission. However, report receipts for 

this contract work in item 18 . 
Include materials owned by this establishment but ^ 9 _ 18 . INCLUDE only those mea t meterials that 
consumed by other establishments to make products for wepe further processed into sausa g e , smoked meats, 
this establishment under contract. canned meats, etc., during the year. EXCLUDE those 

c materials which you later sold in the same condition 
(Report cost of this contract work in item 5e; and ^ purchased, also exclude purchased carcasses later 
the value of the products produced in item 18.) sQld ag fresh meat (primal md fabricate d cuts, 

boneless meats, etc.). The cost of such resales 
should be reported in item 5b . 


1 

J 


L7_ 


7-1 




7-2 ! 7-3 7-4 


Materials, parts, and supplies 
(A) 


Census 

material 

code 

(B-l) 


Unit of 

measure 

for 

quantities 

(B-2) 


Consumption of purchased materials and of materials 
received from other establishments of your company 


[f $5,000 or more of the listed 
item was consumed — 


If you consumed 
some but less 
than J5.000 
worth of the 
listed item. 

(X) 

(E) 


Quantity 
(O 


Cost, including delivery cost 

(freight-in) 

(D) 


Millions ] ™°£ 


Dol- 


000 1 000 


ooo 


1 


ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED 
Cattle 

Number of head 


013513 


7 


Number 




$ 






2 


Live weight 


013511 


1 


Thousand 
pounds 










3 


Calves 

Number of head 


013523 


6 


Number 










A 


Live weight 


013521 





Thousand 
pounds 










5 


Sheep and lamb 
Number of head 


013943 


6 


Number 










6 


Live weight 


013941 





Thousand 
pounds 










7 


Hogs 

Number of head 


013633 


3 


Number 










8 


Live weight 


013631 


7 


Thousand 
pounds 










9 


MEAT MATERIALS PURCHASED FROM OTHER PACKERS, 
INCLUDING INTERPLANT TRANSFERS 

(Value of carcasses cut up for resale 
fresh should be reported as "Cost of 
Resales" in item 5B. ) 

Fresh and frozen meats, including 
variety meats. 
Beef 


201111 


2 


Thousand 
pounds 










10 


Veal 


201121 


1 


Thousand 
pounds 










11 


Lamb 


201131 





Thousand 
pounds 










12 


Pork 


201141 


9 


Thousand 
pounds 










13 


Meat materials for sausage and canning 
not separable by species 


201101 


3 


Thousand 
pounds 










1A 


Processed pork-cured, smoked, etc. 


201161 


7 


Thousand 
pounds 










15 


Other purchased meat materials (cured beef, 
cured lamb, goat meat, etc.) 


201102 


1 


Thousand 
pounds 











198 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MC-20B-Con. 

Form MC-20B 



Item 17A - CONSUMPTION OF SELECTED MATERIALS DURING 1967 - Continued 


Page 4 






Ll 


7-1 




7-2 7-3 7-4 


Materials, parts, and supplies 
(A) 


Census 

material 

code 

(B-l) 


Unit of 

measure 

for 

quantities 

(B-2) 


Consumption of purchased materials and of materials 
received from other establishments of your company 


If $5,000 or more of the listed 
item was consumed — 


some but leas 
then $5,000 
worth of the 
liated item, 
enter an 

(X) 
(E) 


Quantity 
(C) 


Coat, including delivery coat 

(freight-in) 

(D) 


Millions i ™°£ 


" Ool- 

l.ra 


000 | 000 


000 


16 


HIDES, SKINS AND PELTS PURCHASED, including 
transfers from other establishments of 
this company 


201191 


4 






$ 




( ) 


17 


CASINGS 
Animal casings purchased, including 
transfers from other establishments of 
this company 


201391 













( ) 


18 


Casings, synthetic, including cellulosic 
and fibrous reinforced. 


307914 


2 










( ) 


19 


All other materials and components, parts, 

(List the three principal "All other 
materials, etc.," included in the above.) 


970099 


8 






























20 


TOTAL t 
(Sum of lines 1-19. should 
be same as item 5a) 










$ 














Item 17B - DETAILED FUELS CONSUMED DURING 1967 


"1 


1 7 


7-1 




7-2 7-3 


7-4 


Fuels obtained by purchase or transfer - 

(\ nine fuels received from other establishments 
of your company, at estimated market value.) 

(A) 


Census 
code 

(B-l) 


Unit of 
measure 

for 
quantities 

(B-2) 


If S2.000 or more of the listed 
item was consumed 


If you consumed 
aomc but leaa 
than (2,000 
worth of the 
liated item. 

(\) 
(E> 


Quantity 
(O 


Coat, including 

delivery cost 

(freight-in) 

(D) 


«"«- J III 


Ool- 


ooo | ooo 


90S 


1 


Coal - anthracite, bituminous, and lignite 


121005 


3 


Short 
tons 




$ 






2 


Fuel oil 

Distillate (light) grade numbers 1, 2, 
4, and light diesel fuel 


291141 





Barrel 
(42 gals.) 










3 


Residual (heavy) grade numbers 5 and 6 
and heavy diesel fuel 


291151 


9 


Barrel 
(42 gals.) 










4 


Gas - natural, manufactured, and mixed 


131300 


6 


1,000 
cu. feet 










5 


Other fuels 


960011 


5 












6 


TOTAL 










$ 






(Sum of lines 1-6 should 
be same as item 5c) 










Item 18 - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 


Section I - METHOD OF OPERATION 


2 
c 


Operation 
(Mark the one box which best describes your method of operation) 




Key 


Mark 

one 




8 


8-1 







1 


Custom slaughtering of livestock or poultry owned by others 


8-2 


( ) 101 


2 


Meat and poultry products processed chiefly from livestock or poultry slaughtered in 
this establishment 


8-3 


( ) 103 


3 


Manufacturing sausage, smoked meats, canned meats or meat specialties from meat 
slaughtered elsewhere 


8-4 


( ) 105 


4 


Chiefly retailing, wholesaling or jobbing meats and poultry products purchased and 
resold 


8-5 


( ) 109 



Picas* continue on peg* J 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



199 



FORM MC-20B-Con. 



">«" MC-20B "'"'Zl^VAZr^Zi 
( 20° 2 ) 1967 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 

MEAT PROCESSING PLANTS - Continued 


FILE NO. 


P.,. 5 


Name of establishment (Some aa address box) 


hem 18 - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 

PLEASE READ THE ENTIRE LIST OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES BELOW BEFORE ANSWERING THIS INQUIRY 


Section II - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES 


INSTRUCTIONS 

PRODUCTS SHIPPED AND OTHER RECEIPTS - Report the Line -41 - RESALES - Report on this line the invoice 
quantity and value of each product made and sales value of products sold in the same condition 
physically shipped during 1967 from this establish- as purchased, including meat, hides, skins, pelts, 
ment, including products shipped to other plants, casings, etc., and which are not made part of any 
sales branches, retail stores, or warehouses of products included on lines 1-36. Include in 
your company and on consignment. Deduct returned "Resales" the sales of fresh meats prepared from 
goods. Also report the value of services performed purchased carcasses. (The cost of such resold 
at this establishment. goods should be reported in item 5b.) 


"1 




Ll 


8-1X 


8-3 8-4 




Census 

product 

code 

(B.l) 


Products shipped and other receipts 


Products and services 
(A) 


Quantity 

(Thousand pounds) 
(D) 


Value, f.o.b. plant 
(E) 


Mi"i— | ™X 


Dollars 


000 1 000 


000 


1 


FRESH AND FROZEN MEAT 

Beef, not canned or made into sausage 

Whole carcass beef from animals slaughtered in this plant 


20111 12 


6 




$ ! 




2 


Primal and fabricated cuts from animals slaughtered 
in this plant 


20111 17 


5 








3 


Boneless beef, including hamburger, from animals slaughtered 
in this plant 


20111 31 


6 








4 


Variety meats (edible organs) from animals slaughtered 
in this plant 


20111 51 


4 








5 


Other edible beef, including corn beef, from animals 
slaughtered in this plant 


20111 71 


2 








6 


Veal not canned or made into sausage 

Whole carcass veal from animals slaughtered in this plant 


20112 12 


4 








7 


Primal cuts, fabricated cuts and boneless veal from animals 
slaughtered in this plant 


20112 17 


3 








8 


Other edible veal, including edible organs from animals 
slaughtered in this plant 


20112 61 


1 








3 


Pork, fresh and frozen 

Whole carcass pork from animals slaughtered in this plant 


20114 12 











10 


Primal cuts, including trimmings from animals slaughtered 
in this plant 


20114 17 


9 








11 


Variety meats (fresh edible organs) from animals 
slaughtered in this plant 


20114 51 


8 








12 


PORK PROCESSED OR CURED, (Including frozen, not canned or made 
into sausage. (20136) 

Sweet pickled or dry-cured (not smoked or cooked) 


20136 12 


3 








13 


Dry salt pork 


20136 22 


2 








14 


Smoked pork (not otherwise cooked) 
Hams and picnics, except canned 


20136 31 


3 








15 


Slab bacon 


20136 35 


4 








16 


Sliced bacon 


20136 41 


2 








17 


Other smoked pork 


20136 52 


9 








13 


Boiled ham, barbecue pork and other cooked pork, except 
canned meats and sausage 


20136 61 












Pleat* continue on | 



200 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MC-20B-Con. 

Form MC-20B 



Item 18 - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 - Continuad 


Pa 




Section II - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES - Continued 


i« 6 


B 

3 

-1 




l» 


8-1X 


«-3 «-4 




Census 

product 

code 

(B-l) 


Products shipped and other receipts 


Products and services 
(A) 


Quantity 

(Thousand pounds) 
(D) 


Value, f.o.b. plant 
(E) 


Millions 1 *"°o* 


DolU™ 


000 1 000 


000 


19 


SAUSAGES AND SIMILAR PRODUCTS (NOT CANNED) (20137) 
Fresh sausages (pork sausage, breakfast links, etc.) 


20137 11 


3 




$ : 




20 


Dry or semidry (salami, cervelat, peperoni, summer sausage, 
pork roll, etc. ) 


20137 17 











21 


Frankfurters and wieners 


20137 21 


2 








22 


Other sausage, smoked or cooked (bologna, liverwurst, polish 
sausage, packed luncheon meats, minced roll, smoked pork 
sausage, etc.) 


20137 35 


2 








23 


Jellied goods and similar preparations, not canned 
(headcheese, meat loaves, scrapple, puddings, chili con carne, 
imitation sausage, etc.) 


20137 91 


5 








24 


CANNED MEATS, EXCEPT DOG AND CAT FOOD, CONTAINING 20% OR 
MORE MEAT (20138) 


20138 11 


1 








25 


NATURAL SAUSAGE CASING AND OTHER PROCESSED MEAT (20139) 
Beef sausage casings 


20139 11 


9 








26 


Hog sausage casings 


20139 31 


7 








27 


Sheep and lamb sausage casings 


20139 51 


5 








28 


Other animal casings 


20139 61 


4 








29 


LARD 

Consumer sizes ( containers of 3 pounds or less) 


20115 13 


5 








30 


Commercial sizes (containers of more than 3 pounds) 


20115 17 


6 








31 


FROZEN BEEF AND PORK PIES 


20373 31 


2 








32 


FROZEN POULTRY PIES 


20373 35 


3 








33 


ALL OTHER PRODUCTS MADE IN THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

Describe and report separately for each product whose value 
was $50,000 or more and not listed above. (Specify in 
thousands of pounds for quantity.) For all remaining products 
describe and report a single total value 












34 














35 














36 


CONTRACT WORK 

Receipts for work done for others on their own materials . . . 
(Describe products worked on and kind of work) 


93000 00 


8 




















37 


RECEIPTS FOR SLAUGHTERING ANIMALS OWNED BY OTHERS 


20110 93 


8 








38 


MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS 
Sales of scrap and refuse 


99980 13 


3 








39 


Receipts for research and developmental work 


99980 41 


9 








40 


Other miscellaneous receipts, including, 
receipts for repair work, etc . 


99980 98 


9 








41 


RESALES 

Sales of products bought and resold without further 
manufacture, processing or assembly in this establishment. 
Include sales of fresh meat from purchased carcasses 
(The cost of such items should be reported in item 5b.) 


99989 00 


6 








42 




TOTAL „ 


77000 00 


8 




$ 




(Sum of lines 1-41, column (E)) 




Items 19-21 - Not applicable to this form 


It cm 22 


— -— — — 


\ddreas (Number ar,d street. city. Stole) 


ZIP code 


Telephone 


Area code N 


umber 


Estension 


CERTIFICATION - Thi. report la „„h.,.„ii„lly Rm ,™„ „„d rover, the period f,™ .„ 


Name o( compan> 


Address (Number and street, city. State) 


ZIP code 






Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 



Use additional sheets of paper, if necessary, to comp/e 



submit any explanation. Identify each sheet with the 1 Udigit file number appearing over you 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



201 



PENALTIES FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE-APRIl 30, 1968 



approved Budget Burt 



I No. 



k»* MC-20C 

(20031 



US DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1967 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 

POULTRY AND SMALL GAME PRODUCTS 



RETURN TO~^ > 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 

Jeffersorwille Indiana 47130 



PLEASE READ GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS ON PAGE 2 AND INSTRUCTIONS 
ACCOMPANYING EACH ITEM BEFORE COMPLETING 
II book figures are not available, carefully prepared estimates are acceptable. 
The Census Bureau reviews your report f..r completeness and consistency. To avoid 
correspondence, please complete every item. Enter "0" in items 2-8 if appropriate. 
In all correspondence with the Census Bureau, include the ll-dut.it Census File Number 
in ill,- upper left ul the address box. Hie.li speed electronic equipment is used to identify 
both correspondence and reports. If your correspondence does not include the Census 
File Number, it will be returned to you for the addition of that number. Please enter the 
It -digit number in the File No. space provided at the top of oil odd-numbered pages. 



NOTICE- Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U.S. Codel. By the same law, 
your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census employees- 
and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies retained in your 
files are immune from leiial process. 



correspondence perta 
port refer to this CenS' 



MC-20C (2003| 



>ing 



>this 
I Number 



Employer Identification 
Number ^ 



KEEP THIS COPY FOR YOUR FILES 

PLEASE COMPLETE AND RETURN THE FORM WHICH 
SHOWS YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS 



if mailing address has changed) 



ITEM 1 
Physical 
location (a) 
and 

Employer 
Identi- 
fication 
Number (b) 
Complete both 
(a) and (b) 



Is the address originally printed in the address box the ACTUAL PHYSICAL ; 
LOCATION of this establishment? ) 

2 Yes -Complete lines (31, 14), and b. D No -Complete lines (1) through (4). and b. T 



nt v in which your establishment is physically located 



(1) Number and street (See note) 


City, village. 


)T other place 




(21 State 


ZIP code 



(4) 1b the establishment physically located within 

the boundaries of the city or village? 1 D Yes 2 D No 



Note- If location cannot be described by numbei 
of highway and approximate distance from 



+ 



. Is the Employer Identification (E.I.) Number printed in the addn 
label the SAME as that used for this establishment on your 
latest 1967 Employer's Quarterly Federal 
Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 
D Yes □ No- If "No," enter currently 
assigned E.I. No. here 



(9 digits) 



ITEM 2 
Number of 
employees 



Production workers- \v orkers lup through the working foreman level) engaged in J 

fabricating, processing, assembling, inspecting, receiving, packing, warehousing, ship- | 

ping ibut not delivering!, maintenance, repair, janitorial, watchman services, product ; 

development, auxiliary production for plant's own use (e.g., powerplant), record keeping, j 
and other closel} associated services. Exclude proprietors and partners. 

All other employees — Nonproduction personnel, including those engaged in the j 

following: supervision above working foreman level, sales (including driver salesmen), ! 

sales delivery (including driver and helpers}, advertising, credit, collection, installation | e. Si 

and servicing of own products, clerical and routine office functions, executive, purchasing, , f. a 

finance, legal, personnel (including cafeteria, etc.). professional and technical. Exclude ; 
proprietors and partners. (See also General Instructions, page 2.) 



Number of production worker 
during pay period, including 
the 12th of the month 



a. March.... 

b. May 

e. August... 
d. Novembe 



i of li. 



age number (divide line e by 4) 

! g. All other employees (pay period including March 12th).. 
! h. TOTAL (Sum of lines f and g) 



Mil.Tfhou. DoU. 



jres for dollar*, man-hours. KWH should be rounded to thousands. However, you may enter figures to nearest dolh 

efull> enier vur Inures in the correct columns, e.g.. if payroll is $1,125,628. report either: I $ ( 126 



OH 



ITEM 3A 
Payrolls 

($000) 



,ll .before deduCtK 

and ..(her remun 



alaries. bonuse 

1967. Exclu( 

icral Instruction 



a. Production workers' wages 

b. All other employees' salaries . 

c. TOTAL (Sum of lines . 



id wages.. 
and bf— 



ITEM 3B-Not applicable to this fori 



ITEM 4 

Plant 

man-hours 

of production 

workers, 

by quarter 

(000) 



Report man-hours of production workers (as defined in item 2) for 
each calendar quarter (or comparable 13-week period) of 1967. Do 
not include hours for paid vacations, holidays or sick leave. Over- 
time hours should be actual hours, not straight time equivalent hours. 



a. January through March.. 

b. April through June 

c. July through September, 

d. October through Deceml 

e. TOTAL (Sum of li 



ITEM 5 

Cost of 

materials, 

fuels, 

electricity, 

contract 

work 

($000) 



On lines a and c, report the cost of all item 
put into production in 1967, whethei 
from inventories. Purchase records ma 
closely approximate consumption. "Cost" 
paid or payable after discounts, and includ 



iih.fr. 



; actually cor 

purchased or 

- be used if purchases 

refers to amounts actually 

freight and other direct 



oldi 



charges incurred in acquiring the items. (See also General lnstn 
lions, page 2.) Item 5a should equal total of "Materials Consumed." 
item 17A [column D). hem 5c should equal total of "Fuels Con- 
sumed." item 17B (column D). 



a. Cost of materials, parts, com 

b. Cost of products bought and i 

c. Cost of fuels consumed 

d. Cost of purchased electricity 

e. Cost of contract work done for you by others i 

f. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-e) 



i your materials 



ITEM 6 
Inventories 
of this 

establishment 
($000) 



Report all 



Should b< 

basis). 



iesof this establishn 
i a comparable basis, 
of cost (if feasible. < 



nt at the beginning 
The reported figun 



Invento 



a. Finished products 

b. Work-in-process 

c. Materials, supplies, fuels, 

d. TOTAL (Sum of lir. 



Key 



Beginning of 1967 



ITEM 7 
Capital 
expenditures 
during yetir 
(Exclude land) 
($000) 



Include all costs actually incurred during 1967 chargeable to the 
fixed ^-<-ls accounts and of the type for which depreciation accounts 
are ordinarily maintained. If you did not make any expenditure 
of the kind described, enter "0." (See also General Instructions, 
page 2.) 



a. New structures and additions to this plant 

b. New machinery and new equipment 

c. Used plant and used equipment acquired from others 

d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a-c>- 



ITEM 8 

Electricity 
(1,000 KWH) 



! hours of electn 



Quantity of purchased electricity (for 
is reported in item 5d). kilowatt hour 



ITEMS 9, 10, and 1 1 -Not applicable to this form. 



ITEM 12 
Legal form of 
organization 



Legal form of organii 

1 G Individual proprieu 

2 C Partnership 



on of the company which operates this establishment— (X) appropriate box 
D Corporation (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 
8 D Co-op (cooperative association), corporate and noncorporate 



9 D Ojher- Specify- 



ITEM 1 3 

Changes in 

ownership 

or 

operation 

and 



a. Changes in ownership or operation of this establishment during 1967. 

(1) n No change in ownership or operation 

(2) D Reorganized (Describe in "Remarks," e.g., partnership change, or chat 

in corporate status) 

(3) D Started new business-Date 



j Discontinued operations — Date 

| (4) D Plant dismantled, abandoned or destroyed 
! (5) D Plant idle or inactive but still owned 



(6) D Mark this box if plant was purchased or leased from another company. j (7) U Mark this box if plant was sold or leased to another company. 

(Enter below: name, address, and Employer Identification Number (if | (Enter below: name, address, and Employer Identification Numbei 

known) of former owner or operator and date of purchase or lease.) (if known) of new owner or operator and date of sale or lease.) 



Name of company 



; (Number, street, city. State, ZIP code) 



h. Company affiliation — Complet 
Census i 
(1) Is this company owned or coi 
12) Does this company own or control any 
(3) Does this company operate more than 
14) Did (his company have any plants undt 



■ only if the first digit of your Census File Number (imprinted in the addn 
:cords indicate these companies operate only one place of business, 
trolled by any other company?.../. 



(If "Yes" is marked for I \-3 
any line, complete item 14) 
1 D Yes 2 D No 



' place of business? 



M 



l but not in operation at the end of the year? 



w 



1 D Yes 2 D No 
1 Q Yes 2 D No 
1 D Yes 2 D No 



202 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MC-20C-Con. 



Form MC-20C 



Page 2 



Are payrolls and 
sales included 
in this report? 



ITEM 14 

a. Oth.r 
companies 
owned or 
business 
locations 
operated 
Complete if 
item )3b(2), 
(3) or (4) is 
marked 
"Yes" 



Name and address and Employer Identification Numbe 



Employer Identification Number — — — "_ 



Employer Identification Numbe 



Employer Identification Number . 



(Describe, e.g., retail, manufacture, etc. 
and chief products sold) 



Payroll and sales 
($000) 



Payroll 



Payroll 



Payroll 



□ 



□ 



□ 



□ 



□ 



□ 



b. Parent 
Company 

Complete if 
item 13b(l) is 
marked "Yes" 



Employer Identification Number 



ITEM 15- Not applicable to this form. 



Checks to 

assure a 

complete 

and 

accurate 

report 



The Census Bureau reviews your report for omissions, ii 
the following checks before returning your report: (1) Re 
figures for the four "reasonableness" checks below, and 



nsistencies, and unusual ratios. To save you future correspondence ab 
w the report carefully to see that no items are omitted for the year beinf 
view the results; (3) Correct your report for any errors you find; expla 



:se problems, please make 
ed: (2) Calculate and enter 
aual figures in "Remarks." 



"Reasonableness" checks 



Average hourly wages per produ 



b. Hours worked per year per produ 



nd wages per dollar of shipments 



d. Materials cost per dollar of shipments 



equired for each check 



Item 3Aa (Producti. 



ivages)-^item 4e (Total man-hours) 



Item 4e (Total i 



c 1000-Htem 2f (Average number of production workers) 



Item 3Ac (Total payroll)^- item 18 (Total value of shipments) 



Item 5f (Total materials 



18 (Total value of shipments) 



Figu 



e. Is the total for value of shir 



i (item 181 greater than the sum for payroll (item 3Ac) plus total cost of materials, etc. (item 5f) D Yes D No-Expla 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 



A separate Census report is required for each manufacturing establish- 
ment; therefore, based on Census records, a report form is provided for each 
establishment which your company operated in 1967. 

For purposes of the Census, a manufacturing establishment is defined 
as a single physical location where manufacturing operations are performed 
(e.g., a factory, mill, or plant). Thus a separate report is required for different 
physical locations even though the establishments may be engaged in the 
same line of manufacturing. 

Please note that establishments engaged in the following activities are 
also considered to be manufacturing for the purposes of this Census: Poultry 
dressing; milk pasteurizing and bottling; seafood, fresh packaged or frozen; 
apparel jobbing and contracting; logging camps and logging; sawmills; 
printing; publishing— book, magazine, periodical, etc.; manufacturing and 
delivering ready-mixed concrete; machine shops, including those operating 
on a job order basis; job casting, stamping, machining; plating, galvanizing, 
polishing materials owned by others, etc.; ship and boat repairing. 

In completing this report, a limited amount of prorating or estimating is 
acceptable if book records are not readily available. Include all the activities 
conducted within the establishment: e.g., manufacturing, fabricating, 
processing, and assembling; maintenance of plant and equipment; receiving. 



shipping, warehousing, storage; research; record keeping; health, safety, 
cafeteria, and other services. 

Each report should cover the calendar year 1967. However, a report is 
required even if the establishment operated only part of the year. If your 
book records are not on a calendar year basis, carefully prepared estimates 
will be acceptable. If reporting on a calendar year basis will require con- 
siderable additional costs, and your fiscal year covers at least 10 months of 
the calendar year 1967 (i.e., ends between October 31, 1967 and February 29, 
1968), you may report on a fiscal year basis. However, all employment, 
payroll, and man-hour figures should relate to the calendar year rather than 
the fiscal year. (Calendar year payroll records should be available from your 
tax records.) 

In the certification, enter the exact dates of the period covered by the 
report. If the ownership changed during the year, complete the report only 
for that part of 1967 in which your company owned and operated the estab- 
lishment. Report in item 13 the appropriate information on changes in owner- 
ship or operations. 

If additional report forms are needed, write to the Jeffersonville Census 
Operations Office. Be sure to describe the type of activity of the establish- 
ments for which the additional report forms are requested. 



CONTINUATION OF INSTRUCTIONS FOR ITEMS 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 



(Definitions of employees and payrolls used to calculate withholding taxes 
generally may be followed in completing items 2 and 3A, Employment and 
Payrolls.) 

Item 2. Number of Employees— Be sure to include all persons on 
paid sick leave, paid holidays, and paid vacation during the pay periods, as 
well as those actually working. Exclude members of armed forces and pen- 
sioners carried on your active rolls. Include officers at this establishment 
if a corporation; if an unincorporated concern, exclude proprietors or partners. 

Item 3A. Payrolls— Report the gross earnings paid in the calendar year 
1967 to employees on the payroll at the establishment prior to such deduc- 
tions as employee's Social Security contributions, withholding taxes, group 
insurance premiums, union dues, and savings bonds. Include in gross earn- 
ings, commissions, dismissal pay, paid bonuses, vacation and sick-leave pay, 
and the cash equivalent of compensation paid in kind. Include salaries of 
officers at this establishment if a corporation; if an unincorporated concern, 
exclude payments to proprietors or partners. Exclude payments to agricul- 
tural employees, fishermen, members of armed forces, and pensioners carried 
on your active payroll. 

Item 4. Plant Man-hours of Production Workers— If an employee 
elects to work during vacation periods, report only actual hours worked. 

Item 5. Cost of Materials, Fuels, Electricity, and Contract Work — 
If actual consumption records are not available, cost of purchases may be 
used if these do not differ significantly from the amounts actually used. The 
consumption of any major item which differs significantly from purchases 
should be estimated by adding beginning inventories to the amounts pur- 
chased and subtracting from this total the cost of goods on hand at the end 
of the year. 

Item 5a. Cost of Materials, Parts, Components, Containers, 
Supplies, etc., Consumed — Report the delivered cost of all raw materials, 
containers, scrap, and supplies, etc., which were: (1) put into production; 
(2) used as operating supplies; (3) used in repair and maintenance. Include 
also cost of materials owned by this establishment but consumed by other 
companies to make products for this establishment under contract. (The 
value of these products should be reported in item 18.) Amounts paid to 
other companies for such contract work should be reported on line 5e and 
should include freight out and in. If semi-finished goods, parts, or com- 
ponents were produced and incorporated into finished products at this plant 
during 1967, include the cost of raw materials used rather than the value of 
the intermediate products. 

Include only value of physical poods used or put into production. 
Exclude cost of such services as advertising, telephone, telegram and cable, 
insurance; developmental, research, or engineering; management, marketing, 
and other professional consultants, etc., unless charges for such services 
are included in the prices paid for materials. Exclude also such overhead 



items as depreciation charges against plant and equipment; rent and rental 
allowances, interest payments, royalties, and patent fees. Exclude materials, 
supplies, machinery, and equipment which were used in the construction of 
new structures or additions to your plant, or new machinery and equipment, 
and which were chargeable to fixed assets accounts. Exclude products 
purchased and resold without further manufacturing, processing or assem- 
bling; their costs should be included in item 5b. 

Item 5b. Cost of Goods Sold Without Further Manufacturing, 
Processing, or Assembling in this Establishment — Include all products 
bought and resold in the same condition as when purchased and not made part 
of another product manufactured by this establishment. (Total sales value of 
all products resold is to be reported in item 18 on the line for "Resales.") 

Item 5c. Fuels Consumed— Report cost of all fuels (including gasoline) 
consumed for heat, power, transportation, and the generation of electricity. 

Item 5e. Cost of Contract Work Done for You by Others on Your 
Materials— Report the total payments made during 1967 for any work done 
by others on materials furnished by your establishment, including freight 
out and in on the materials furnished by you. 

Item 7. Capital Expenditures for this Establishment (Exclude 
expenditures for land) — Capital expenditures during 1967 may be determined 
by the following computation: The cost of additions completed during the 
year, plus construction in progress at the end of the year, minus construction 
in progress at the beginning of the year. 

Item 7a. New Structures and Additions to Plant— Report total 
expenditures during 1967 for new construction (whether construe ed on con- 
tract or by your own forces), major alterations, capitalized repairs, ai.d improve- 
ment of buildings, including all new elevators, cranes, heating and ventilating 
equipment, essentially a part of the buildings. Also, other fixed structures 
(such as brick kilns, shipways, and similar types of structures) and site 
improvements (such as roads, docks, tracks, parking lots, fences, utilities). 

Item 7b. New Machinery and New Equipment — Report total 
expenditures at this establishment for new production machinery and equip- 
ment and other new machinery and equipment. Include replacements, as 
well as additions to capacity. Include the value of capitalized improvements 
and repairs to machinery and machinery produced and used at this establish- 
ment. Include all new motors, lathes, punch presses and similar machinery 
and equipment for use in production, as well as all new office machines and 
fixtures, furniture, cafeteria and dressing room furnishings, automobiles and 
trucks, and other similar equipment. 

Item 7c. Used Plant and Used Equipment Acquired from 
Others— Report total expenditures at this establishment for old or existing 
plants and for second-hand equipment acquired from others, including the 
U.S. Government. Include at approximate market value machinery or 
equipment transferred from other plants of your company. 



PImm continue on Page 3 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



203 



FORM MC-20C-Con. 



M0-2U0 BUREAU 

( 2003) )967 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 


T ° 


jF COMMERC 
' THE CENSU 


e 


FILE NO. 


Page 3 


POULTRY AND SMALL GAME PRODUCTS - Continued 


Name ol establishment (Same as addresa box! 


Item 16 - INDUSTRIAL WATER USE DURING 1967 


4-8 


The total quantity of water intake (fresh and brackish) in this establishment during the entire year 1967 - (Mark one box only) 

1 LJ Dnder 1 million gallons 3 LJ 10 to 19 million gallons 5 Q] 100 million gallons or over 

2 rj 1 to 9 million gallons 4 O 20 to 99 million gallons 


Item 17A - CONSUMPTION OF SELECTED MATERIALS DURING 1967 

REPORT SEPARATELY FOR EACH LISTED MATERIAL THAT WAS ACTUALLY CONSUMED OR PUT IN PRODUCTION DURING 1967 


INSTRUCTIONS 

Report delivered cost of the individual items below (Report cost of this contract work in item 5e; and 
which were consumed or put in production during 1967. the value of the products produced in item 18. ) 
(See General Instructions (item 5), for valuation.) _ , _ . ^ , , ... 

Exclude materials owned by others used in this plant 
Include materials owned by this establishment but to make products for other establishments under con- 
consumed by other establishments to maie products for tract or on commission. However, report receipts for 
this establishment under contract. this contract work in item 18. 


"i 

.1 
J 


L 


r 


7-1 




7-2 7-3 7-4 




Census 

material 

code 

(B-l) 


Unit of 

for 
quantities 

(B-2) 


Consumption of purchased materials and of materials 
received from other establishments of your company 


Materials, parts, and supplies 
(A) 


If 15,000 or more of the listed 
item was consumed - 


If you consumed 
some but less 
than 15.000 
worth of the 
listed item. 

IX) 

<E) 


Quantity 


Cost, including delivery cost 
(freight-in) 


Millions | Tho "- 


Dol- 


000 1 000 


000 


1 


POULTRY KILLED 

Young chickens, incl. commercial broilers 


013011 


2 


Live 

weight 

thousand 




$ I 




( ) 


2 


Hens (or fowl) and other chickens 


013021 


1 








( ) 


3 


Turkeys 


013431 


2 


pounds 








( ) 


4 


■ Other poultry and small game, including 
ducks, geese, rabbits, etc. 


013435 


3 










( ) 


5 


OTHER MATERIALS USED 

Dressed poultry purchased as such (cost of 
poultry killed in other plants and cut-up 
in this plant for resale fresh should be 
reported as "Cost of resales" in Item 5B. ) 


201501 


4 


Dressed 

weight 

thousand 

pounds 








( ) 


6 


Shell eggs 


013451 





Case 
(30 doz.) 




!_ 




( ) 


7 


All other materials, containers, and 

(List the three principal "All other 
materials, etc. " included in the above.) 


970099 


8 
























8 


TOTAL „ 










$ ! 






(Sum of lines 1-7 should be same as item 5a) 










Item 17B - DETAILED FUELS CONSUMED DURING 1967 


"i 


| 7 


7-1 




7-2 7-3 


7-4 


Fuels obtained by purchase Of transfer - 

(Value fuels received from other establishment! 
of your company, al estimated market value.} 

(A) 


Census 
code 

(B-l) 


Unit of 

for 
quantities 

(B-21 


If 52.000 or more of the listed 


If von consumed 
some but less 
than S2.000 
»onh of ihe 
listed item. 

(\l 
(El 


Quantity 

(C) 


Cost, includin 


! 


delivery cost 

(freight-in) 

(D) 


™~!2rl 


Dol- 
lars 


000 ] 000 


000 


1 


Coal - anthracite, bituminous, and lignite 


121005 


3 


Short 
tons 




1 




( ) 


2 


Fuel oil 

Distillate (light) grade numbers 1, 2, 
4, and light diesel fuel 


291141 





Barrel 
(42 gals.) 




1 




( ) 


3 


Residual (heavy) grade numbers 5 and 6 
and heavy diesel fuel 


291151 


3 


Barrel 
(42 gals.) 




1 

i 




( ) 


4 


Gas - natural, manufactured, and mixed 


131300 


6 


1,000 
cu. feet 




1 




( ) 


5 


Other fuels 


960011 


: 






! 




( ) 


6 












$ 






(Sum of lines 1-5 should 
be same as item 5c ) 















204 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MC-20C-Con. 



Form MC-20C 



Item 18 - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 


Page 4 


Section I - DISTRIBUTION OF PRODUCTS BY TYPE OF CUSTOMER 


Indicate the principal class of customer to whom you sold products manufactured 


by the 


Key 


Ma 


rlc 


establishment during 1967 (Mark one) 


rr 


8-1 


o| 




1. Chiefly other business firms (such as retail stores, jobbers, wholesalers, other 
manufacturers, etc.) 


8-2 


( ) 233 


2. Chiefly household consumers through retail store on premises of this establishment 


8-3* 


( ) 237 


Section II - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES 

PLEASE READ THE ENTIRE LIST OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES BELOW BEFORE ANSWERING THIS INQUIRY 


INSTRUCTIONS 
Report net selling value, f.o.b. plant, after dis- Exclude products made in this establishment on a 
counts and allowances and exclusive of freight charges contract basis from materials owned by others. Report 
and excise taxes. commission or contract receipts on the appropriate 
Include products made elsewhere for this establish- Iine below - (Exclude materials consumed in making 
ment on a contract basis from materials supplied by these ltems ' from items 5a and 17A * > 
this establishment. (The cost of these materials Lines 1-14- - Poultry or small game killed in other 
should be included in items 5a and 17A. ) establishments and eviscerated or cut-up in this 

establishment should be included in "Resales," line 34. 


J 


Li_ 


8-1X 




8-3 8-4 


Produces and services 
(A) 


Census 

produci 

code 

(B-l) 


Unit 
of 

for 
quantities 

(B-2) 


Products shipped and other receipts 


Quantity 
ID) 


Value, fob. plant 
(E) 


Millions 


! Thou- 
sands 


Dollar* 


000 


1 000 


000 


1 


HENS (OR FOWL) AND CHICKENS (20151) 

Hens (or fowl) and chickens, other than 
young chickens 

New York dressed ( dressed weight) 


20151 11 


4 


Thousand 

pounds 




$ 






2 


Eviscerated or drawn ( eviscerated weight) , 
including sectioned 


20151 15 


5 


Thousand 
pounds 










3 


Young chickens, including commercial broilers, 
fryers, roasters, and capons 

New York dressed (dressed weight) 


20151 31 


2 


Thousand 
pounds 










4 


Eviscerated or drawn (eviscerated weight), 
including sectioned 


20151 35 


3 


Thousand 
pounds 










5 


TURKEYS (20153) 

Fryer- roaster turkeys (usually under 16 weeks of age) 

( dressed weight) 


20153 12 


8 


Thousand 
pounds 










6 


Young turkeys (mature) (usually 5 to 7 months of age) 
New York dressed (dressed weight) 


20153 13 


6 


Thousand 
pounds 










7 


Eviscerated or drawn (eviscerated weight), 

including sectioned 


20153 16 


9 


Thousand 
pounds 










8 


Old turkeys (breeders)Tusually over 15 months of age) 
( dressed weight) 


20153 18 


5 


Thousand 
pounds 










9 


PROCESSED POULTRY. EXCEPT SOUPS (20154) 
Canned Poultry 

10 ounces and under 


20154 13 


4 


Cases 
of 48 










10 


40.1-60 ounces 


20154 15 


9 


Cases 
of 12 










11 


Other sizes (Specify) 

(Also specify case size in column B-2) 


20154 19 


1 


Cases 










12 


Smoked or cooked poultry, including de boned 


20154 25 


2 


Cases 










13 


OTHER POULTRY AND SMALL GAME (20155) 
Ducks (dressed weight) 


20155 13 


1 


Thousand 
pounds 










14 


Other poultry and small game killed in this 
establishment (geese, rabbits, etc. ) (dressed weight) 


20155 15 


6 


Thousand 
pounds 










15 


LIQUID, DRIED, AND FROZEN EGGS (20156) 
Eggs, dried 
Whites 


20156 11 


3 


Thousand 
pounds 










16 


Yolks 


20156 13 


9 


Thousand 
pounds 










17 


Whole 


20156 15 


4 


Thousand 
pounds 










18 


Mixed 


20156 17 





Thousand 
pounds 










19 


Eggs, frozen or liquid 
'Whites 


20156 51 


9 


Thousand 
pounds 










20 


Yolks 


20156 53 


5 


Thousand 
pounds 










21 


Whole 


20156 55 





Thousand 
pounds 










22 


Mixed 


20156 57 


6 


Thousand 
pounds 











CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



205 



FORM MC-20C-Con. 



FOMt MC- 

(2003) 


20C "' ""iu 1 


MENT OF COMMERCE 


FILE NO 


Ph.5 


POULTRY AND SMALL GAME PRODUCTS - Continued 


Name of establishment (Same as address box) 


Item 18 - PRODUCTS AND SERVICES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT DURING 1967 - Continued 


Section II - FRODUCTS AND SERVICES - Continued 


- 




1 8 


8-1 V 




8-3 8-4 




Census 

product 

code 

(B.l) 


Unit 

of 

measure 

for 
quantities 

<B-2| 


Products shipped and other receipts 


Products and services 
(A) 


Quantity 
(D) 


Value, f.o.b. plant 
(E) 


Millions I JJJJJJ 


Dollar. 


000 1 000 


000 


23 


Butter ( churned in this plant) shipped in consumer 
packages (containers 3 lbs. or less) 


20210 15 


9 


Thousand 
pounds 




* 




24 


Frozen beef and pork pies 


20373 31 


2 


Thousand 
pounds 








25 


Frozen poultry pies 


20373 35 


3 


Thousand 
pounds 








:o 


ALL OTHER FRODUCTS MADE IN THIS ESTABLISHMENT 

Describe and report separately for each product whose 
value was $50,000 or more and not listed above. 
(Specify unit of measure for quantity.) For all 
remaining products describe and report a single 
total value. 














27 
















28 
















29 
















30 


C0NI 
Re 
tl 


'RACT WORK 
ceipts for work done for others on 




93000 00 


8 












(Describe products worked on and kind of work) 




















31 


MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS 
Sales of scrap and refuse 


99980 13 


8 










32 


Receipts for research and developmental work 


99980 41 


9 










3j 


Other miscellaneous receipts, including receipts 
for repair work, etc. 


99980 98 


9 










3, 


RESALES 

Sales of products bought and resold without further 

manufacture, processing or assembly in this 

establishment 

(The cost of such items should be reported in 

item 5b. ) 


99989 00 


6 










35 




TOTAL 


77000 00 


8 






$ ! 




(Sum of lines 1-34, column (E)) 






Items 19 - 21 - Not applicable to this form. 


Remarks 


hem 22 


Name of person to contact regarding this report 


Address (Number and sired, my. Store.) 


ZIP code 


Telephone 


Area code 


lumber 


Extension 


CERTIFICATION - This report is substantially accurate and cov 


rs the permit from , n 




Name ol company 


Address (Number and street, city. State) 


ZIP code 






Signature of authorized person 


Title 


Date 



206 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



PENALTIES FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE - APRIL 30, 1968 



Form Approved: Budget Bureau No. 41-66161 



form MA-100 



ANNUAL SURVEY OF MANUFACTURES 



(For 1967 thla J3 the flr3t sheet of the 1967 Census of Manufactures form) 



RETURN TO ^> JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 



Jeffersonvi I le.. Indiana 47130 



ITEM 1 

Physical 
locatlon- 
and 

Employer 
Identlf Icatio 
Number- 
Complete 
both 
3 and b. 



Is the address originally printed in the address box the 
ACTUAL PHYSICAL LOCATION of this establishment? 

^] Yes — Complete lines (3), (4), and section b. 

^] No — Complete lines (1) through (4), and section b. 



(1) Number and street 



City, village, or other place 



(2) State 



ZIP code 



(3) County in which 14) Is establishment physically 
your establishment iS| located within the boundaries 
physically located . of the city or village? 

lQYes 2^No 



eet give ] 



IN D-D I 



TAB 



IE 



IND-T| 



AREA! 



T£ 



inflT 



TE 



CCS 



"IE 



PPN | 



_3 



NOTICE — Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13 U. S. Code). By 
the lame law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen 
only by sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. 
The law also provides that copies retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report 
refer to this Census File Number \L 



Employer Identification 

Number \L 



(Please correct if mailing address has changed^ 



b. Is the Employer Identification (E.I.) Number printed in the address 
box the SAME as that used for this establishment on your latest 
1967 Employer's Quarterly Federal Tax Return, Treasury Form 941? 



□ Ye 



I No — If "No," enter currently assigned E.I. No. here 



(9 digits) 



Be sure to read Instruction Manual before completing report. Report items 3 — 11, and 15 in thousands (Example: If total payroll is $215,166, enter $215.) 



Complete each item, enter "0*' when appropriate 



1967 



Key 



Complete each item, enter "0" when appropriate 



1966 



1967 



Kev_ 



ITEM 2 

Number 

of 

Employees 



ITEM 3A 

Payrolls 

($000) 



Number of production 
workers during pay 

?eriod including the 
2th of month 



a. March 



0-1 



b. Ma 



0-2 



ITEM 6 



Inventories i 
of this !b 



a. Finished products 



3-1 



Work- 



d. November 



0-4 



e. Sum of lines a 



establishment] - 

at end of year. c. Materials, supplies. 

(5000) fuels, etc. 



3-2 



3-3 



f. Average number (divide line e 
by 4, omit fractions) 



'd. TOTAL (Sum of lines a - c) 



0-6 



g. All other employees (pay period 
including March 12th) 



0-7 



h. TOTAL (Sum of lines f and g)- 



0-8* 



a. Production workers' 
wages 



1-1 



b. All other salaries and wages 



1-2 



ITEM 7 

Capital .a. New structures and 

expenditures I additions to this 

during year I plant (exclude land) 

($000) 

See also 

item 15, 

page 2 



b. New machinery 
| and equipment 



c. TOTAL (Sum of lines a and b)- 



1-3 + 



|c. Used plant and equipment 



|d. TOTAL (Sum of lines a - c) 



3-5 



3-7 



3-8 



ITEM 3B 
Suppl. labor 
costs not 
Incl. In pay- 
rolls (sp_00) 



, Legally required expenditures, 
incl. social security contributi 



V-8 



b. Payments for voluntary programs 



V-9 



c. TOTAL (Sum of lines a and b)- 



v-iot 



ITEM 4 
Plant man- 
hours of 
production 
workers by 
quarter (000) 



a. January through March 



ITEM 8 

Quantity of 
electricity 
(Thousands 
of KWH) 



I. 



Purchased electricity 
(cost is reported in 5d) 



' b. Generated electricity (grosa 
less generating station use) 



April through June 



^1 
c. 

d. October through December 



1-5 



C. Electricity sold or transferred 
to other establishments 



, July through September 



1-6 



1-7 



e. TOTAL (Sum of lines a - d)- 



__. 



ITEM 5 
Cost of 
materials 
(WOO) 

Line 5a 

should equal 
total of 
item I7A. 
Line 5c 
should equal 
total of 
Item I7B. 



Materials, parts, components, 
containers, etc., consumed 



2-1 



, Products bought and 
resold as such 



2-2 



ITEM 10 
Gross book 
value fixed 
assets 
(original 
cost, end 
of year) 
($000) 



'a. Buildings and 
I other structures 
(exclude land) 



I b. Machinery and equipment 



Ic. TOTAL- 



(Sum of lines a and b) 



C Fuels consumed 



2-3 



d. Purchased electricity 



2-4 



ITEM 11 ' a. Buildings and other 

p fln l a l structures (exclude land) 



e. Contract work done for yon 
by others on your materials 



2-5 



>. TOTAL (Sum of lines a - e) ■ 



2-6* 



payments j b. Machinery and equipment 

See ■ 

manual I c. TOTAL 

($000) I (Sum of lines a and b) 



ITEM 9 - Quantity and value of products shipped and other receipts ($000) 

The data reported In this item should be consistent with thosegiven in item 18 for each product class (5-digit code) and for total shipment! 



4£Z 



5-X 



5-2 



5-5 



5-6 



5-7 



Product classes of this establishment 

If printed descriptions are incorrect, please revise. Describe all additional 
products. If more lines are needed, use item 9 (Continued), page 2 

(a) 



Product 

class code 

(See Manual) 



(b) 



6-1 



Unit of 
quantity 

(c) 



1966 



Quantity 
(d) 



Value 
($000) 

(e) 



1967 



Quantity 
(f) fi^2 



Value 
($000) 

(g) 




J. Enter TOTAL from page 2, item 9 (Continued), line e 



k. Receipts for work or services you performed for others on their materials; 
(Describe) 



930008 



I. Miscellaneous receipts (repair work, installation, sales of scrap, etc. 
(Describe) 



999805 



m. Sales of products bought and resold without further manufacture, 
processing, or assembly (Report cost in item 5b.) 



999896 



TOTAL (Sum of lines a - m) 



770008 



TT 



X-4 



X-5 



Pleas* continue on page 2 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



207 



FORM MA-100-Con. 



Product 

class code 

(See Man ual) 

w fTT 



ITEM 9 - 

Continued 

Quantity 
and value 
of products 
shipped 
and other 
receipts 
(1000) 



Additional products of this establishment 
(Describe) 

(a) 



TOTAL (Transfer to page 1, item 9, line j)- 



Unit of 
quantity 



Quantity 



Value (S000) 
(e) 



Quantity 

(o R^ 



VqIul- (S000) 



" fxT 



ITEM 12 
Legal 
form of 
organization 
at end of 
1967 



Legal form of organization of the company which operates this establishment — (X) appropriate box 

1 | | Individual proprietor | | Corporation — (Do not mark if any form of cooperative association) 



2 □ Partnership 



8 | 1 Co-op (Cooperative association), corporate and noncorporate 

9 □ Other - (Specify) . 



ITEM 13 

Changes In 

operator, 

operations 

or 

company 

affiliation 



Changes In operator or operations of this establishment during 1967 

(1) | 1 No change in operator or operations 

(2) j | Reorganized, (Describe in "Remarks," e.g., partnership 

change, or change in corporate status) 

(3) | | Started new business — Date 



'Discontinued operations — Date 



(4) | ] Plant dismantled, abandoned, or destroyed 



(5) | 1 . Plant idle or inactive but still owned 



(6) | | Establishment purchased or leased from another company (Enter 
below: Name, address, and Employer Identification Number (if 
known) of former owner or operator and date of purchase or lease.) 



I (7) I I Establishment sold or leased to another company (Enter below: 
I Name, address, and Employer Identification Number (if known) 

1 of new owner or operator and date of sale or lease.) 



Name of company 



Address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



E.I. Number (9 digits) 



(8) If establishment was purchased, indicate whether the records 
of the predecessor- company were also acquired 
lQYes 2QNo 



(9) If establishment was sold, indicate whether successor 

alon QK/tnirgj TCCOrds 



also acquire 
lQYes 



|v-u 



2QNo 



b. Company affiliation — Complete only if the first digit of your Census File Number (imprinted in the address box) m< <«Y es "' l jf 

is a zero "0." Census records indicate these companies operate only one establishment. ,. ls marJie . °* 

r e J any line complete item 

(1) Is this company owned or controlled by any other company? 1 ( [ Yes 2 [^ 

(2) Does this company own or control any other companies? 1 | | Yes 2 \^_ 

(3) Does this company operate more than one establishment? 1 \ | Yes 2 | 

(4) Did this company have any manufacturing plants under construction but not in operation at the end of the year? . 1 f~] Yes 2 



14) 

No 
No 
No 
No 



} lv-12 



ITEM 14 

i. Other 

companies 
owned or 
establishments 
operated 

Complete if 
item 13b 
(2), (3), or (4) 
is marked 



Name and address and 
Employer Identification Number 



Activity 
(Describe, e.g., manufacturing, retail, 
wholesale etc., and chief products sold) 



Payroll and sales 

($000) 



Are payrolls 
and sales 
included in 
this report? 




b. Parent 
company 

Complete if 
item 13b (I) is 
marked "Yes" 



Employer Identification Number 



ITEM 15 

Force 

account 

capital 

expenditures 



Of the capital expenditures for new structures and buildings reported for 1967 in item 7a, page 1, 
indicate the value put in place by your own labor force 

1| I None 

2 □ Under $100 thousand 

3 | | $100 thousand or more — (Specify amount) $. |V-14 | * 



(Thousands) 



Checks to 

assure a 

complete 

and 

accurate 

report 



The Census Bureau reviews your report for omissions, inconsistencies, and unusual ratios. To save you future correspondence about these problems, 
please make the following checks before returning your report: (1) Review the report carefully to see that no items are omitted for the year being cov- 
ered; (2) Calculate and enter figures for the four "reasonableness" checks below, and review the results; (3) Correct your report for any errors you 
find; explain unusual figures in "Remarks." 



'Reasonableness" checks 



a. Average hourly wages per production worker 



b. Hours worked per year per production worker 



c. Salaries and wages per dollar of shipments 



d. Materials cost per dollar of shipments 



Calculation required for each check 



Item 3Aa (Production workers' wages) 4- item 4e (Total man-hours) 



Item 4e (Total man-hours) x 1QQQ h- jt em 2f (Average number of production workers) 



Item 3Ac (Total payroll) * item 9 (Total value of shipments) 



e. Is the total for Value of Shipments (item 9) greater than the 

sum for Payroll (item 3Ac) plus total Cost of Materials, etc. (item 5f) 



Item 5f (Total materials cost) * item 9 (Total value of shipments) 



Figures for 1967 



□ Ye 



^]No — Explain in "Remarks" 



f. Do the figures in item 9 agree with those reported in item 18 for 
each 5-digit product class and for Total Value of Shipments 



□ *« 



^] No — Explain in "Remarks;' 



Remarks 




FORM MA-IOO 



208 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



DUE DATE: 



Budget Bureau No. 41-R1524; Approval Expires December 31, 1972 



,MA-101 



EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT FOR 
MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION 

Annual Survey of Manufactures 
Please read instructions on reverse side before completing form 



RETURN TO 



> 



Bureau of the Census 
Washington, D.C. 20233 



NOTE: The industry totals compiled from data filed on this form will 
be published by the Bureau of the Census in the Annual Survey of 
Manufactures series as soon as possible after all reports are received. 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by law (Title 13, U.S. Code), by 
the same law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by 
sworn Census employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also 
provides that copies retained in your files are immune from legal process. 



In correspondence pertaining to this report 
refer to this Census File Number ^m 



(Please correct any error in name and address including ZIP code) 



ITEM 1 



Did your company have ANY manufacturing establishments under 
construction but not in operation as of December 31 last year? 



□ Ye 



// "Yes/* please complete 
items 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , and 6. 



□ No- 7 ' "No" complete 
1 ' items 5 and 6 only. 



ITEM 2 



Manufacturing establishments under construction 

or renovation but not in operation during 

the last calendar year 



(a) 



(b) 

IMPORTANT-Figures should be rounded to 
thousands. Please be careful to enter your 
figures in the correct columns. 

EXAMPLE-H amo unt is $1,125,628.28, 
report as ^|$~i | 126 | XXX 



Item 



Mil- 
lions 



Thou- 
sands 



Dol- 
lars 



FOR 

CENSUS 

USE 

(c) 



Name 



Address (Number and street — give actual physical location not mailing address) 



New plants and 
structures 
(Exclude land) 



XXX 



Lvu 



4-2 



Cit\ 



County 



State and ZIP code 



New machinery 
and equipment 



XXX 



Principal products to be made or activities to be conducted at this establishment 



4-3 



Used plant and 
used equipment 



XXX 



4-4 



Employer Identification Number 
for this establishment (9 digits) 



TOTAL- 



XXX 



Name 



Address (Number and street — give actual physical location not mailing address) 



New plants and 
structures 
(Exclude land) 



4-1 




Employer Identification Number 
for this establishment (9 digits) 



total- 



XXX 



Address (Number and street — give actual physical location not mailing address) 



New plants and 
structures 
(Exclude land) 



4-1 



XXX 



4-2 



City 



County 



State and ZIP code 



New machinery 
and equipment 



XXX 



Principal products to be made or activities to be conducted at this establishment 



I V-2 



4-3 



Used plant and 
used equipment 



V-4 



XXX 



Employer Identification Number 
for this establishment (9 digits) 



X-4 



TOTAL- 



XXX 



ITEM 3 



Have any of the capital expenditures reported above been included on 

Form MA-100 for any of your establishments in operation during the survey year? 



[ Yes— If "Yes," please explain below 



□ No 



ITEM 4 



Are any of these new establishments complete replacements 

for your old locations? 

If "Yes," please indicate the line above, and the location that it replaces 



□ Ye 



□ No 



Name of person to contact regarding this report Address (Number, street, city, State, ZIP code) 



ITEM 5 



Telephone 



Area code Number 



Extension 



ITEM 6 



CERTIFICATION - This report is substantially accurate and covers all capital expenditures made by this company for manufacturing facilities (except 
capital expenditures reported in item 7 of Form(s) MA-100, Annual Survey of Manufactures, prepared for each of its operating manufacturing establishments) 



Period covered 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Date 



If additional space is needed, use a separate sheet and identify each item. 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTORES 



209 



DOE IN JEFFERSONVILLE: 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF FORM 



Form Approved; Budget Bureau No. 41-S68017 



form MA-131. 1900 



SUPPLEMENTAL INQUIRY 

CONSUMPTION OF 

MATERIALS, PARTS, CONTAINERS, 

AND SUPPLIES DURING 1967 



GUNS, HOWITZERS, MORTARS, AND 

OTHER ORDINANCES AND 

ACCESSORIES, N.E.C. 



TO: Jeffersonville Census Operations Division 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



NOTICE - Your report to the Census Bureau is confidential by law (Title 13 
U.S. Code, Section 9). It may be seen only by sworn Census employees and may 
be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies retained 
in your file are immune from legal process. 



(Please correct any error in nome and address including ZIP code) 



INSTRUCTIONS 



GENERAL 

This report form is designed to secure detailed information 
regarding the composition of the subtotal reported for "All 
other materials and components, containers, and supplies 
consumed," code 970099, item 17, on your 1967 Census of 
Manufactures report. If the 1967 Census of Manufactures 
report form mailed for the designated plant did not contain an 
item 17, then the costs for the detailed materials reported on 
this form should account for your total cost of materials, 
parts, components, containers, supplies, etc., consumed 
(item 5a). 

A separate report should be filed for the establishment indi- 
cated in the address box. This report should be prepared 
using the file copy of your establishment's 1967 Census of 
Manufactures report form as a guide to insure unduplicated 
reporting. When completed, one copy of each report should 
be returned to the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division, 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 



available upon 
Division, 



Additional copies of this report form are 
request to the Jeffersonville Census Operations 
Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130. 

Regarding the 1963 data column 

To aid you in reporting for 1967, we have preposted your 
1963 information, where it was available, for those materials 
that are identical in content to the information requested in 
1967. This column should be ignored except where figures 
have been preposted and then should only be used for re- 
ference purposes. 

Section I - SUMMARY OF MATERIALS CONSUMED DURING 
1967 

This section contains a three-line summary of information 
reported in item 17, Cost of materials, parts, containers, and 
supplies of your 1967 Census of Manufactures report form. 

Line 1 — Mater to Is, parts, components, containers, etc. — 
Enter the sum of the dollar figures reported in item 17 for all 
specified materials. This figure should equal the total 
reported for item 17 less the figure reported for code 970099 
in item 17. 

Line 2 — AH other materials, etc. — Enter the figure reported 
in item 17 for code 970099. 

Line 3 — Enter the sum for lines 1 and 2 - This figure should 
be identical with the figure reported as Total, item 17, and in 
item 5a of your 1967 Census of Manufactures report form. 

Section 11-1967 CONSUMPTION OF SELECTED MATERIALS, 
PARTS, COMPONENTS, ETC. 

In this section report the requested data on materials, parts, 
etc., for which separate figures were not requested in your 
1967 report. The sum of the figures reported in this section 
should be the same as the total shown on line 2, Section I. 

For listed items in column (a), enter a figure in column (b) 
for each item in which your 1967 consumption amounted to 
S25.000 or more. 

"Other important materials, parts, etc." — List and report 
separate costs for those items amounting to S25.000 or more, 
provided they constitute at least \% of total costs. 



"All other materials, parts, etc., not listedobove (Section II, 
2nd line from bottom)" — Report total cost of materials, 
parts, etc., consumed, not reported separately. 

In reporting nonlisted items on the blank lines provided, do 
not use general terms, such as "operating supplies" or 
"interplant receipts." Groupings of materials, parts and 
supplies similar to those shown for the listed items may be 
reported. 

Report each of the materials actually consumed during 1967 
whether received from other companies, withdrawn from in- 
ventory or obtained from other establishments of this com- 
pany. Report all materials, parts, components, etc., pur- 
chased or received from otherestablishments of your company. 
Do not report parts, components, etc., produced in this 
establishment which are consumed in producing the final 
products of this establishment. For example: castings, 
forgings, stampings, fasteners, valves, hardware, etc., pro- 
duced in this establishment which become part of the estab- 
lishment's final product should not be reported since this 
would involve duplication of the materials consumed in the 
production of these components. Castings, forgings, etc., 
received from other plants of this company should be re- 
ported by this establishment. 

Column (b) - Delivered cost — Report in thousands of 
dollars, the delivered cost actually paid, or payable, after 
discounts and allowances. Include freight and direct charges 
incurred in acquiring the listed materials consumed during 
1967. The values for materials transferred from other estab- 
lishments of this company should be consistent with those 
as reported on your Census of Manufactures form. 

The reported figures may be derived from either purchase, 
consumption or other records. The figures reported for major 
materia Is and supply items should represent amounts con- 
sumed, and, if these differ significantly from purchase costs, 
the latter should be adjusted accordingly by means of an 
estimate. 

If 1967 data are not available, these figures may be esti- 
mated by utilizing percentages derived from other appropriate 
information provided that these are reasonably representative 
of the types and proportions of materials used in 1967. 

If any materials, parts, components or supplies consumed 
cannot be readily identified as being included in the pre- 
listed entries, report the requested information under "Other 
important materials, etc." and describe the item in sufficient 
detail in column (a) so that it may be coded by the Census 
Bureau. 

If your purchase or consumption records are summarized 
differently from the classifications indicated by the pre- 
Usted entries, entries based on your own system are accept- 
able unless your categories are too general, such as "parts" 
or "assemblies." Such entries should be included on the 
lines under "Other important materials, etc.',' or on a separate 
sheet. The items should be described as clearly as possible. 



Name of person who should be contacted if 
questions arise concerning this report 



Address (Number and street, city, State, ZIP code) 



Telephone 



Area code Number 



Exte 



PERIOD OF REPORT 

This report covers the period 



From: (Month, day, year) 



To: (Month, day, year) 



CERTIFICATION — This report is substantially accurate and has been prepared in accordance with instructions. 



Signature of authorized person 



Title 



Date 



210 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



FORM MA-131-1900-Con. 



GUNS, HOWITZERS, MORTARS, AND OTHER 
ORDINANCES AND ACCESSORIES, N.E.C. 


Section I - SUMMARY OF MATERIALS, PARTS, COMPONENTS, ETC., 
CONSUMED DURING 1963 AND 1967 


Line 
No. 


Item 
(a) 


Delivered cost 

(In thousands of dollars) 
(b) 


1963 


1967 


1 


Materials, parts, components, containers and supplies reported separately 
in item 17, of 1963 and 1967 Census of Manufactures 


3 




2 


All other materials, parts, components, containers and supplies consumed 
(item 17, code 970099 of census form) 


s 




3 


TOTAL (hem 5a, reported for the 1963 and 1967 Census of Manufactures) »- 


s 




Section II - 1963 AND 1967 CONSUMPTION OF MATERIALS, PARTS, COMPONENTS, ETC., 
INCLUDED IN SECTION 1, LINE 2 


Line 
No. 


Item 
(a) 


Delivered cost 
(In thousands of dollars) 

(b) 


Code 
No. 


1963 


1967 


1 


Nonferrous metal mill shapes, except copper, aluminum, 
and titanium (rod, bar, sheet, strip, etc.) 






33560 


2 


Metal stampings 






34610 


3 


Bolts, nuts, screws, rivets, and screw machine products 






34500 


I 


Fabricated metal pipe, valves, and pipe fittings 






34900 


5 


Special dies and tools, die sets, jigs, and fixtures, except cutting tools 
for machine tools (See line 18 for cutting tools for machine tools) 






35440 


6 


Plastics and resin materials, molding, extrusion, etc. 






28210 


7 


Fabricated rubber products, excluding tires and inner tubes 
(See line 15 for fabricated plastic products) 






30690 


8 


Pumps and compressors 






35610 


9 


Electronic type components (including resistors, capacitors, 
transformers, etc.) except tubes and solid state semiconductors 






36790 


10 


Radio and electronic communication equipment and navigation aids 
(including airborne transmitters and receivers, radar, etc.) 






36620 


11 


Aircraft flight instruments (including altimeters, automatic pilots, 
and gyroscopes) See line 16 for aircraft engine instruments. 






38110 


12 


Parts specially designed for aircraft and guided missiles 
(including fuel systems, landing gears, governors, and 
machined parts subcontracted to specifications) 






37290 


13 


Rough and dressed lumber 






24210 


14 


Paperboard containers and boxes (including folding, corrugated, and fiber) 






26S00 


15 


Fabricated plastic products 






30790 


16 


Aircraft engine instruments, except flight (including 
thrust power indicators, tachometers, etc.) 






38210 


17 


Nonferrous metal castings, rough and semifinished, other than those 
prelisted in item 17 of the Census form 






33690 


18 


Cutting tools for machine tools 






35450 


19 


Other important materials, supplies, etc. (List and specify remaining 
important items separately — see instructions) 








20 










21 










22 










23 










24 










25 










26 


All other materials, containers, supplies, etc., not listed above 






99999 


27 












Remarks (Use additional sheet, if necessary) 




MA-131 .1 900 








us 


COMM-DC 



CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



211 



FORM NC-K4M 

(For multiunit firms) 



PENALTIES FOR FAILURE TO REPORT 



DUE DATE - APRIL 30, 1968 Budgei Bureau No. 41-S67070; Approval expires December 31, W69 



orm NC-K4M 
(9994) 



1967 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 



DISTRIBUTION OF SALES 
BY CLASS OF CUSTOMER 



RETURN TO 



JEFFERSONVILLE CENSUS OPERATIONS OFFICE 

Jeffersonville, Indiana 47130 



CENSUS 
USE 

ONLY 



NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by low (Title 13 U.S. Code). By the same 
law, your report to the Census Bureau is confidential. It may be seen only by sworn Census 
employees and may be used only for statistical purposes. The law also provides that copies 
retained in your libs are unmune from legal process. 



efer to thi: 



ondenc 



File Nu 






NC-K4M (9994) 



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS 

(See also specific instructions with Product Croup Reference List) 



As part of the 1967 Census of Manufactures, the Census Bureau is conducting 
this survey of the Distribution of Manufacturers' Sal?s by Class of Customer. 
The last such survey was conducted as part of the 1958 Census of Manufactures. 
This survey will provide a current analysis of the marketing channels through 
which the goods move from the manufacturer to the user or consumer. The results 
arc needed for the improvement of the national income and product statistics. 



Estimotes ore acceptable - We app 

sales analysis and that completenf 

companies. Therefore, some comp, 

greater extent than they do on other 

available except at considerable expense, or if your cla 

groupings differ significantly from those requested 

acceptable. 



eciale that there is no uniform system of 
5S of records varies considerably among 
nies will have to use estimates to a far 
Census surveys. If actual records are not 



si--, in 



will be 



What to report - You are requested to provide a summary companv level report on 
the shipments of groups of products from your company's manufacturing plants 
and sales branches and offices. This report should include data for all domestic 
subsidiaries, divisions, and establishments as reported on Form NC-K1, 
"Company Summary Form." You are requested in section 1 to allocate the ship- 
ments from your manufacturing plants, including movements within the company, 
according to type of customer; and in section 2 to further trace the shipments 
which move from or on order from company operated sales branches, sales 
offices, and administrative offices. 



Product groups - (Sec accompanying Reference Manual PGL-< NC-K I'D.) Report 
groups of the products for which you report shipments from manufacturing estab- 
lishments in item 9, Form MA- 100. However, the products have been grouped 
into a smaller number of categories for this report. The Reference Manual lists 
the product categories for which class of customer information is to be reported 
and describes the products, as reported on Form MA-100, which are tobe summar- 
ized into the groups. 



At the head of 
manual. In dislri 



clum 



ronditi. 



er the product code and description from the 
t> 1. 1 uss uf «. uslomcr, include products Lough: 

, (resales) in their appropriate product group. 
Kxclude, however, miscellaneous receipts and receipts For contract and commis- 
sion work. In both sections 1 and 2, please estimate the: percent of each product 
group which is resales, lines 15 and 28. 



of salt 



s and sh 


pme 


its - Speeial 


inst 


■uct 


ions 


on 


repor 


in 


l sales 


lor a 


duels are 


int 


uded in the i 


nstr 


II t 


ons. 


1. 


nless 


ih 


*re ate 


such 


s, use 


the 


following st 


in da 


rds 


in 


cot 


ipleli 


ig 


this r 


sport. 



few particula 
special instn 

Section 1 - Allocate the shipments from your manufacturing plants to the classes 
of customers described. In section 1A, list those customers which represent 
within company shipments, i.e., to other plants of the company for further pro- 
cessing or to the company's own wholesale or retail outlets. For purposes of 
section 1A, your sales branches and sales offices, if any, are considered as 
customers. If you report sales on line 1 (shipments to or on order from sales 
branches, sales offices or administrative offices), you must also report in 
section 2. Products should be valued f.o.b. plant as reported on Form MA-100. 



Section 2 - Products sold from sales branches, sale 
offices should be valued at sales price to the custo 



DESCRIPTION OF CLASS OF CUSTOMER 

(Corresponds to report form line number) 

SHIPMENTS, SALES OR TRANSFERS TO OTHER 
ESTABLISHMENTS OF THIS COMPANY 



2. Merchant wholesole establishments - Report shipments to or orders from any 
establishment operated by this company for which vou report in the 1967 Census 
of Business on Form CB-50A-50R. 

3. Retail stores or outlets - Report sales through separately operated retail stores 
for which a report is also required in the Census of Business. 

4. Other monufocturing plonts — Report all transfers or shipments from one manu- 
facturing plant of this company to another whether for further processing, for use 
as a material or supply, or for resales by the other plants. 

5. Other establishments - Report all transfersor shipments to other plants of this 
company, such as mining, transportation, service, etc. 



Section IB - SHIPMENTS TO OTHER COMPANIES, INDIVIDUALS, 
GOVERNMENTS, AND EXPORT 

6. Wholesalers - Include all wholesale companies purchasing primarily lor resale 
to other businesses or to institutions and not directly to household consumers 



7. Retailers - (Do not include shipments to your 
Include 

farm consumption. Include all chain stores, mail order houses, department stores, 
independent retailers, including independent route salesmen such as bakery or 
dairy truck distributors who sell directly to households. 

8. Manufacturers - Report sales to companies known to be engaged in manufac- 
turing. Include as manufacturers food processors such as meat packers, bakeries, 
and bottling plants; sheet metal operations; feed mixers; logging camps; saw- 
mills; priming; publishing; apparel jobbers; machine shops. 

9. Commercial and industrial users, construction. State and local governments, 
private ond public institutions - Include all private firms and businesses not 
considered manufacturers, retailers, or wholesalers. Thus, include companies 
engaged in construction, mining, transportation; as well as utilities, restaurants, 
hotels, and other businesses providing services; include hospitals and schools, 
as well as State and local governments. (Report sales to the Federal Government 

separately.) Lines 9b (and 22b) are used only for product groups for which special 

instructions appear in the Product Group Reference List. 

10. Individuals, household users, and farmers - Include all direct sales from the 
manufacturing plants to households, farmers, and individual users (including 
sales to your company's own employees at retail, even if at a discount). Com- 

fanies which deliver products to customers should include route sales to house- 
olds in this item (sales to stores, institutions, and restaurants). Slate and local 
governments should be reported in the appropriate category. 

11. Federal Government - Include all sales to branches of the Federal govern- 
ment and to corporations owned by the Federal Government; include sales to 
military post exchanges, ship's stores and similar units. 



If you ope 
Shipments 



1. Sales branches 



offic 



old, 



Include 



'$", 



ile manufacturing plants reporting on Census Form MA- 175, "Report on 
o or Receipts for Work Done Tor Federal Govemmenl Agencies and Theii 
and Suppliers, " report as sales to government only those shipments 
made directly to the government. Indirect sales under subcontractor should be 
reported as shipments in the class of customer to which the prime contractor is 
classified, usually other manufacturing componies. 

12. Export - Report sales for direct export, including shipments to your com- 
pany's foreign subsidiaries and affiliates. Do NOT include shipments to domestic 
exporters which should be reported as sales to wholesalers. 

13. Other - Report sales for all customers not listed in lines 6-12 (and 19-25). 



or on orders received through those establishments of your companv which report 
on Form CB-51A-51L, Census of Business, "Manufacturers'^ Sales Branches 
and Offices." These are establishments operated bv the companv primarily to 
sell the products manulactured by the company, although they may also' sell 
products made by other companies. (These are distinguished from merchant 
wholesale establishments of the company, SEE line 2.) Also, for purposes ol 
this inquiry consider as a sales office anv administrative office which handles 
sales of the companv. These establishments report on Form NC-X6, "Central 
Administrative Offices and Auxiliaries." 

Include as shipments to sales branches, sales offices and administrative offices 
not only the value of products actually shipped from the plant to these estab- 
lishments, but also products shipped from the plant to customers on order from 
If any sales are reported on line 1, section 1, sales 



14. Totol shipments from monufocturing estoblishme, 
should approximate the sum ol product class ship, 
reported in item 9. Form MA-100, of establishment reports with 



The sum of lines 1-11 
omprising the group 



ales branch or olfi, 



ale 



and sale 



„ff:, 



nust als 



nulele 



16. Totol for product group reported in item 9 of Form MA-100 should equal the 
sum of product class shipments comprising the product group reported in item 9, 
Form MA-100. 

Section 2 - SALES BY SALES BRANCHES, SALES OFFICES, AND ADMINIS- 
TRATIVE OFFICES - Lines 17-26 - Class of customer definitions are the same 
as [or se.lior, IB. 



Name of person I 



onlact regarding this report 



Telephone 



CERTIFICATION - This report is substantially 
Name of companv 



Signature of authorized person 



nd covers the period fr< 



\ddress(7Vum6er and street, city. State) 



Pleose continue on page 2 



212 



1967 ECONOMIC CENSUSES: PROCEDURAL HISTORY 



c 
o 
U 



u 



o 
c 
o 



a 



6 

2 

2 
cc 
o 

LL 



a. 


-1 


H 


s 


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